Additions to David Wheldon's MS pages.

A forum for the discussion of antibiotics as a potential therapy for MS

Additions to David Wheldon's MS pages.

Postby SarahLonglands » Wed Jul 27, 2005 10:27 am

http://www.davidwheldon.co.uk/ms-treatment.html

Over the last little while, my husband, David Wheldon has made many adjustments and fine tunings to his MS pages, so it might be worth re-reading them to keep up to date. For instance, the adjuncts section has been much changed, using the both of us, for testing purposes, as the guinea pigs. I copy it here, but there is much more new.

Adjuncts


The brain has extraordinary powers of repair, but must be provided with the building-blocks by which to do it. This infection is intracellular; the organism interferes with mitochondria, the cells' powerhouses. Many of the symptoms of the disease - particularly the fatigue - may be due to mitochondrial exhaustion. Toxins known as free radicals are released as various synthetic pathways are disrupted. If this continues unchecked for too long irreversible mitochondrial damage may occur. A combined dietary supplementation of antioxidants is strongly recommended. (See Syburra C, Passi S. Oxidative stress in patients with multiple sclerosis. Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1999 May-Jun;71(3):112-5.)

Vitamin C 1G daily
E 800iu daily
Omega 3 fish oil daily
Acetyl L-Carnitine 500mg daily
Alpha Lipoic acid 150mg daily
Ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q10) 200mg daily
Selenium 200 micrograms daily.
N-acetyl cysteine 600mg twice daily
melatonin 1.5mg at night may be considered.

This may seem like polypharmacy, but all these agents are needed. This is because the mitochondrial membrane is the bottle-neck for numerous key cellular reactions, and it is exactly here that chlamydiae hover as they steal the cell's energy and other vital molecules via tiny tubes.

In addition B complex, Magnesium, 300mg and Calcium 500mg supplements in the evening (remote from the time of taking doxycycline) daily.

Vitamin D (high dose - 4000iu) (less may be needed in infections other than MS)

Vitamin B12 injections once weekly for 3 months, then monthly for the duration of continuous treatment. (There is now evidence that oral B12 is satisfactorily absorbed, except in patients with pernicious anaemia. High dose supplementation is recommended.)

Regular Lactobacillus acidophilus, daily, either as a supplement or in capsules. This is to maintain bowel flora in the face of antibiotic treatment. Tablets of Lactobacillus sporogenes spores may be considered. These have the advantage of getting into the small bowel in large numbers.


Sarah
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Postby VladFT » Wed Jul 27, 2005 11:20 am

Hi Sarah ,
many thanks to you and David. Great updates.
I just looked through, but what caught my eyes is the possible connection between C.Pn. and blood pressure. Wide pulse pressure in particular.
It'll take me a while with a dictionary to sort through the medical lingo and terms, but I understood ( from the graphs) it can have something to do with
high blood pressure and a wide gap between cystolic and diastolic pressures in particular. You'll be smiling and laughing , but that's the problem that's been haunting me since adolescence ! My pressure has always been in the 150-70 , sometimes 160-90. Aside from beeing just high, doctors would always say that the gap was not normal. I was put in hospital twice to examine my high blood pressure without any results. Everything looked normal.
I wonder if the antibiotical treatmant that I'm now on will have some effect on my blood pressure.
This is really interesting !
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Postby SarahLonglands » Wed Jul 27, 2005 12:52 pm

Hello Vladimir,

This is very interesting: watch out for my next update in the regimens section, coming either later tonight or tomorrow. This will include something about this very thing, but it isn't my blood pressure either, which has always been on the low side. :wink:

Sarah
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
SarahLonglands
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Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Bedfordshire UK

Postby VladFT » Wed Jul 27, 2005 9:15 pm

Hello Sarah,
looking forward to you post.
I've just reread the update about connection to blood pressure.
Do you know where I can learn some more about the connection between C Pn and stiffening of great arteries ?
Can antibiotics treat it or a separate treatment is needed ?

Many thanks.

Vlad
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Postby SarahLonglands » Thu Jul 28, 2005 3:58 am

Hello Vlad,

I'm using David's computer at the moment which I don't like, but I completely lost all internet access on mine after my last reply to you yesterday. I'll finish of working on my update as soon as I have sorted out the problem. I'll see what info. I can find for you, but to slightly preview what I will be posting, yes there is, certainly in the early stages of stiffening. Now I'll have to post the update, even if I end up bringing what I've written through here and evacuating my husband for a few minutes!

Take care,

Sarah
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
SarahLonglands
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Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Bedfordshire UK

For Vlad.....................

Postby SarahLonglands » Mon Aug 01, 2005 4:33 am

http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/short/105/22/2646
Roxithromycin Treatment Prevents Progression of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Chlamydia pneumoniae Seropositive Men
A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Evidence has been provided that the atherosclerotic process may be associated with chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae. The effect of antibiotic treatment on peripheral arterial occlusive disease has not been investigated yet......................................

........................but Conclusions— This study indicates that macrolide treatment for 1 month is effective in preventing C pneumoniae seropositive men from progression of lower limb atherosclerosis for several years



http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/106/10/1219 (Full text article)
This one took me ages to find: Their results came about by accident.
Background— Infection with Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae is associated with coronary heart disease. We conducted an intervention study using antibiotics against these bacteria in patients with acute coronary syndromes to determine whether antibiotics reduce inflammatory markers and adverse cardiac events.
Methods and Results— Patients (n=325) admitted with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina (acute coronary syndromes) were randomized to receive a 1-week course of 1 of 3 treatment regimens: (1) placebo; (2) amoxicillin (500 mg twice daily), metronidazole (400 mg twice daily), and omeprazole (20 mg twice daily); or (3) azithromycin (500 mg once daily), metronidazole (400 mg twice daily), and omeprazole (20 mg twice daily). Serum fibrinogen, white cell count, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured at study entry and at 1, 3, and 12 months during follow-up. Cardiac death and readmission with acute coronary syndrome were considered clinical end points. Patients were followed for 1 year. C-reactive protein levels were reduced (P=0.03) in unstable angina patients receiving amoxicillin, and fibrinogen was reduced in both patient groups receiving antibiotics (P=0.06). There were 17 cardiac deaths and 71 readmissions with acute coronary syndrome. No difference in frequency or timing of end points was observed between the 2 antibiotic groups. At 12 weeks, there was a 36% reduction in all end points in patients receiving antibiotics compared with placebo (P=0.02). This reduction persisted during the 1-year follow-up. Neither C pneumoniae nor H pylori antibody status was significantly related to response to treatment.

Conclusions— Antibiotic treatment significantly reduced adverse cardiac events in patients with acute coronary syndromes, but the effect was independent of H pylori or C pneumoniae seropositivity.

You can find plenty more on pub-med. You probably have already. :wink:
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
SarahLonglands
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Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Bedfordshire UK


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