CCSVI and Low Blood Oxygen

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: CCSVI and Low Blood Oxygen

Postby Serlos » Fri Feb 08, 2013 11:43 am

Saturation of oxygen in blood isn't a problem in MS, but metabolic:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22252237

J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2012 Mar;32(3):403-12. doi: 10.1038/jcbfm.2011.191. Epub 2012 Jan 18.
Characterizing brain oxygen metabolism in patients with multiple sclerosis with T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging MRI.
Ge Y, Zhang Z, Lu H, Tang L, Jaggi H, Herbert J, Babb JS, Rusinek H, Grossman RI.
Source
Department of Radiology, Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA. yulin.ge@nyumc.org
Abstract
In this study, venous oxygen saturation and oxygen metabolic changes in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients were assessed using a recently developed T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging (TRUST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which measures the superior sagittal venous sinus blood oxygenation (Yv) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), an index of global oxygen consumption. Thirty patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 30 age-matched healthy controls were studied using TRUST at 3 T MR. The mean expanded disability status scale (EDSS) of the patients was 2.3 (range, 0 to 5.5). We found significantly increased Yv (P<0.0001) and decreased CMRO(2) (P=0.003) in MS patients (mean±s.d.: 65.9%±5.1% and 138.8±35.4 μmol per 100 g per minute) as compared with healthy control subjects (60.2%±4.0% and 180.2±24.8 μmol per 100 g per minute, respectively), implying decrease of oxygen consumption in MS. There was a significant positive correlation between Yv and EDSS and between Yv and lesion load in MS patients (n=30); on the contrary, there was a significant negative correlation between CMRO(2) and EDSS and between CMRO(2) and lesion load (n=12). There was no correlation between Yv and brain atrophy measures. This study showed preliminary evidence of the potential utility of TRUST in global oxygen metabolism. Our results of significant underutilization of oxygen in MS raise important questions regarding mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and neurodegeneration of the disease.


Occlusion in veins maybe affect oxygen stress in brain's cells as its says above... Low saturation of oxygen is seen in arteries stenosis... not in veins. The toxic metabolic products (the tide is limited) have major effect for brain physiology.

Best regards
Konrad
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Re: CCSVI and Low Blood Oxygen

Postby 1eye » Fri Feb 08, 2013 12:52 pm

This is not indicating CCSVI. I have seen similar unexplained results somewhere. I think it indicates blood is retaining oxygen until it becomes venous, and is not being consumed by their brains. The venous blood has high oxygen, not low. They suggest a mitochondrial disorder, but maybe it is related to the missing capillaries found by Zivadinov.

How does this line up with the imaging done by Haacke, Hubbard, etc.?
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Re: CCSVI and Low Blood Oxygen

Postby Cece » Fri Feb 08, 2013 1:16 pm

Could be impairment of transport of oxygen and nutrients across the blood brain barrier. If oxygen is having difficulty getting across the blood brain barrier, then there would be decrease in use of oxygen as seen in the study with more oxygen left in the straight sinus.

Hypoxia with oxygen right there. Like dying of thirst next to a lake because you can't get to it.
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Re: CCSVI and Low Blood Oxygen

Postby 1eye » Fri Feb 08, 2013 5:07 pm

Apparently there is abundant oxygen in "MS" veins. That goes against the idea that Dr. Zivadinov's other result of more collateral veins is a response to not enough oxygen in solution in their usual routes.

They are there to provide an alternate channel for returning blood. Between them and the vertebrals, we seem to not even use the jugulars when upright. I still wonder about that. Means for most, the damage of CCSVI happens when prone.

I would like to know more details on these new methods, and how they stack up with BOLD, and what oxygen compounds are being detected. The free oxygen, if not consumed, will combine with just about anything, sometimes making bad stuff. If it stays in blood cells, the blood would not turn as blue. I seem to have the opposite problem: lots of blue in my blood.

One doctor told me you might have high iron as a response to low oxygen (more carriers for the oxygen). If venous blood has high oxygen, would that mean less iron? Maybe the oxygen is in non-iron compounds, and cannot be used by respiration?
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