MS, cancer, goats

A forum for the discussion of antibiotics as a potential therapy for MS

MS, cancer, goats

Postby Katman » Wed Apr 30, 2008 10:32 am

After such a long time that we even have changed emails, and forgetting that my password was capitalized so I couldn't get in to write about all my (many) adventures, with my extended efforts, I finally arrived here with a splash and a plop. Now what?


A short history for newcomers and for those who have forgotten I existed: I began my story on the "Regimens"section of this excellent forum, but like some others, am moving to the "Antibiotics" section - much more sensible.

I was (am still by original diagnosis) PPMS and almost 4 very long years ago was on a cane, soon to degenerate to a walker. When my sister found David Wheldon's site, I began antibiotics 43 months ago. That was the start of one of the great adventures of an exciting life filled with great adventure. My years between then and now are written on a forum which is something of a spin-off of this one on Chlamydia Pneumoniae.

My improvement has been so dramatic that last summer I drove to Gilette, Wyoming with 8 of our beloved goats to the National show, with the whole distance, round trip, being 4300 miles. My husband stayed home to care for the rest of the herd and finance the trip - to keep the boat afloat. This does not include the twice a day feeding, milking, and clipping (show preparation) of the animals. I spent the whole show day in the ring - on my feet and VERY active. By way of comparison, to demontrate what an undertaking this was, in 2004 at the Nationals in Indianapolis, Indiana, we sold half our herd because it was so obvious that I was going downhill at an ever-increasing rate. That was the worst year of my life. That year I buried my last horse, our 12 and 16 year old dogs, our 11 and 15 year old goats, and was diagnosed with MS and losing my ability to do any of the things that I had loved since I was 4 years old.

This year I was diagnosed with breast cancer and in January had a bilateral mastectomy. I was fortunate - it was stage 1a - very early. I was on Arimidex (a second generation tamoxifen) for a month which was supposed to be 5 years, but it was destroying my knee and giving me suicidal thought, which I have NEVER had, so I stopped. I plan to start LDN soon. Reconstruction will begin August 5. It could have been months earlier but I have been so busy that there simply will not be time to work it in until then.

In 2005 or 2006 I gave away my cane, and now spend most of my day working in the barn with the goats. My estimate for how much of my pre-MS self has returned is between 60% and 90%. The gulf between the 2 is because I am still on abx (antibiotics) and still get knocked down considerably by flagyl. The 30% is the difference between "good" days and "bad" days - i.e., the bad days being when I am under the influence of flagyl and its aftermath. Now, 38 days after my last pulse, I am going, going, going...

My newly-awakened mind can't help but wonder if there is a connection between the way that Chlamydia Pneumonia bacteria "live" and cancer, after having discovered that CPn bugs are frequently found in cancer cells.
2010 5 years 4 months Now on Amoxicillin, Doxy, Rifampin, Azith, and caffeine in addition to  flagyl. 90% normal good days-50% normal bad days. That is a good thing.
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Postby MacKintosh » Wed Apr 30, 2008 11:21 am

Rica, How lovely to have you here! Now, as I recall, we met up in July of 2006 and you were without a cane then, so good things were already in process.

You're the prime example we point to when someone talks about quitting at the year mark. Can you imagine what life would have been like, had you quit at a a year on abx? (I know I was nowhere near ready to stop at a year!)

Miracles abound, if only we know where to look. These days, it seems the internet is delivering lots of miracles! :wink:
The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi
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Goat Gal!!!

Postby notasperfectasyou » Thu May 01, 2008 12:02 pm

Rica!!!!

I have to admit I've spent most of my time here and not at CPn where Kim is mostly. I need to check in there to see how you're doing. How is the cancer? Is it gone? Do you need follow up treatment? Do they want you on chemo to followup? What did they think of your being on ABX?

Sounds awesome to be caneless!!!

We're still in the "getting started" mode. Kim's just starting her 4th pulse today.

Ken
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Postby SarahLonglands » Fri May 02, 2008 5:31 am

Rica, which came first: the splash or the plop? :?

Do you never use a cane at all now? I don't ordinarily, but if I am walking further than our local post office, about 200 yds, or somewhere new, I use one of my trekking poles for reassurance. Its also useful to show that I can't just duck out of the way as quickly as I would have done or look like I should be able to do.

Which since it is raining here, we are back to the splash or the plop!

I'll email you something about the last paragraph, but there is a connection.

Sarah
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Postby Katman » Fri May 02, 2008 10:21 am

The splash is wishful thinking, since we are still in what is classed "extreme drought". The plop is when I am surrounded by our five dogs (four of them rescues) and get invited to sit and play, always a delightful time. Their combined weight is close to 450 pounds, so it could be classed as a thud.

As for goats, they should always be in at least twos if not three or more. One goat alone is a sad creature in solitary confinement, no matter whether we think the surroundings are palatial. They are smarter than most people and more sociable, though there is a strictly observed "pecking" order. Along with "queenly" rights, though, go responsibilities: if there is a threat, the leader will give her life if necessary. We say that sheep got the wool and goats got the brains.

Back to the subject at hand, no I never use a cane or any other device. Now instead, I carry buckets of water, grain, or flakes of hay, or kids (the real thing), or boards and tools, or I have a goat by the collar, taking her wherever she should go.

This brings back unpleasant memories of four years ago. Speaking of the barn and buckets of water, I remember trying to pick up a one gallon bucket of water - I couldn't. I started falling and let go. Now I routinely carry thirty-five pound buckets. How satisfying to be able to do the things that need doing.
2010 5 years 4 months Now on Amoxicillin, Doxy, Rifampin, Azith, and caffeine in addition to  flagyl. 90% normal good days-50% normal bad days. That is a good thing.
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Postby MacKintosh » Thu May 08, 2008 9:38 pm

Rica, I just read your tag line and it really made me feel good. (Not as good as you feel, I'm sure, but good.) :wink:
The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi
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Postby SarahLonglands » Fri May 09, 2008 5:53 am

Likewise Rica: I must smarten mine up. I've just been told about an old friend who has progressive MS, won't try antibiotics: prefers colloidal silver and bee stings and is just getting steadily worse. She gave me up because she thought I was mad, but now has carers three times a day and unable to leave the house. Shit! She used to be a professional violinist and she is only in her early forties.

Sarah
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Postby MacKintosh » Fri May 09, 2008 11:17 pm

And to think we're doing cpn protocols to avoid feeling helpless and hopeless and then you have to feel that way, anyway, because your friend can't be persuaded to save herself. I'm so sorry, Sarah.
The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi
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