The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

A forum for the discussion of antibiotics as a potential therapy for MS

The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby SarahLonglands » Tue May 28, 2013 10:58 am

It has been very nearly ten years since I started the antibiotic protocol for multiple sclerosis initially developed at Vanderbilt University only a few years previously. After a tricky start of a couple of weeks I adjusted to the treatment quite easily: easier than many people here, so although I finished the treatment after four years, I stayed around to to offer advice to new people wanting to start the treatment.

There has been very little progress since then: it is not the easiest of treatments and many people drop out. Trials fall by the wayside because not enough people stay to finish the trial or not enough people can be found in the first place.

This is a shame because it is not only the people with multiple sclerosis who are affected but chlamydia pneumoniae has been implicated in so many other diseases. You can find this easily enough by looking up in PubMed any disease in the following list given to me by my hard-working husband:


Chronic infection with C. pneumoniae presents itself as an inflammatory vasculitis; it is often accompanied by Livedo Reticularis.


Here is a list of diseases likely associated with chronic C. pneumoniae infection:


Atheromatous arterial disease

Hypertension

Multiple Sclerosis

Stroke

Alzheimer’s Disease

Pericarditis

Sinusitis

Chronic bronchitis

Emphysema

Fibrosing lung disease

Achalasia of the cardia

Crohn’s DiseaseInterstitial Cystitis

Pyoderma gangrenosa

Sacro-iliitis

Ankylosing spondylitis

Giant cell arteritis

Asthma

Type 1 diabetes

Chronic Fatigue

This list is not comprehensive!



When I started treatment it was hoped that eventually there would be a vaccine available for Chlamydia pneumoniae and maybe ten years isn't a long time, especially since C pn was only found to be pathogenic a few years before that,but the optimist in me would expect to find some reference of a vaccine in PubMed by now but there is only this, published three years ago:

Novel Chlamydia pneumoniae vaccine candidates confirmed by Th1-enhanced genetic immunization

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19961962



My dream is that in future a vaccine would be available not just for a proven infection but something given as standard in the same way that I was given a vaccine against tuberculosis at school, when I was about thirteen and David, being a few years older was given a vaccination against smallpox. Now, being even more optimistic here: I didn't need a smallpox vaccine because it was deemed extinct in most of the world by the time I would have had it. Perhaps that will happen next with tuberculosis and then Chlamydia pneumoniae, then a decade or so after that people will notice a reduction in the amount of people contracting these diseases, wondering why young people don't get MS any longer and why Alzheimer's Disease and strokes don't seem to be lined up for the ageing population anymore.

Sarah
Last edited by SarahLonglands on Wed May 29, 2013 8:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Re: The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby CureOrBust » Tue May 28, 2013 10:35 pm

My dream is that in future a vaccine would be available not just for a proven infection but something given as standard in the same way that I was given a vaccine against tuberculosis at school, when I was about thirteen and David, being a few years older was given a vaccination against smallpox.
No doctor here, but my understanding is that a vaccine is only to stop future infections, and would therefore not be of use to a "proven infection"; and hence you were vaccinated against tuberculosis before you got it. They did not wait for a "proven infection", at which point it would of been too late.
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Re: The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby SarahLonglands » Wed May 29, 2013 8:14 am

Cureo, of course I was vaccinated for tuberculosis before I got it: I would hardly think that the whole class of thirteen year olds in an English middle class school had TB, every year!

If you had read my post correctly you would have noticed that I was talking about everybodies' future: a life that would be lived without the threat of so many diseases.

Sarah
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Re: The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby notasperfectasyou » Wed May 29, 2013 12:11 pm

This is just my personal hunch, but I think when a drug is developed to effectively treat antibiotic resistant tuberculosis, we're going to have some very valuable insights on the next steps toward curing MS. It seems to me that key discoveries are often made in unrelated areas of investigation.
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Re: The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby SarahLonglands » Thu May 30, 2013 8:34 am

Ken, I think the main reason for drug resistant TB is people with TB not taking the full course of abx. That is likely to happen even when a new antibiotic is found. A vaccine given to enough young people would give herd immunity, but places like the Indian subcontinent are jolly big places and many of them are coming here, not necessarily legally.

Sarah
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Re: The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby Gogo » Sun Jun 16, 2013 2:44 am

CureOrBust wrote:
My dream is that in future a vaccine would be available not just for a proven infection but something given as standard in the same way that I was given a vaccine against tuberculosis at school, when I was about thirteen and David, being a few years older was given a vaccination against smallpox.
No doctor here, but my understanding is that a vaccine is only to stop future infections, and would therefore not be of use to a "proven infection"; and hence you were vaccinated against tuberculosis before you got it. They did not wait for a "proven infection", at which point it would of been too late.


Cure, I agree. Vaccine would not help those who have the infection. In the first place, the implication of CPN in MS should be proven.

Also, just a question to Anecdote. If vaccine can be developped and patented then why there is no interest from pharma?

Also, as for abx for MS, if abx used in the protocol are off-patent, then why not a new, more effective abx can be used in trials? That would rank in money for pharma. When I talked to some docors they told me that the abx used in the protocol are old ones and there are already better ones on the market and you have to take them for shorter period of time.
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Re: The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby SarahLonglands » Sun Jun 16, 2013 8:18 am

Maybe I could have worded it a bit better, but the vaccine would not be for someone already infected but for young people to stop them getting infected in the future much like the TB vaccine I was given when 13.

If this was developed and became standard,then decades down the line people would start wondering why heart disease was diminishing and why far fewr people developed MS or asthhma or one of the other things on my list.

Gogo, I really would suggest that you don't try ketek: toted by Aventis as a replacement for roxithromycin.

Sarah
Last edited by SarahLonglands on Sun Jun 16, 2013 9:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Re: The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby Gogo » Sun Jun 16, 2013 8:47 am

Anecdote wrote:
If this was developed and became standard,then decades down the line people would start wondering why heart disease was diminishing and why far fewr people developed MS or asthhma or one of the other things on my list.

Sarah


Of course. But first it has to be proved that Cpn is the causative factor. :) If you read the net, you will see that other scientists suspect other bacterias or other viruses might be behind MS. Also others suspect other causes. So, we can just hope that sy comes out with some evidence and the puzzle will be solved. Until then, anyone can try any therapies, but we should not even suggest that we know what is causing MS. That is reckless, mainly if we do not talk about potential risks of taking the unapproved therapy.

Gogo, I really would suggest that you don't try ketek: tpoted by Aventis as a replacement for roxithromycin.

What did you want to say?
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Re: The Need for a Vaccine against Chlamydia Pneumoniae

Postby SarahLonglands » Sun Jun 16, 2013 9:06 am

I suggest you look up ketek in Wikipedia or elsewhere.
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Posts: 2105
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