Kuwait didn't wait.....

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Postby frodo » Fri May 07, 2010 9:31 am

cheerleader wrote:
frodo wrote:What is there is simply no increase in real incidence but in reported incidence? Some years ago there was no possible diagnosis before death, and at that time it really didn't matter. What if we are only seeing an advance in diagnosis?


Possible...but this has happened VERY quickly (in the last 10 years) and there was diagnosis in place in Kuwait, as evidenced by the published research.
cheer


MRI started to be used in the 80's and only in private clinics of rich countries. And for sure only in urban areas. Probably people in rural areas are only recently started to be diagnosed. I think it is not too much time
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Postby cheerleader » Mon May 10, 2010 7:29 pm

Actually--the dramatic increase happened from 1993-2000...I don't believe that was due to better diagnostics.


Department of Neurology, Ibn Sina Hospital, Safat, Kuwait. alshubaili@hotmail.com
The epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is undergoing dramatic changes; MS is occurring with increased frequency in many parts of the world. In this retrospective study, we examined the changes in incidence and prevalence of MS in Kuwait in the period between 1993 and 2000. We analyzed the records of patients with clinically defined and laboratory supported MS. The total incidence rate increased from 1.05/100,000 population in 1993 to 2.62/100,000 in 2000. The increased incidence of MS was most pronounced among Kuwaiti women (from 2.26/100,000 in 1993 to 7.79/100,000 in 2000. The total prevalence rate increased from 6.68/100,000 in 1993 to 14.77/100,000 in 2000. It was much higher for Kuwaitis (31.15/100,000), as compared to non-Kuwaitis (5.55/ 100,000), in a complete reversal of the pattern observed before 1990. The prevalence was also higher among Kuwaiti women (35.54/100,000), as compared with Kuwaiti men (26.65/100,000). In conclusion, the incidence and prevalence of MS in Kuwait has increased between the early and late 1990s with no signs of leveling off. In a geographic area that was previously associated with low prevalence, local environmental factors may be responsible for these dramatic changes.


http://www.ccsvikuwait.com/

I still believe endothelial disrupters and higher obesity rates may very well be playing into this scenario....


But, in the oil-rich Gulf state where scorching summers keep people indoors, this appetite for excess is taking its toll. Kuwait is one of the fattest nations on earth -- and it is affecting people's health.
Just over 74 percent of the population is overweight, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) and this "obesity epidemic" is contributing to a rise in heart disease and diabetes.

WHO says around 14 percent of Kuwaitis currently suffer from diabetes and it is on the rise.
"[Being] overweight and obesity have been gradually increasing for the past 15 years," Nawal Al Hamad, Head of Nutrition at Kuwait's Ministry of Health, told CNN.
The underlying causes are complex, but an abundance of food and sedentary lifestyles are major factors, according to Hamad.


In the venous paradigm of MS, saturated fats, lack of vitamin D, lack of exercise and obesity are vasoconstrictors and endothelial disrupters....could certainly make MS worse (as well as other autoimmune disorders) This is so sad...our global community needs to deal with this epidemic.
link to article

cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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plumbing problem - omega 3 like antifreeze

Postby hwebb » Mon May 10, 2010 8:37 pm

in addition to thinking about endothelial disruptors and vasoconstrictors, I think it's useful to think of the effect of diet on veins from a plumbing point of view.

Many people with MS have extremely narrow veins, as opposed to blocked veins. Unsaturated fats simply flow better through narrow pipes, than saturated fats do....even in the cold (such as an airconditioned, or naturally cold environment).

Nature has recongised this. High omega-3 content is found in cold-water fish, as opposed to fish which live in warmer water. Similarly, flax seed originating in Canada (with it's cold nights) has a higher omega-3 content than flax seed grown elsewhere. Unsaturated fats such as Omega-3 are like anti-freeze..allowing blood to remain low viscosity and flow through narrow vessels - even in cool environments.
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Re: plumbing problem - omega 3 like antifreeze

Postby cheerleader » Mon May 10, 2010 9:00 pm

hwebb wrote:Unsaturated fats such as Omega-3 are like anti-freeze..allowing blood to remain low viscosity and flow through narrow vessels - even in cool environments.


