Thyroid and bloodflow

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Thyroid and bloodflow

Postby sumsum » Sat Apr 24, 2010 1:01 am

I was wondering if there might be a connection between thyroid problems and an alteration of the bloodflow pattern that might result in leasion building.

Without having symptoms, I was diagnosed to have a hypofunction of the thyroid in January 2009 and was given medication. At first I wasn't taken this issue seriously and did not take the medication every day. In Summer 2009 the dose was put up by another doctor because he thought that even though my thyroid hormone level was now "normal" a higher dose might even "improve" things (I didn't feel any better or worse than before starting the treatment by the way). It was only one to two months later that I developed the first "MS symptom", a never constant tingleling feeling of my left side which, after an MRI of the brain and upper part of the spine, led to the diagnosis.

Mentioning a hypothetical link with the thyroid hormones was always declined by my neurologist.

However, if MS is linked to bloodflow problems, that might change the picture since the thyroid hormones also influence blood pressure.

Any thoughts on that?

:?
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Postby LR1234 » Sat Apr 24, 2010 2:24 am

I also started on thyroxine a few months before my MS got worse. I always had something going on for many years before taking the thyroxine but there is a possibility it made things worse with the MS.
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Postby shye » Sat Apr 24, 2010 8:42 am

sumsum
could just be that with the thyroid not functioning well at all, all body processes were at low level, yet already "damaged", and the MS symptoms showed only when your body started to get into a better homeostasis. Don't know.
I do think the type of medication for thyroid is imp. Many MSer's seem to have hypothyroid (I do).

What kind of dr would "fool" around with the thyroid even after the bloods showed it had stabilized??????? You want it stable, NOT in high rev.
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Postby IHateMS » Sat Apr 24, 2010 11:09 am

i was just tested for hyperparathyroidism, no results yet
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Thyroid nodules

Postby anamishguy » Sat Apr 24, 2010 11:28 am

I have an appt for an ultrasound on Monday for nodules that the doctor felt while checking my thyroid.
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Postby sumsum » Sat Apr 24, 2010 11:29 pm

I just found it rather interesting that both illnesses, hypothyroid and MS came along with me in such a short period of time. Some forms of hypothyroid are considered autoimmune diseases, as is MS by neurologists.

Maybe a stupid question (I admit, my medical knowledge is very limited

:D ), but aren't the jugular veins maybe passing through the thyroid or are linked to the thyroid? So if there is a problem with your jugulars this might not only affect the brain, but also the thyroid...?

Just a wild guess :wink:
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Postby Algis » Sat Apr 24, 2010 11:49 pm

Close enough: the superior and middle thyroid veins connect to the internal jugular while the inferior thyroid veins connect the left branchiocephalic vein.

Hope this help :)

BTW:

http://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp92 ... _Veins.jpg
Last edited by Algis on Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby sumsum » Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:19 am

Thank you Algis!

So if there is a blockage at a particular point in the jugulars this might affect the functioning of the thyroid, no?

This could explain why so many people with MS also have thyroid problems - if one considers CCSVI to be the explanatory factor.

Lots of ifs and coulds in these sentences...I am really curious to see how research on CCSVI will link up (an if) with thyroid issues in the future.

Have a good day everyone!
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Postby Algis » Sun Apr 25, 2010 3:26 am

This could explain why so many people with MS also have thyroid problems - if one considers CCSVI to be the explanatory factor.


I don't know dear....

But if we take away MS from neurologists/immunologists and thyroid problems from endocrinologists we gonna get flamed even more

:roll:
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Postby sonia52 » Sun Apr 25, 2010 4:19 am

Thyroid problems are very frequent in the general population : one person in 20 in Canada. In my family, it's about one in 4. I have been dx with MS 30 years ago and with hypothyroidism 3 years ago. I'm the only one with MS in my large family.

Many symptoms of hypothyroidism are similar to MS symptoms, so we don't easily suspect that we have something wrong : fatigue, increased sensitivity to cold, muscle cramps, paleness, depression, poor concentration, bad short-term memory, low temperature, etc.
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Take your temp to check hypothyroidism

Postby Ruthless67 » Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:31 am

Morning all,

If anyone is interested here is a way to test your thyroid at home. I use internet site/suggestions like this so that I can take these finding to my doctor and open up dialog with her and see where we ultimately end up.

Keep a thermometer beside your bed. When you awaken in the morning, before moving around (yes, even before you make a trip to the bathroom), tuck the thermometer snugly in your armpit and keep it in place for 15 minutes. Keep as still as possible. Then, remove the thermometer, take a reading, and write down the results.
Follow this procedure for three days, then determine an average reading by adding all three readings together and dividing by three. If you're average temperature is below 97.5 degrees F., in all probability you are suffering from sub clinical hypothyroidism and should discuss your findings with your doctor.
Of course, as mentioned before, this test is not to be used to replace any needed medical tests or attention to problems you may have. http://www.healthynewage.com/339161.html

Today my morning reading was 95.4, but that was a half hour AFTER going back to bed. (I had to PEE!!!!!!!!) So I probably should start with a new First reading tomorrow.
Lora
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assessment on thyroid part of drug trial design

Postby hwebb » Sun Apr 25, 2010 11:07 pm

my thyroid drainage would be impaired, as my stenosis is above the thyroid (long way up actually). Wonder if this means side-effects of particular MS drugs are more or less likely to hit me?

The drug companies should be forced to correlate the stenosis degree/position with positive/negative effects of their potions. In future, drug trials should include this in their design.
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CCSVI Thyroid problems

Postby belsadie » Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:41 am

Good Day to All,
I, too, have hypothyroid. and was told by the Endocrinologist that she's often seen a correlation with thyroid problems and autoimmune conditions.
Here's my only thought on this: We could use a possible thyroid/venous connection to have the jugular regions visualized. CCSVI...... Sounds good to me.Once the evidence is there, you could build a case for intervention.
Might be worth a try!
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Postby Ruthless67 » Mon Apr 26, 2010 6:59 am

OK,

So I used the thermometer under my arm pit correctly on three mornings.

95.4
96.1
95.4
_______
286.9 divided by 3 = 95.6

So that means my temp. is below the 97.5 and indicates that I should be checked for hypothyroidism............interesting.

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Re: Thyroid and bloodflow

Postby sou » Mon Apr 26, 2010 9:00 am

sumsum wrote:It was only one to two months later that I developed the first "MS symptom", a never constant tingleling feeling of my left side which, after an MRI of the brain and upper part of the spine, led to the diagnosis.

Mentioning a hypothetical link with the thyroid hormones was always declined by my neurologist.

However, if MS is linked to bloodflow problems, that might change the picture since the thyroid hormones also influence blood pressure.

Any thoughts on that?


Low thyroid function results to slower metabolism.

Higher thyroid function results to faster metabolism and increased energy production. But this raises the demand for oxygen and produces more toxic byproducts. Place these byproducts in a body with compromised blood flow and see what happens...

sou
Shortest joke: "We may not be able to cure MS but we can manage its symptoms."
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