Parkinson and MS cured by surgery (but not CCSVI)

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Postby LR1234 » Fri May 28, 2010 6:55 am

I find this CTOS very interesting. I hope that one vascular specialist at least can look into both conditions (CTOS and CCSVI) and its prevelance in MS/Parkinson patients.

I had a MRA recently....I wonder if that would show CTOS???
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Postby Nunzio » Sat May 29, 2010 4:17 am

sonia52 wrote:We spoke of that a few weeks ago. In 2002, I was on two forums where people talked of the scalene surgery. I've lost the link of the Argentinian forum, but I still have the link of the balearic one. There are good explanations in the second message. It's almost all in Spanish, but there is a paragraph in English at the beginning of the message.

http://abdem.mforos.com/474058/2065490- ... leno-ctos/


I was not able to open the above link; I found the link below with english translation that explains Dr. Noda findings and its significance.
http://neurotalk.psychcentral.com/archive/index.php/t-111483.html
But what these doctors do not seem to know and what Fernandez Noda discovered was that this compression also affects the vertebral artery causing a decreased blood flow to the brain and hindering venous return in the cranial area, causing many of the degenerative processes of the central nervous system, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy and some cases of Alzheimer's, among others.
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Postby ssmme » Sat May 29, 2010 6:07 am

Wow, this is really interesting. I want to learn more about ctos.

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Postby Billmeik » Sat May 29, 2010 6:56 am

My sister has parkinsons



Discovery DSALUD. Número 21. Number 21. Octubre de 2000 . October 2000.
Solution for some degenerative central nervous system.

= It has been nearly 20 years that there is a surgical technique fruit of research by Dr. Fernandez-Noda, internationally renowned surgeon who solves many degenerative central nervous system, including Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy or cerebellar ataxia. Technique which, despite being endorsed by more than 1,600 patients operated on, is hardly known by the medical establishment. ¿. Why?.

. And the reason seems obvious: only the intuitive person is able to focus with no apparent problems from new and unexpected solution perspective and find that the facts alleged were not tackled properly. However, in today's world where the scientific field is linked to the economic interests of multinationals and other pressure groups, labor, and the findings of a lone researcher is considered an anachronism out of context that is not valued.

Similarly, in the field of medicine there is an evident stagnation, with a civic institution is hardly conducive to openness and acceptance of those new ideas, experiences and research that do not conform strictly to its guidelines. With just the absence of "valid arguments" and "scientific reasons"-ie, that do not coincide with official truths conjuncturally set-to, systematically, refuses usefulness and validity of new approaches, discoveries, diagnostic systems, therapies alternative and unconventional forms of healing.

Noda - is a perfect example. They correspond to the English expression Cerebellar Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (Syndrome Cerebral Operculum of Thoracic) and refers to pathological compression of the neurovascular structures that sometimes occur at the base of the neck. I will try to explain to the reader the simplest way possible: on both sides of the neck are two regions called the scalene triangle that is bounded by the scalenus anterior, scalenus medius and the rib (see picture). And in between are the subclavian artery, the brachial plexus and the vertebral arteries and internal mammary. Well, sometimes there is a neurovascular compression of these structures causing a malfunction of the nervous structures.


Doctor Fernández Noda . Dr. Fernandez Noda.

So much that most doctors know. But what these doctors do not seem to know-and what he discovered was Fernandez Noda-compression is that this also affects the vertebral artery causing a child reaches the brain's blood flow and hindering venous return in the cranial area, causing many of the degenerative processes of the central nervous system, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy and some cases of Alzheimer's, among others. [/quote]


there's more I just stopped because I got bored.
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Postby Cece » Sat May 29, 2010 7:47 am

http://neurotalk.psychcentral.com/showthread.php?p=605217

has this been posted? Lots of infomation there. It is all in English.

Also CTOS has been renamed: Cerebral Thoracic Neurovascular Syndrome (CTNVS).
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11887092

another link: a chiropractor discusses each CTOS paper in depth...starts halfway down the page:
http://www.upcspine.com/news_vol2_0304.htm#top

apologies if any of this is posted!
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Postby Trish317 » Sat May 29, 2010 8:08 am

More and more, I'm becoming convinced that my darling man's PPMS is a direct result of his broken neck and the four neck surgeries he's had. His symptoms started 30 years ago after the first surgery. After the last one, five years ago, his right forearm went numb and it's been that way ever since.

