Connective Tissue Disorders, Collagen and CCSVI

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: Connective Tissue Disorders, Collagen and CCSVI

Postby Ruthless67 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 3:54 pm

Ok, this is going to be a rambler. Chlamydia Pneumonia just keep coming up in my research into MS. As a matter of fact, following the breadcrumbs of research is how I ended up at Tim’s back in 2009.

The article below states that CP is responsible for the macrophages’ cell walls becoming immobile, they accumulate in the blood vessel walls, setting the stage for atherosclerosis.
(hardening of the arteries)

So………..is there a connection here? Are we the hosts for the viruses/fungi’s that, as parasites, are over time, the cause of these shifts & changes in our veins.

My oldest brother was born with a fugal growth on his feet that took over 14 years to diagnosis that turned out to be a Staphylococcus infection. When I was born, I was diagnosed with severe eczema. Was my mom the carrier? Did we get these parasites in vitro? Do they manifest differently from individual to individual even in a family?


Re: Collagen shifts in vein walls found in CCSVI
Quote from Cheerleader
“Also wanted to restate what Dr. Dake said about Jeff's veins that has stayed with me...he said he'd never seen anything like them before, that they seemed "sticky". I think this vascular wall remodeling and potential collagen shift may be a very important part of the equation. And addressing endothelial dysfunction and NO may be part of the solution.”

Could Jeff’s sticky walls have been macrophage that were made rigid and unable to move? Is it similar or related to the collagen shift? Could taking Echinacoside/Echinacea help?
Chlamydia pneumonia

Chlamydia pneumonia Responsible for Atherosclerosis
Posted on August 22, 2012

Chlamydia also are intracellular pathogens, meaning that they can only grow and reproduce inside of another cell.
Cholesterol connection
One of the keys lies in the macrophages’ cell walls, which store cholesterol and usually tightly control it.
But when it’s infected with C. pneumoniae, the microbe traffics cholesterol from the macrophage cell membrane to its own, causing a change in the macrophage that makes it rigid and unable to move.
The bacterium also disturbs the macrophage’s production of toxins in a process that transforms them into “signaling molecules,” which support functions that keep the bacterium alive.
“C. pneumoniae really wants to hijack the cell functions for its own use, like a parasite would,” he says. “The macrophage, though, wants to kill Chlamydia, but its killing ability has been converted to signaling.”
This is the reason the infection becomes chronic, Azenabor says. “Because of signaling, everything else in the human cell is still fine except for the altered toxins, so the bacteria can reproduce in a short time.”
As the macrophages become immobile, they accumulate in the blood vessel walls, setting the stage for atherosclerosis.

Infection and pregnancy

How is Chlamydia trachomatis, the species that causes a sexually transmitted disease, involved in the occurrence of spontaneous abortions or miscarriages?
Trophoblasts act like macrophages in many ways, and their functions are mediated by the hormones estrogen and progesterone. And cholesterol is the molecule used to produce those hormones.
Azenabor’s research shows that, like its cousin, C. trachomatis does take cholesterol from the trophoblast, and it also reproduces once inside the cell.
“It’s the same old story,” says Azenabor. “Only this time the attacked cell is a trophoblast instead of a macrophage, and the depleted cholesterol hinders production of estrogen and progesterone instead of altering toxin production.”


http://www.naturalhealthschool.com/echinacea.html#2
Polyphenols found in Echinacea were found to protect collagen from free radical damage.

The SDS-PAGE pattern of native collagen is markedly modified by free radical attack, with formation of a great number of peptide fragments with molecular masses below 97 kDa: in the presence of microM concentrations of echinacoside, there is a complete recovery of the native profile. Collagen degradation was, in fact, dose-dependently inhibited by all the compounds, with the following order of potency: echinacoside approximately chicoric acid > cynarine approximately caffeic acid > chlorogenic acid, with IC50 ranging from 15 to 90 microM. These results indicate that this representative class of polyphenols of Echinacea species protects collagen from free radical damage through a scavenging effect on reactive oxygen species

Echinacoside is a natural phenol. It is a caffeic acid glycoside from the phenylpropanoid class. It is constituted from a trisaccharide consisting of one glucose and two rhamnose moieties glycosidically linked to one caffeic acid and one dihydroxyphenylethanol (hydroxytyrosol) residue at the centrally situated rhamnose. This water-soluble glycoside is a distinctive secondary metabolite of Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea pallida (to about 1%) but only occurs in trace amounts in Echinacea purpurea. It is also isolated from Cistanche spp.
It was first isolated by Stoll et al. in 1950 from the roots of Echinacea angustifolia. It shows weak antibiotic activity in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococci.[1]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eczema - Eczema has increased dramatically in England as a study showed a 42% rise in diagnosis of the condition between 2001 and 2005, by which time it was estimated to affect 5.7 million adults and children. A paper in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine says Eczema is thought to be a trigger for other allergic conditions. GP records show over 9 million patients were used by researchers to assess how many people have the skin disorder.
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Re: Connective Tissue Disorders, Collagen and CCSVI

