Interesting article from Newsweek

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Interesting article from Newsweek

Postby beerduff » Sun May 16, 2010 3:07 pm

Vascular surgeon Jeffrey Isenberg, now at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and colleagues were studying how the gas nitric oxide promotes blood flow. They discovered a pathway that inhibits nitric oxide and thus impedes blood flow. By blocking the blocker—to football fans, adding an extra guard to your offensive line—the scientists got nitric oxide to open blood vessels again and increase blood flow, at least in lab animals. The molecule that works this magic is a protein called thrombospondin-1, or TSP1, suggesting that this particular offensive guard might be a potent drug for saving heart-attack victims; restoring blood flow in patients with severe diabetes, in which impaired blood flow leads to gangrene; and treating hypertension.

Full Article

http://www.newsweek.com/id/238078
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Postby cheerleader » Sun May 16, 2010 3:12 pm

Cool they found that protein, beer--that's great news! It's all about EDRF---endothelial relaxing factor--or Nitric Oxide. In 1998, the Nobel in medicine went to the docs who discovered that it is nitric oxide (formerly thought to be just a pollutant) is actually EDRF-- which takes care of vasodilation, coagulation and the immune system.

Ignarro and Furchgott presented their results to a skeptical audience at a conference at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, in July 1986. Ignarro felt that not "a single person" in the audience believed them, but when the data were published in both 1987 and 1988, opinion swung their way. Moncada clinched the argument in an important 1987 paper. In this widely cited article he unambiguously showed that NO was made by endothelial cells. First, he measured the amount of NO produced by a known relaxant (bradykinin) acting on cultured endothelial cells. Then he added exactly that amount of NO to a blood vessel and showed that the added NO could cause a full relaxant response. Thus, the actions of NO could explain the actions of EDRF. A commentary accompanying Moncada's paper described these findings as "the climax of one of the most exciting sagas in vascular physiology and pharmacology."


http://www.beyonddiscovery.org/content/ ... .asp?I=370

I learned all about EDRF when studying the endothelium, in relation to the health of the blood brain barrier. There's a connection here--and we're getting closer every day.
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby beerduff » Sun May 16, 2010 3:32 pm

Thank you for the link Cheer.
This jigsaw is certainly beginning to take shape.
I do realize the article only briefly touched on the topic.
I thought it would be interesting to the members to show the complex issues in trying to get a cure for any disease.
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Postby rssugg » Sun May 16, 2010 4:06 pm

i have always thought about this when i see nitric oxide boosters at GNC....can that be beneficial to Ms folks?
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Postby NormB » Sun May 16, 2010 4:57 pm

The way is I see all this (as Beerduff quoted the "jigsaw") in my own twisted logic, is much like a ladder with rungs. As of today the rungs are parsed largely in between so here is what I see;




Top of ladder where MS is completely cured.





Myelin repair and associated










Neurologists and their futile belief
that MS is an immune only problem.













CCSVI where the patient is treated
albeit at their level of disease stage
but most importantdly stops progression
at all stages (so far we know)
but could make us jump to the myelin
repair stage rung.









Congenital? or genes?
Bottom of ladder.







So as of today we can see a lot of rungs missing in between but
the research pointed on this post helps to add to the missing rungs.

Sorry for the format of this message as it is the way I see it.


Thank you and take care all.

Norm
'92 diag RR - '05 SP
On LDN since Sept. 2012 with better quality of life.
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progression

Postby 1eye » Sun May 16, 2010 6:35 pm

I would like to volunteer myself as a subject for a test of CCSVI vs progression. I have recently completed a trial that tested my progression at three-month intervals for more than two years. It was a trial of MBP8298. The standard nine-hole peg test, walking, and PASAT tests were used throughout. I was examined on this quarterly basis by neurologists. My results are probably obtainable, through the company that made Dirucotide, and they also included MRIs I think every six months. So (since I have continued to progress since then, and was in the placebo group) the comparison can be made of any effect Liberation treatment has on my progression. The experimenters can decide ahead of the test, what peg, walking, and/or PASAT performance level will be acceptable as evidence I have or have not progressed, and these same tests can be repeated indefinitely.

This evidence will be anecdotal, but very compelling, since it will be directly comparable to my performance on a study in which Dr. Freedman was directly involved.

Experimenters will be able to see if my performance with CCSVI treatment exceeds my performance on placebo for long enough to eliminate the placebo effect, if it has any bearing on anything. It may not be possible to get all the data from BioMS, but I do think I know of at least one person who also may agree to become a subject.

I have been on no DMDs for at least five years. I will not try to influence the results.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
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Postby tzootsi » Mon May 17, 2010 6:39 am

cheerleader wrote:Cool they found that protein, beer--that's great news! It's all about EDRF---endothelial relaxing factor--or Nitric Oxide. In 1998, the Nobel in medicine went to the docs who discovered that it is nitric oxide (formerly thought to be just a pollutant) is actually EDRF-- which takes care of vasodilation, coagulation and the immune system.

Ignarro and Furchgott presented their results to a skeptical audience at a conference at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, in July 1986. Ignarro felt that not "a single person" in the audience believed them, but when the data were published in both 1987 and 1988, opinion swung their way. Moncada clinched the argument in an important 1987 paper. In this widely cited article he unambiguously showed that NO was made by endothelial cells. First, he measured the amount of NO produced by a known relaxant (bradykinin) acting on cultured endothelial cells. Then he added exactly that amount of NO to a blood vessel and showed that the added NO could cause a full relaxant response. Thus, the actions of NO could explain the actions of EDRF. A commentary accompanying Moncada's paper described these findings as "the climax of one of the most exciting sagas in vascular physiology and pharmacology."


http://www.beyonddiscovery.org/content/ ... .asp?I=370

I learned all about EDRF when studying the endothelium, in relation to the health of the blood brain barrier. There's a connection here--and we're getting closer every day.
cheer


Watch out for Nitric Oxide - it can be a double edged sword. Here are a few excerpts from various papers on Nitric Oxide and MS:

In recent years, nitric oxide has been implicated in the development of MS. In the vascular system, nitric oxide acts as a dilator, expanding arterial walls and lowering blood pressure. In the central nervous system, however, nitric oxide generates free-radical byproducts that contribute to myelin destruction and the loss of nerve function (Smith KJ et al 2002). The picture is complicated, however, by the fact that nitric oxide also has good effects in MS, including modulating the immune system (Smith KJ et al 2002). Studies hoping to manipulate nitric oxide production have yielded mixed results in people who have MS. Research is ongoing.

Excess nitric oxide (NO) in the brain released by microglial cells contributes to neuronal damage in various pathologies of the central nervous system (CNS) including neurodegenerative diseases and multiple sclerosis.
Results suggest that NO and nitrogen-derived oxidants may play a role in the initiation of demyelination in acute-MS lesions but not in the later phase of the disease.
Green Tea suppresses both TNFa and NO Nitric Oxide.
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Postby cheerleader » Mon May 17, 2010 7:27 am

I never suggested anyone take nitric oxide as a supplement....my suggestions/program first posted on TIMS were to repair oxidation stress and create a healthy endothelium by balancing nitric oxide (and EGCG is part of it)----here's the paper I wrote back in 2008, which is how I met the doctors at Stanford--

http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=123456602210
HTH,
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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