CCSVI and CCVBP

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby coach » Sat Nov 05, 2011 8:35 am

I think I may have difficulty in convincing my husband that UP right mri is the way to go. He's convinced that the mri I had at Emory is sufficient and that the NS there who is the head of NS is infallible and his opinion should not be questioned. Seems like I'm between a rock and a hard place.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sat Nov 05, 2011 9:03 am

Coach,

One cost effective option you have is to contact Dr. David Harshfield Jr. in Little Rock, Arkansas and find out what it would take to have him evaluate your current brain scans for a possible Chiari 1 malformation (cerebellar tonsillar ectopia). Dr. Harshfield has been doing research with Dr. Scott Rosa into the relationship between CTE and MS. Harshfield is more in tune and much more thorough in evaluating mechanical problems in the spine such as you have.

You may have to do it through your primary provider to get reimbursement.
Last edited by uprightdoc on Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby coach » Sat Nov 05, 2011 12:46 pm

Thanks Dr. Flanagan. I'll see what I can do.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Sat Nov 05, 2011 12:50 pm

Hi Dr.'s,
Is the rotation that we hear about, between C1 and the skull or between C1 and C2? After typing that I now think it could be both.

I hear the term rotation used so often and I am also wondering how the adjustment is differentiated between the two. Or to put it more bluntly when I have my adjustments it was in my opinion 'inaccurate' in the method. Is only one vertebra moved and if one is 'adjusted' it must effect the adjacent vertebra in regard to rotation in particular?

I also guess that the pressure on C1 when the adjustment is done means that only it is moved.

It is the rotation aspect that is of interest though as 'in my opinion' it is what is most likely to effect blood and CSF flow. Therefore it would need to be 'precise' and I would imagine that after such an adjustment it could be re xrayed for accuracy?

I may be a little pedantic on this, I come from a world where things are measured in very small amounts with precise equipment and those distances can mean life or death.

And the other aspect is that I have not had benefit from the adjustments I have received 'as yet'.

Have a wonderful day,
Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sat Nov 05, 2011 2:15 pm

Hello Nigel,

Atlas or C1 mostly rocks forwards and backwards with some degree of sidewards movement to the left and right as well as rotation. Most of the rotation in the cervical spine occurs around C2. With that in mind the base of the skull and C1 and C2 are a functional unit and are likewise are connected to the alignment and function of the rest of the cervical spine. Correction can be achieved by working on C1 or C2 but most UC doctors prefer C1 because of leverage and greater control it provides. Different upper cervical methods use different methods for determining the specific line of correction or vector to push or thrust along to make the correction.

Rotation of the upper cervical spine is just one aspect that can affect blood and CSF flow. A backwards curve in the neck called kyphosis also changes the spinal canal and can affect flow. Chiari malformations can also affect flow and they can be caused by upper cervical misalignments, head tilts and tethered cords among other things.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Sat Nov 05, 2011 2:54 pm

Thanks Dr,
So what part is personal skill and experience and what part is accuracy and measurable outcome?

I guess that there is an optimum spinal alignment that is visualized by xray etc, and there is inherent reason for alignment to settle to a common set or position.

The balance or optimum for wellness of an individual seems to me to be such a loose, wait and see, sort of airy fairy, she'l be right, it will ride up with wear type of science.

I think I am expecting to find whether I have adjustable issues that effect my health, or whether I need to move to the next experiment for wellness. Vascular assessment and a new set of maybe/ we'll try this and see, type scenarios?

Bit frustrated, and simply want to stop the progression and the ultimate, to heal!
Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Nov 06, 2011 1:50 am

Nigel, All the elements of skill, experience, accuracy and measurable outcomes come together as in any profession.

In my opinion you have orthopedic musculoskeletal problems affecting your brain and cord. There is a good possibility you have a Chiari 1 or functional Chiari. Chiari malformation cause displacement and deformation of the contents of the cranial vault which can affect blood and CSF flow as well as tension, compression and shear stresses on nerves. Whether those problems can be corrected with chiropractic care or not is another story. You are a tough case. You need someone with a sound method, excellent skills and plenty of experience on par with Dr. Dickholtz of NUCCA.

As I suggested to coach you could have a radiologist like Dr. Harshfield evaluate your current scans for a possible Chiari 1. Vascular studies would also be helpful as would upright MRI phase contrast cine CSF flow studies. Upright MRI flexion and extenison views of your cervical spine would also be helpful.

