Parkinson and MS cured by surgery (but not CCSVI)

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Parkinson and MS cured by surgery (but not CCSVI)

Postby Nunzio » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:37 pm

I found this article and I almost fell off my chair.
Dr. Noda discovered 20 years ago a condition he named Cerebellar Thoracic Outlet Syndrome which is due to compression at the base of the neck with resulting decrease blood flow to the brain which he fixed surgically.
This is similar to CCSVI but instead of dilating the blood vessel he just relieved the compression.
Another major difference is that he thought it affected the artery.
In the paper you will see him performing an ultrasound of the neck area.
Maybe he was wrong and the compression was really affecting the venous return, but probably it doesn't matter; either way the brain was not receiving enough blood supply.
Original article in spanish: http://free-news.org/jacamp03.htm
English translation: http://translate.google.com/translate?j ... l=es&tl=en
I loved his conclusion which is identical to the CCSVI concept several years later: " And we think that the autoimmune phenomena that occur in some of these processes, particularly in multiple sclerosis-are secondary in nature and not the cause, as currently speculated."
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Postby Motiak » Sat Mar 13, 2010 5:58 pm

From everything I've read, it seems to me like MS is a result of a variety of possible blood flow issues. Some of them are CCSVI, some of them not (especially since it seems that not all MS patients have CCSVI). We'll just have to see how all of this plays out.
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Re: Parkinson and MS cured by surgery (but not CCSVI)

Postby Donnchadh » Sat Mar 13, 2010 6:49 pm

Nunzio wrote:I found this article and I almost fell off my chair.
Dr. Noda discovered 20 years ago a condition he named Cerebellar Thoracic Outlet Syndrome which is due to compression at the base of the neck with resulting decrease blood flow to the brain which he fixed surgically.
This is similar to CCSVI but instead of dilating the blood vessel he just relieved the compression.
Another major difference is that he thought it affected the artery.
In the paper you will see him performing an ultrasound of the neck area.
Maybe he was wrong and the compression was really affecting the venous return, but probably it doesn't matter; either way the brain was not receiving enough blood supply.
Original article in spanish: http://free-news.org/jacamp03.htm
English translation: http://translate.google.com/translate?j ... l=es&tl=en
I loved his conclusion which is identical to the CCSVI concept several years later: " And we think that the autoimmune phenomena that occur in some of these processes, particularly in multiple sclerosis-are secondary in nature and not the cause, as currently speculated."


Amazing, absolutely amazing. The clues were there, but either overlooked or ignored.

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Postby shye » Sat Mar 13, 2010 7:24 pm

going a step further:
In my opinion TOS, CTOS and CTNVS are the result of an upper cervical subluxation and it follows that correction by specific upper cervical chiropractors can relieve myriad symptoms associated with these syndromes without the need for invasive surgery.

from http://www.upcspine.com/news_vol2_0304.htm

I tried the upper cervical chiropractic adjustment of the Atlas and C1, and
am 90+% better immediately!!
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Postby sbr487 » Sat Mar 13, 2010 8:50 pm

Motiak wrote:From everything I've read, it seems to me like MS is a result of a variety of possible blood flow issues. Some of them are CCSVI, some of them not (especially since it seems that not all MS patients have CCSVI). We'll just have to see how all of this plays out.


Motiak,

True. Buffalo study might be hinting about this and could be an indirect endorsement of Dr. Noda's discovery. Hope mainstream will embrace this technique going forward.

It is also possible that CCSVI might be the reason not just for MS but for other diseases. Maybe there are 4-5 underlying conditions and these are the causes for quite a few neuro diseases ...
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Postby SammyJo » Sat Mar 13, 2010 10:12 pm

I have friends with Parkinsons who are getting scanned per Dr Noda's theroy about CTOS. Will post everyone when I hear the results.
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Postby Boreas » Sun Mar 14, 2010 12:15 am

SammyJo wrote:I have friends with Parkinsons who are getting scanned per Dr Noda's theroy about CTOS. Will post everyone when I hear the results.