I believe he needs a doctor who can test and treat CCSVI and CTOS. Because I wouldn't be surprised if he has vein and artery issues.

Now where am I going to find that doctor?
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Postby LR1234 » Sat May 29, 2010 9:27 am

I wonder if Dr Sclafani fancies looking into CTNVS (CTOS) and CCSVI together.


I bet that neck injuries can cause problems with the blood flow through the arteries and veins and result in acquired CCSVI/CTNVS. I also believe that some people are born with these venous/arterial abnormalities.
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Postby Trish317 » Sat May 29, 2010 10:13 am

LR1234 wrote:I wonder if Dr Sclafani fancies looking into CTNVS (CTOS) and CCSVI together.


I bet that neck injuries can cause problems with the blood flow through the arteries and veins and result in acquired CCSVI/CTNVS. I also believe that some people are born with these venous/arterial abnormalities.


I'm certainly not medically knowledgable but I completely agree, LR. Dr. Noda had over 90% of his MS patients improve after the CTNVS procedure. The other people probably had CCSVI.

Maybe I'm oversimplfying it but, to me, the two conditions seem to go hand-in-hand.
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Postby mshusband » Sat May 29, 2010 11:29 am

Has anyone presented this to Dr. Sclafani yet?
Should someone?
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Postby Cece » Sat May 29, 2010 11:39 am

Someone asked, but his response was something along the lines of: I haven't heard of CTOS, what is it? and no one has followed that up...yet. :)
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Postby Nunzio » Sat May 29, 2010 12:21 pm

I actually reply to Dr. Sclafani question and I referred him to this tread. I do not know if he read it or not.
Quote:
sorry but i am not familiar with CTOS. what does this mean?

Cerebellar Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, discovered By Dr. Noda about 20 years ago.
I started a tread about this here
http://www.thisisms.com/ftopicp-98000-.html#98000
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ctos

Postby blossom » Sat May 29, 2010 12:35 pm

i had sent the info. to dr. scalfani a couple mo. ago. well, actually i had a friend do it because of my lack of computer savy. i had talked to holly asked if they were familiar with it and asked if she would try to get it to him. i did notice the other day when it was mentioned that he asked what was ctos. so evidentally he did not get it for some reason or i figured he is so busy just working with the ccsvi issues that it somehow got overlooked. anyway, i am having trouble even getting tested for ccsvi but in my futile quest so far i have been mentioning ctos and ccsvi and took both papers to one dr. and that is my plan. but, if you think trying to get ccsvi accepted is tough well i thought the guy was gonna flip. but i figure maybe better luck next time. i would think that the ctos would require a neurosurgeon or vascular dr. like sclafini which i would think should be able to do both ccsvi and ctos. i wouldn't think that an interventional radiologist could do ctos surgery. does anyone know? i myself like i've been saying at least in my case i feel both would be the ticket. as i stated before dr.'s like noda, castilleo, scafalini and others would be a real DREAM TEAM!! hate to think of the resistance to this theory.
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Parkinson's and MS

Postby UncleB » Sat May 29, 2010 4:44 pm

First, thanks to the people on this website for all the CCSVI info. The information on thisisms.com made it possible for a relative who has MS to be treated and get immediate improvement to his energy level and quality of life.

I am interested in the connections between CCSVI and Parkinson’s disease because my wife has Parkinson’s disease.

I initially thought that the vascular discoveries involved in CCSVI and MS would stimulate research into vascular aspects of PD. But that doesn’t seem to have happened. I know that doctors Haacke and Zivadinov are interested in this area, but from brief contacts with them and others I have found no planned or ongoing studies looking into the vascular aspects of PD. If anyone knows of any such studies, please let me know.

The fact that Dr Zamboni found that the Parkinson’s controls in his studies did not have CCSVI, does not mean that there is no vascular aspect of PD. Zamboni’s studies had to do with veins, not arteries. It may be that abnormal blood flow in arteries, not veins, is involved in PD. Or, it may be that a combination of venous and arterial problems, or some venous irregularity that Zamboni did not look at, is involved in PD.