Vascular intervention is always an option but it won't change a Chiari 1 malformation if you have one.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Sunnee » Sun Nov 06, 2011 2:10 am

Uprightdoc,

I know you are interested in this kind of stuff, you might find the following of interest yeah! you may know about it already, I found it interesting

I know off topic but very interesting, could it be Atlas related
Public release date: 1-Sep-2011
[ Print | E-mail | Share ] [ Close Window ]
Contact: John Pontarelli
john_m_pontarelli@rush.edu
312-942-5949
Rush University Medical Center
Signs of aging may be linked to undetected blocked brain blood vessels
Many common signs of aging, such as shaking hands, stooped posture and walking slower, may be due to tiny blocked vessels in the brain that can't be detected by current technology.
In a study reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers from Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, examined brain autopsies of older people and found:
Microscopic lesions or infarcts — too small to be detected using brain imaging — were in 30 percent of the brains of people who had no diagnosed brain disease or stroke.
Those who had the most trouble walking had multiple brain lesions. Two-thirds of the people had at least one blood vessel abnormality, suggesting a possible link between the blocked vessels and the familiar signs of aging.
"This is very surprising," said Dr. Aron S. Buchman, lead author of the study and associate professor of neurological sciences at Rush. "The public health implications are significant because we are not identifying the 30 percent who have undiagnosed small vessel disease that is not picked up by current technology. We need additional tools in order to identify this population."
In 1994, the researchers began conducting annual exams of 1,100 older nuns and priests for signs of aging. The participants also donated their brains for examination after death. This study provides results on the first 418 brain autopsies (61 percent women, average 88 years old at death).
Although Parkinson's disease occurs in only 5 percent of older people, at least half of people 85 and older have mild symptoms associated with the disease.
Before the study, researchers believed that something more common, such as microscopic blocked vessels, might be causing the physical decline. The study's autopsies found the small lesions could only be seen under a microscope after participants died. The lesions couldn't be detected by current scans.
During the annual exams of the nuns and priests, researchers used the motor skills portion of a Parkinson's disease survey to assess their physical abilities. Researchers observed and rated the participants':
•Balance
•Ability to maintain posture
•Walking speed
•Ability to get in and out of chairs
•Ability to make turns when walking
•Sense of dizziness
"Often the mild motor symptoms are considered an expected part of aging," said Buchman, who is also a member of the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center. "We should not accept this as normal aging. We should try to fix it and understand it. If there is an underlying cause, we can intervene and perhaps lessen the impact."

###
Co-authors from Rush are Sue E. Leurgans, PhD; Dr. Sukriti Nag, PhD; Dr. David A. Bennett, and Dr. Julie A. Schneider, MS. The National Institutes of Health and the Illinois Department of Public Health funded the study.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Nov 06, 2011 5:25 am

Terrific article Sunnee. I discuss vascular Alzheimer's and Parkinson's in my first book. Among other things, my next book will be covering the likely role of chronic ischemia and strokes, such as from small vessel disease and other causes, in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, MS and others.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Sunnee » Sun Nov 06, 2011 6:35 am

Uprightdoc,

Theres a guy called Noel Batten from Australia , he also has certain beliefs re Parkinsons, he sent me a dvd on his Parkinson work with a patient, check him out, you may find it of interest.


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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby silverbirch » Tue Nov 08, 2011 7:51 am

Hey there Dr Flanagan

- Im loveing the upright MRI is their any contacts for the UK who support upto speed with us MSERS ?

Im doing well still going to Dr Heidi although I feel the need to book in for a correction Im feeling a bit woosey and when Im driveing if I twist my head - funny feeling cars flying past rain distance hopeing a flick of the wrist will sort this out !!!!

Twisted Sister
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Tue Nov 08, 2011 8:19 am

Hello Silver,
Nice to hear from the other side of the pond. Thanks for the update. It's encouraging for others.

It sounds like twisted sister is up to her old shennanigans again. A little flick of the wrist and some shopping will straighten her out.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Sunnee » Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:34 am

Uprightdoc,



Can whiplash cause a lesion on the brain?



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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby silverbirch » Tue Nov 08, 2011 10:01 am

uprightdoc wrote:Hello Silver,
Nice to hear from the other side of the pond. Thanks for the update. It's encouraging for others.

It sounds like twisted sister is up to her old shennanigans again. A little flick of the wrist and some shopping will straighten her out.


I have been attending Dr Heidi for nearly 12 months now thanks to yours truly xxxx

The West End is a shocker on the purse strings ! although its lovely being there in the hub of the festivities minus the MILLIONS of shoppers on Oxford Street. Dr Heidi cost me alot more than what ya think.... when one takes a peek in Harvey nicks , liberties and the old faith full John Lewis

Im loveing the upright MRI...... but Dr Flanagan is their any contacts in your little red book for scanning upright here in the UK ??? and in addition to scanning is upto speed with us die hard MSERS as were taken
no prisioners
?
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Tue Nov 08, 2011 10:27 am

I am not familar with scanning facilities in the UK. The other problem is that even if they had upright scanner they would have to become familiar with phase contrast cine MRI to check blood and CSF flow. Additionally, many radiologists overlook Chiari 1 malformations and other relevant issues to upright posture.
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