Significant: not just hyoxemic but hypoglycemic brain cells

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Postby Cece » Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:10 pm

PCakes wrote:lay explanation of the brain - carbohydrate connection http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/carbs.html

From your link:
Glucose is the only fuel normally used by brain cells. Because neurons cannot store glucose, they depend on the bloodstream to deliver a constant supply of this precious fuel.

It's as simple as that.

I am still wondering, using anorexia as an analogue if in both situations the brain is not receiving an adequate amount of glucose and nutrients, exactly how does the cerebral atrophy occur in anorexia? I have found research showing that the atrophy in anorexia can be reversible when proper eating is restored; what if some of the atrophy in MS is reversible?
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Postby 1eye » Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:13 pm

oog
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
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Postby PCakes » Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:43 pm

Cece wrote:From your link:
Glucose is the only fuel normally used by brain cells. Because neurons cannot store glucose, they depend on the bloodstream to deliver a constant supply of this precious fuel.

That statement certainly stood out.

Cece wrote:It's as simple as that.

I agree! no blood no brain.
The CNS is a fighter. Damaged nerves can take months, sometimes years, to repair. Given the chance, with proper blood flow/nutrients/oxygen supply the possibilites are endless.
The same would apply to atrophied muscles. Why not brain tissue?


blossom, H.P., 1eye as always :D
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Postby kc » Sat Aug 28, 2010 9:11 pm

When I was first dx'd in 96 my blood sugar kept crashing thru the floor. It has been much much much better since my procedure. I only need to eat like 3 times a day and I used to have to eat 6 or so times a day.

It has been 7 weeks for me and my friend commented on how much more confident I seem while driving (and also how much faster I am going).

I used to crave crave crave candy and always felt so much better after eating it. I knew it had something to do with the whole mess.

Great post.kc
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Postby Fernie12 » Sun Aug 29, 2010 5:43 am

Just b4 my dx, I had dropped like, 30 lbs - over about a year's time, but I was not changing my diet or exercise routine. I thought I'd get dx with diabetes, but nope...I was a bit perplexed (but happy to have dropped the weight!) After my dx of MS, I kinda have attributed it to my dropping of weight, but didn't really understand it at all. None of my Drs. commented when I brought it up to them either...
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Postby Blaze » Sun Aug 29, 2010 6:59 am

Thanks Cece for posting that. Many years ago (maybe 15? ), I was tested and found to have borderline hypoglycemia. I was referred to a dietician. Since then, I have been following a diet of five or six small balanced meals per day, rather than three larger ones.

It has helped somewhat with my energy challenges from MS, but most of all it has taken away many of the "jitters" that I used to get. If I don't eat every couple of hours, I become weak, shaky and tired and my concentration and mental faculties plummet.

Even though I'm a chocoholic, I usually stay away from the simple carbs like candy and cookies and eat whole grains or fresh fruit instead with some protein. Not as much fun as chocolate, but I feel much better.

If I eat candy or cookies, within about a half hour, I am even more shaky and tired. I understand these may give a quick hit of sugar, but will wear off very quickly.
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Postby PCakes » Sun Aug 29, 2010 12:06 pm

Further support of your decreased blood flow = atrophy hypothesis...

Bernhard Juurlink published a hypothesis in 1998 that MS is related to decreased blood flow in the brain and spinal cord.

"It was very difficult to get anyone interested in this idea -- the idea was easily testable by, for example, looking for blood flow in white matter in MS patients," Juurlink said in an interview this week. "I tried to first interest clinical colleagues to image brains of MS and non-MS patients, to look at blood flow, with no success."
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Postby PCakes » Sun Aug 29, 2010 12:12 pm

Hi Blaze..I find my sugar cravings spike when I am really tired, not eating properly or fighting a virus (I crave icecream when I am sick).. makes sense. . the old brain reaching out for a quick fix.
I'd have to guess that this might not be unique to the MS populace.
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Postby Bethr » Sun Aug 29, 2010 1:46 pm

I have two specialists who suspect porphyria and one who suspects MS.
(Both can cause brain lesions).
I have been following a Porphyria diet for over six months.
You have to eat Carbs regularly, like every few hours, and if you think you are feeling worse you need to pack glucose to avert the attack. For those who get into an acute episode and end up in hospital they are given IV glucose. Porphyria attacks can be brought on by dieting or missing meals, stress, drugs etc.

I am feeling a lot better for it. There are certain foods to avoid also.
I'm also being investigated for polycythemia (thick blood that can lack oxygen). The plot thickens! Polycythemia is treated with phlebotomy to lower iron levels. Ironically, I have been self-treating with phlebotomy since January 2010, as it got rid of my fatigue. Funny how it is all starting to add up.
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Postby lyndacarol » Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:26 am

The topic of Ambrotose by Mannatech was discussed several years ago in the Natural Approach forum. Using the "search" feature allows a person to find possible previous discussions.

http://www.thisisms.com/ftopic-1513-day ... ch-15.html

I found the post by ElmerPhd on page 2 to be especially helpful.
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Postby Cece » Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:37 am

Heat can also cause blood glucose levels to fluctuate; it's something diabetics have to watch out for.

So if the idea is that the refluxing deoxygenated and deglucosed blood along with slowed perfusion causes less blood glucose to be available to the brain, and heat affects overall blood glucose levels, then that may be one of the factors causing MS heat intolerance.
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Postby LR1234 » Sun Sep 12, 2010 3:06 pm

I got worse when I cut out sugar from my diet.

I was still eating wholegrains and trying to stabilise my sugar levels but couldn't.

Had really bad attacks of hypoglycemia (2.3 average on glucose monitor) especially after a meal (reactive hypoglycemia)plus had attacks of vision loss.

I had to have high sugar drink/food to reverse the attacks quickly and had to put my head in between my legs (if you know what I mean) to make blood run to head so I wouldn't faint and reverse the vision loss.

I am back eating sugar again but have stepped up my complex carbs plus I am eating more potatoes/root veg and I feel sooo much better for it.
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