LOVE the antifreeze/low viscosity analogy, hwebb. So right. Dr. Swank was really onto something, huh? No wonder his patients did so well for such long periods of remission. Great point- the high sat. fat fast food diet newly introduced in Kuwait isn't doing them any favors...
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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the perfection of Nature

Postby hwebb » Mon May 10, 2010 9:58 pm

I always think that God got it right every time. He gave Omega-3 to cold water fish, and to canadian flax seed - so they could thrive in their natural climate. Scientists will forever be inspired by Nature, and marvel at its perfection.
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Kuwait - thanks for showing us the way

Postby hwebb » Thu May 13, 2010 2:53 pm

In addition to having the compassion to promptly treat PwMS using this minimally invasive procedure, and having the nous to recruit the world's most skilled and knowledgeable professional CCSVI advisors,

http://www.ccsvikuwait.com/Details.aspx?d=9

the Kuwait ccsvi team have raised the bar by posting venogram images on their website as they treat patients:

http://www.ccsvikuwait.com/Details.aspx?d=10

This scientific transparency is to be commended !
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Nutritional excess or deficiency not always obvious

Postby hwebb » Thu May 13, 2010 3:04 pm

maybe a little off-topic, but sometimes the cause of a nutritional deficiency (or excess) is not obvious. In Australian in recent years, iodine deficiency has become prevalent. Oddly, the reason for this is because Australians drink a lot of milk.
Local dairy farmers used iodine to sterilise milk containers and milking teats with iodine-based compounds, which contaminated the milk. Iodine levels got so dangerously high that in the 1990s, dairy farmers were forced to limit their use of iodine. Over the last five years they've switched to chlorine-containing cleaning products instead. At the same time, our tastes have been changing. For health reasons, we drink less milk and we eat less salt - and the salt we do use is mostly not iodised. And salt in prepared foods - now the major source of our salt - is almost always not iodised.

http://www.abc.net.au/health/thepulse/s ... 496781.htm
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Postby Ali888 » Fri May 14, 2010 6:08 am

I contacted Dr. Sinan in Kuwait. He says that the procedure in Kuwait is only performed on Kuwaiti citizens but they can arrange for this Canadian to have the testing and treatment done in Egypt or Bahrain.

Has anyone here looked into having this done in Egypt? If so, please share your findings.

I am looking everywhere and am tempted...I really want to go to Euromedic...but still dont even have an approximate wait time.
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Postby Shannon » Sat May 15, 2010 3:31 pm

Well, there is no obesity whatsoever in my family. My Mom and Dad were both beanpoles all their lives and are only now getting the "older people" bellies. However, their diets have never been very good, i.e. southern style fried foods, etc. Also, I am pretty sure that my Mom smoked during the entire pregnancy, and I have no idea about prenatal vitamins. I think that there may have been malnutrition involved, which could also be the case in these areas where the western diet is seeping in and people aren't getting their proper nutrition. :?
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Postby ms2009 » Sat May 15, 2010 6:08 pm

Ali888 wrote:Has anyone here looked into having this done in Egypt? If so, please share your findings.

I am looking everywhere and am tempted...I really want to go to Euromedic...but still dont even have an approximate wait time.

I asked Dr. Sinan and it seems the cost in Egypt is about $7000 USD.
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Postby Johnson » Sat May 15, 2010 6:22 pm

Re: saturated fats. I have been vegetarian for 44 years. Never liked chocolate bars, chips, cookies, cake, etc. I have high intake of Extra Virgin olive oil, fish oils... I'm not convinced of the fats angle.