Postby Ruthless67 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 5:49 pm

What I didn’t tell you yet, is my mother had Kidney Disease. After the birth of my brother, she had to go back to the hospital and have one kidney removed, then she gave birth to me just 13 short months after my brother.
So again, I wonder if some of our (parasitic) type problems aren’t passed along in Vitro.


Kidney International Official Journal of the International Society of Nephrology
Symposium on Divalent Ions in Renal Failure
http://www.nature.com/ki/journal/v4/n2/ ... 7389a.html
Conversely, changes in collagen metabolism in chronic uremia and lower than normal values for urinary hydroxyproline have been attributed to a gradual replacement of collagen by elastin-like fibers [24] which are relatively deficient in hydroxy-proline.

The osteosclerosis has also been attributed to a dialyzable "collagen stimulating factor" [23]. Conversely, changes in collagen metabolism in chronic uremia and lower than normal values for urinary hydroxyproline have been attributed to a gradual replacement of collagen by elastin-like fibers [24] which are relatively deficient in hydroxy-proline (Table 1).
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Re: Connective Tissue Disorders, Collagen and CCSVI

Postby cheerleader » Wed Jan 23, 2013 7:40 pm

Hi Ruthless, good to hear from you!
Cpn is certainly part of the puzzle for many. Dr. David Wheldon suggests taking a Cpn challenge test with NAC.
http://www.davidwheldon.co.uk/NAC.html
Jeff did this several years ago, Cpn hasn't been an issue for him, but it's implicated for many, and may well be part of your family's issues. Dr. Wheldon's wife Sarah posts on the antibiotic thread...she's a real expert on this. Dr. Thibault in Australia is studying how Cpn affects the venous lining and CCSVI. http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2011/s3399100.htm
It can be a puzzle, unravelling all the factors. Hope you find yours! Lots of good ideas in your posts.
Jeff's jugular veins are still open and flowing, now almost four years with no MS progression--so we don't really know if his "sticky" veins/altered collagen/endothelial dysfunction have changed. But he just got back from a trip where he down hill skied at altitude (!) and he's feeling great. His serum numbers are all really good and his gray matter looks normal on MRI. We hope and pray his good health continues.
take care!
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: Connective Tissue Disorders, Collagen and CCSVI

Postby Ruthless67 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:15 pm

Cheer,

Thanks for the info & leads. More interesting reading for me.

It is a puzzle, isn't it. I definately think there is something to this for my family. I will read the links you provided.

By the way, when I saw Dr Dake back in 2009, to read the MSI results, I do have multiple collaterals. In vetro malformations? Possibly, and maybe the root cause of those malformations came not from CPN invaiding the egg sac but it's cousin, C. trachomatis?

Lora

If the mother is a host of these species, she is probably passing it along to her offspring.
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Re: Connective Tissue Disorders, Collagen and CCSVI

Postby Ruthless67 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 9:39 pm

Found this very good link with video on CPN.http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/3572695.htm
CATALYST ARCHIVE
Thursday, 23 August 2012
Narration
It has to be said that not all patients have had the same success as Vicki, and there’s a fifty per cent chance that her veins will narrow again. Dr Thibault agrees with Zamboni that MS is a vascular condition. But he also believes that narrowed veins are caused by a chronic infection, and like David Wheldon, his focus is on Chlamydia Pneumoniae.

Dr Paul Thibault
CPN is on my hit list because it is the bacteria that fits all the requirements. It is known to affect the lining of blood vessels and in particular, veins. It is known to involve the nervous system, is able to cause immune effects. So it fits all the features that we actually see in the symptomatology of MS


So I have dusted of my 2007 copy of Ann Boroch’s book, Healing MS. I want to share her statement on page 33 “Candida albicans overgrowth and it’s by-products (mycotoxins) are the primary cause of MS”

Sounds familiar to me, both CPN & Candida. “fit all the features that we actually see in the symptomatology of MS.”

I'm going to go read Dr. Wheldon's wife Sarah's posts on the antibiotic thread and then re-read Ann's book. For me, they are a couple more pieces to fit into my personal puzzle.

Thanks again.
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