Dr Noda’s position that Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases are caused by CTOS does support the vascular theory of PD. However, I have not found any other studies confirming Dr Noda’s work referred to in the magazine article cited by Nunzio at the beginning of this thread. Also, the Google translations of the magazine article cited by Nunzio, and the Google translation of Noda’s 1996 article “Neck and brain transitory vascular compression causing neurological complications. Results of surgical treatment on 1,300 patients” are very rough.

Here is a link to an abstract of Dr Noda’s CTOS study of 1300 patients: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10064369

Here is a link to a rough English language translation of Dr Noda’s entire study:
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/he ... essage/870
Destiny, the woman behind the Yahoo forum web site healingparkinsons (see link above) may know where to get the Spanish version of the study.

Does anyone have the link to the Facebook page on CTOS treatment in Chile? I would like to ask them if they do anything for Parkinson’s disease, and if they are aware of studies that support their approach. (I hope they are bilingual as my Spanish is poor.)

There are multi-millions of dollars being spent in Parkinson’s research, but apparently nothing is being spent to see if CCSVI, or an arterial version thereof, has some application to PD. If such research were done it may result in shedding more light on the vascular system’s effects on the brain. This would likely help both PD and MS patients.
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Re: Parkinson's and MS

Postby Trish317 » Sat May 29, 2010 5:02 pm

UncleB wrote:First, thanks to the people on this website for all the CCSVI info. The information on thisisms.com made it possible for a relative who has MS to be treated and get immediate improvement to his energy level and quality of life.

I am interested in the connections between CCSVI and Parkinson’s disease because my wife has Parkinson’s disease.

I initially thought that the vascular discoveries involved in CCSVI and MS would stimulate research into vascular aspects of PD. But that doesn’t seem to have happened. I know that doctors Haacke and Zivadinov are interested in this area, but from brief contacts with them and others I have found no planned or ongoing studies looking into the vascular aspects of PD. If anyone knows of any such studies, please let me know.

The fact that Dr Zamboni found that the Parkinson’s controls in his studies did not have CCSVI, does not mean that there is no vascular aspect of PD. Zamboni’s studies had to do with veins, not arteries. It may be that abnormal blood flow in arteries, not veins, is involved in PD. Or, it may be that a combination of venous and arterial problems, or some venous irregularity that Zamboni did not look at, is involved in PD.

Dr Noda’s position that Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases are caused by CTOS does support the vascular theory of PD. However, I have not found any other studies confirming Dr Noda’s work referred to in the magazine article cited by Nunzio at the beginning of this thread. Also, the Google translations of the magazine article cited by Nunzio, and the Google translation of Noda’s 1996 article “Neck and brain transitory vascular compression causing neurological complications. Results of surgical treatment on 1,300 patients” are very rough.

Here is a link to an abstract of Dr Noda’s CTOS study of 1300 patients: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10064369

Here is a link to a rough English language translation of Dr Noda’s entire study:
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/he ... essage/870
Destiny, the woman behind the Yahoo forum web site healingparkinsons (see link above) may know where to get the Spanish version of the study.

Does anyone have the link to the Facebook page on CTOS treatment in Chile? I would like to ask them if they do anything for Parkinson’s disease, and if they are aware of studies that support their approach. (I hope they are bilingual as my Spanish is poor.)

There are multi-millions of dollars being spent in Parkinson’s research, but apparently nothing is being spent to see if CCSVI, or an arterial version thereof, has some application to PD. If such research were done it may result in shedding more light on the vascular system’s effects on the brain. This would likely help both PD and MS patients.


When I read about the Parkinson's connection, I immediately thought of Michael J. Fox. He has a research foundation.
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Postby whyRwehere » Sun May 30, 2010 1:34 am

Well, until we hear more, I am going to try a chiropractor on my husband in about 10 days. I think the surgery sounds a bit drastic, but I wouldn't rule it out. I had frozen shoulder last summer and was relieved by a chiropractor who adjusted a bone in my neck. When I saw the doctor's TV program about frozen shoulder on youtube, I was amazed that the "expert" was treating it by: MRI, cortisone shot and physio...and if that failed surgery. Geez, I thought, all they have to do is go to the chiro.
Since my husband has played rugby in his youth, there is a good chance of eary trauma...he is also a teacher, which was noted by Noda as being one of the professions likely to suffer these tensed muscles. I'll report back how the chiro visit goes, but I may have to try out a couple before I find a good one.
Anything to improve the flow...within reason...
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