Ali888 - I have very good feelings about Dr. Sinan, and would definitely seek treatment with him - but Poland is up for me. He does not seem overwhelmed yet. He is in consultation with Doc. Sclafani, and I have the impression that they respect each other. And we like Doc. Sclafani...
My name is not really Johnson. MSed up since 1993
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Postby zinamaria » Sat May 15, 2010 10:03 pm

re:sat fats...there is much evidence of blood viscosity, thicker blood and high intake of sat fats, also in chinese medicine oils heat the body, which in turn can become inflammation. johnson, that you were a vegetarian all those years means it is likely your intake of sat fats was never high to nill which would support the oil theory, (swank's studies) because you never ate red meat, the highest in sat fats.
cakes, cookies, all of that would be in the category of trans fats, which are harmful as well for other reasons, mainly to do with toxicity in heating oils, unlikely there are many sat fats as much as the other fats, hydrogenated oils etc which are really harmful, and your lack of consumption would again support the oil theory.
i suspect also that you have a very high metabolism, and it is cautioned with the 'oil' theory for so many maladies, to keep oils at a minimum in relationship to low/high physical output. but i know i have always consumed more oils than my body could metabolize, which is my suspicion with over consumptive countries especially in the more affluent countries where there is higher intake of meat and dairy, like perhaps what may be occurring in kuwait.
the oil theory affects many more people than those of us with ms...

z
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Postby cheerleader » Mon May 17, 2010 4:50 pm

zinamaria wrote:
the oil theory affects many more people than those of us with ms...

z


You are right, zinamaria--
new research show how high fat meals IMMEDIATELY affect asthmatics--



May 17, 2010 -- People who have asthma should avoid heavy, high-fat meals because it can inflame their airways, a new study says.

Such meals appear to inhibit relief provided by the common asthma medication Ventolin, generically known as albuterol, Australian researchers report.

They recruited 40 people with asthma. Some received a high-fat, high-calorie meal of fast food hamburgers and hash browns containing about 1,000 calories, 52% of which was fat; others ate a low-fat, low-calorie meal of reduced fat yogurt, containing about 200 calories and 13% fat.

The scientists collected sputum samples before patients ate and again four hours later, and analyzed the samples for inflammatory markers.

People who had eaten the high-fat meal had reduced response to the bronchodilators, compared to people who had eaten fewer calories and less fat.

“This is the first study to show that a high-fat meal increases airway inflammation, so this is a very important finding,” says study author Leslie Wood, PhD, a research fellow at the University of Newcastle in Australia. “The high-fat meal impaired the asthmatic response to albuterol. In subjects who had consumed a high-fat meal, the post-albuterol improvement in lung function at three and four hours was suppressed.”

The people who ate the high-fat meal had an increase in airway neutrophils, the most common type of white blood cell and one of the first to arrive at an infection site, the researchers say. They also had a marked increase in activity of a cell surface receptor called TLR4 that is activated by fatty acids.

According to the researchers, TLR4 senses the presence of saturated fatty acids, causing cells to respond as if they have been invaded by a pathogen and leading to a release of inflammatory mediators. This increase in the activity of TLR4 suggests that dietary fat is a cause of inflammation.


Woods says in a news release that evidence suggesting that a high-fat meal changes the asthmatic response to albuterol was unexpected and needs more study.

“We also are investigating whether drugs that modify fat metabolism could suppress the negative effects of a high fat-meal in the airways,” Woods says. “If these results can be confirmed by further research, this suggests that strategies aimed at reducing dietary fat intake may be useful in managing asthma.”

Prevalence of asthma has increased dramatically in western countries in recent decades, suggesting that an environmental factor, such as food consumption, could trigger or aggravate an asthma attack.


link to article

A direct link between saturated fat and inflammation--via neutrophils--white blood cells of the immune system...the body responds to saturated fat as though it was being invaded by a pathogen!

This brings me back to the research showing how fast food has changed Kuwaitis' health--increasing autoimmune disease. More dots to connect.
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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