What I'd like to know is: Do people ever suffer from both conditions? MS and Parkinson? Has ever anybody heard about a person as unfortunate as that?
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Postby suze » Sun Mar 14, 2010 3:53 am

Damage in MS is venocentric, I think. It seems logical therefore that veins are involved.
Does anyone know, as I can't find anything, whether damage in Parkinsons or Altzheimers or other neurological diseases shows a pattern related to veins or arteries?
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Postby Nunzio » Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:44 am

my guess is Parkinson is due to decrease arterial blood flow to the basal ganglia which in turn produces less dopamine while MS is due to venous blockage. Maybe some of the cases which require stenting because of outside compression are related to CTOS but not the ones due to valve disorder or agenesis. CTOS might explain why some people report benefit from chiropractive manouvers.
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Postby Cece » Sun Mar 14, 2010 9:39 am

interesting find
Last edited by Cece on Sun May 23, 2010 5:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Trish317 » Sun May 23, 2010 10:08 am

It appears that Dr. Noda's research and discoveries were received by the same deaf ears as CCSVI.

I wonder if the wonderful doctors involved in CCSVI research, testing, and treatment are completely aware of CTOS. It seems to me that the conditions might go hand-in-hand.
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Postby Nunzio » Sun May 23, 2010 10:52 am

stranger73 wrote:My husband had the MR venogram of the cervical vessels a few days ago. His nurse called yesterday to let us now that everything is normal.
Today we received report, and i don't understand it. Can anybady
explain to me if this may mean narrowing of veins:
MRV of the brain is within the limits of normal.
No evidence of dural venous sinus thrombosis or AVM is noted.
MRV demonstrates normal flow signal within the intenal and external jugular veins.
Note is made of extrinsic compression of the internal jugular veins in the region of the lower neck and thoracic inlet secondary to hypertophied bilateral sernocleidomastoid muscles.

This was taken from another tread, but the test was called normal even though at the end it showed classical signs of CTOS.
It might be nice for the radiologist to learn about CTOS
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Postby Trish317 » Sun May 23, 2010 11:00 am

Nunzio wrote:
stranger73 wrote:My husband had the MR venogram of the cervical vessels a few days ago. His nurse called yesterday to let us now that everything is normal.
Today we received report, and i don't understand it. Can anybady
explain to me if this may mean narrowing of veins:
MRV of the brain is within the limits of normal.
No evidence of dural venous sinus thrombosis or AVM is noted.
MRV demonstrates normal flow signal within the intenal and external jugular veins.
Note is made of extrinsic compression of the internal jugular veins in the region of the lower neck and thoracic inlet secondary to hypertophied bilateral sernocleidomastoid muscles.

This was taken from another tread, but the test was called normal even though at the end it showed classical signs of CTOS.
It might be nice for the radiologist to learn about CTOS


I agree completely, Nunzio. I'm so interested in all this because of my darling man's four neck surgeries to fuse the cervical vertebrae and remove scar tissue. The surgeries were performed at the Mayo Clinic. The last one was in 2005, two years before his PPMS diagnosis. It lasted 12 hours and left his right forearm numb. It still is, five years later.

To me, it's all more than coincidental.
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Postby blossom » Sun May 23, 2010 11:37 am

i totally, totally agree that there could be people that have both problems. myself being one of them. but what do you do? i have brought this up for yrs. haven't found any of the dr.'s interested yet. even now, that ccsvi is out there look at te resistence. i too hope the great dr.'s that are testing and treating ccsvi take a look at this. maybe they are and we're just not aware. i just hope i can just get tested and treated soon for ccsvi and see what that does for me.
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Postby Trish317 » Sun May 23, 2010 11:52 am

blossom wrote:i totally, totally agree that there could be people that have both problems. myself being one of them. but what do you do? i have brought this up for yrs. haven't found any of the dr.'s interested yet. even now, that ccsvi is out there look at te resistence. i too hope the great dr.'s that are testing and treating ccsvi take a look at this. maybe they are and we're just not aware. i just hope i can just get tested and treated soon for ccsvi and see what that does for me.


I'm praying for you, Blossom. I read your post the other day saying that you're 63. You aren't much older than my darling man and me. I turned 57 in March and he'll be 59 in November. Oh, by the way, I call him "my darling man" because we aren't married. In fact, right now we have a long distance relationship which adds more stress to the situation.

Anyway, I think that now that the "cat is out of the bag" on CCSVI, it's opened up many more avenues of exploration. To me, and I'm sure to many others, it seems that things are moving at a snail's pace. But really, if you think about it, it's all happening very quickly. I believe it's partly because of the internet (thank you, Al Gore.... For anyone who doesn't know, that's a joke. At one time, our esteemed, former Vice-President said that he invented the internet. lol!....well, I digress).

Keep believing, Blossom. It's going to happen for you. I just know it.
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