USE OF BETA-INTERFERONS TO TREAT RESTENOSIS

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

USE OF BETA-INTERFERONS TO TREAT RESTENOSIS

Postby sou » Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:23 pm

Hi.

I accidentally stumbled upon this patent. It reminds me of something, but I don't know if I have seen it on this forum. If it is not news, please let this thread die in dishonor :-).

USE OF BETA-INTERFERONS TO TREAT RESTENOSIS

sou
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Feb 02, 2010 5:47 am

that's actually quite interesting sou, news to me - but then i have not read everything in the CCSVI forum as it has grown.
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Postby bluesky63 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 7:14 am

Might be a compelling reason to keep doing your shots! Here's this, for example (and I also apologize if this has already been done to death; I don't see very well and I miss things when I read online):

http://cardiovascres.oxfordjournals.org ... t/66/3/433

Interference by interferons: Janus faces in vascular proliferative diseases

Rainer Wessely*
German Heart Center and 1st Department of Medicine, University of Technology, Lazarettstr. 36, 80636 Munich, Germany

* Corresponding author. Tel.: +49 89 1218 1514; fax: +49 89 1218 4013. Email address: rwessely@dhm.mhn.de

Interferons (IFNs) display pleiotropic properties; not only do they protect cells from viral infections but they may also modulate cell growth and differentiation as well as innate and adaptive immune responses. Therapeutic applications of IFNs have proven efficacy in a variety of illnesses, including hepatitis, multiple sclerosis, and some forms of cancer.

Emerging evidence has been obtained during recent years that interferons impact on molecular and cellular mechanisms implicated in the development of vascular proliferative diseases such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Further appreciation and delineation of the precise mechanisms on how interferons influence vascular proliferative disease processes could potentially facilitate the development of novel treatment options attenuating these common causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
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Postby sou » Tue Feb 02, 2010 8:51 am

Hi.

I believe there are other drugs or supplements that can prevent restenosis than interferons, which have such nasty side effects and are toxic to the liver. On the other hand, it's the dose that makes the poison. At what dose should interferons be given to a liberated patient?

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Postby bluesky63 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 8:59 am

Oh, that's definitely true that there are less toxic substances that can assist with healing. :-) The more I read the more interesting all these connections are. I read this type of study and wonder -- is the natural approach enough? Is the procedure itself enough? All of us are going to be the big experiment as we use various methods and then see what the outcomes are.
Last edited by bluesky63 on Sat Feb 06, 2010 9:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Sotiris » Tue Feb 02, 2010 9:25 am

sou wrote:Hi.

I believe there are other drugs or supplements that can prevent restenosis than interferons, which have such nasty side effects and are toxic to the liver. On the other hand, it's the dose that makes the poison. At what dose should interferons be given to a liberated patient?

sou
Rebif doses are 22 or 44 μg and are given thrice a week while (according to the patent) a therapeutically effective daily dose of interferon- useful for treating restenosis is 0.25 mg (8 million IU) injected subcutaneously every other day, i.e. approx. 5 to 10 times the rebif dose.
But maybe we have to see it the other way round. I mean, that given the fact that no one knows how exactly the interferons work, it could be that they simply help the endothelium and the vascular system.
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Postby cah » Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:18 pm

Sotiris wrote:But maybe we have to see it the other way round. I mean, that given the fact that no one knows how exactly the interferons work, it could be that they simply help the endothelium and the vascular system.


That would be the greatest of all irony if the CCSVI paradigm would not only make the interferons dispensable but also tell how they (sort of) work...
"There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." Socrates
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