fainting? (collapsed last night_

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Postby L » Sun Mar 28, 2010 11:12 am

bluesky63 wrote:L, it's funny that your experience with your tachycardia made you decide against a CCSVI procedure -- I have the opposite reaction! I have had two radiofrequency catheter ablations, one for Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and one for atrial tachycardia. The first was was seven hours. I figured that after going through all of that, a CCSVI procedure would be simple. :-)


Oh no, it hasn't made me decide not to do it, just put me off in the sense that it's just made me really apprehensive. I can't even face injections anymore, any kind of medical intervention makes me feel bad. But I'd go through with it tonight given the chance. I am on Dr Simka's waiting list for 2011.
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Postby Nunzio » Sun Mar 28, 2010 3:16 pm

Hi Zap,
you just had a Vasovagal episode most likely triggered by the intense pain of the cramp.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasovagal_episode
Nothing major but get checked by your GP anyway
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Inclined Bed Therapy prevents orthostatic intolerence

Postby AndrewKFletcher » Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:17 am

2008 Dec;18(6):318-24. Epub 2008 Oct 15.
Head-up sleeping improves orthostatic tolerance in patients with syncope.
Cooper VL, Hainsworth R.
Cardiorespiratory Unit, St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK.
OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to examine the effect of head-up sleeping as a treatment for vasovagal syncope in otherwise healthy patients. Treatment for syncope is difficult. Pharmacological treatments have potential side effects and, although other non-pharmacological treatments such as salt and fluid loading often help, in some cases they may be ineffective or unsuitable. Head-up sleeping may provide an alternative treatment. METHODS: Twelve patients had a diagnosis of vasovagal syncope based both on the history and on early pre-syncope during a test of head-up tilting and graded lower body suction. They then underwent a period of 3-4 months of sleeping with the head-end of their bed raised by 10 degrees , after which orthostatic tolerance (time to pre-syncope during tilt test) was reassessed. RESULTS: Eleven patients (92%) showed a significant improvement in orthostatic tolerance (time to pre-syncope increased by 2 minutes or more). Plasma volume was assessed in eight patients and was found to show a significant increase (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). There was no significant change in either resting or tilted heart rate or blood pressure after head-up sleeping. INTERPRETATION: Head-up sleeping is a simple, non-pharmacological treatment which is effective in the majority of patients. However, it may not be tolerated by patients or bed-partners long term and whether the effects continue after cessation of treatment remains to be determined.
Find us on Facebook.com/InclinedBedTherapy
IBT website: http://inclinedbedtherapy.com
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Postby belsadie » Mon Mar 29, 2010 5:54 am

:?: Interesting note about blood pressure. The first "attack" on my legs was when I was walking up the bock and had to stop due to the painful cramping in both legs. This was relieved by massaging the calves of both legs. When I got home, I took my blood pressure. It was 200/110!!
I called my PCP who subsequently put me on Lisinopril to lower the pressure. That worked, but, soon after I had a bout with optic neuritis and the neuro exams that followed resulted in the MS diagnosis. I also had a mild case of shingles and Bells palsy [herpes connection ?!] and varicose vein surgery prior to the diagnosis. It seems I reinforce all the theories about Ms connections to viral infection and venous insufficiency. I'm happy to say I'm on the waiting list for Dr. S's treatment in Brooklyn. Oh happy day!
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Postby Nunzio » Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:20 am

Hi Bel,
this is what happened to me.
I do not mean the cramps but High blood pressure- Blood pressure medication-MS.
My working theory is that I developed CCSVI which caused decreased brain perfusion; Then my blood pressure went up to compensate for the decreased perfusion, then I got a med to lower my blood pressure which also decreased my brain perfusion which caused my MS to show up.
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Postby belsadie » Wed Mar 31, 2010 8:01 am

Nunzio
I like your theory. I had high BP before those leg cramps but only saw my PCP when the cramping got to me. Stupid, I know. I'm sure brain perfusion accompanied by [what i think happened] the E-B virus being circulated after the varicose vein surgery and triggering the auto immune response is what began the cascade of symptoms. As a child I had herpes sores["kanker sores"] in my mouth. I was told it was thought to be a vitamin insufficiency and I had to drink sauerkraut juice. Of course, that didn't help but I did have the latent virus in my system. Talk about bad luck...... I was also told I always needed alot of sleep[here's that E-B virus again] My symptoms worsened as time went on and I was diagnosed with SPMS about 4 years into the disease process.
Now, CCVSI and treatment that finally makes sense. I guess all those prayers for the researchers worked....!????? Take care
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