CCSVI and CCVBP

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby blossom » Sat Nov 26, 2011 7:34 pm

dr. flanagan,

not meant to take away from the uppercervical thread here. but i was reading awhile back on one of your postings elsewhere that the pelvic was of importance because the spine i think you said balanced there. with me, you told me of my pelvic problem and what to do. which did help some of the odd numb coldness in my lower extremities and i'm sure effected even more. after dr. weimer adjusted pelvic and the spine up to the neck then i went to nucca. now, the nucca dr. said he would not care if i had my back adjusted as long as it was below the belly button. i can understand to a point where he's coming from. but---

i recall you saying you prefered to work on the total spine in given situations. i lean that way.---i agree totally about the cervical as my experience with that. but the spine the total spine has issues and needs help. is that where the decompression tables would come in and lets say one might get the most bang for your buck?

i've got to for sure get rid of the spurs and stenosis. but for me and others here there are a lot of battle wounds that have accumulated that will or should be addressed so as to have the best chance of gaining back what we can for the better.

by the way as you describe your weekend feast----i am drooling-----and it is not caused from a so called ms symptom. enjoy!!
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sat Nov 26, 2011 9:23 pm

NZer1 wrote:Thanks for these blog comments, it paints a picture that is hard to ignore. The problem is that Mainstream and even our Director of Technique Chiropractic in NZ are just not interested in discussing any of this.

I am lost for words, I am surprised at the lack of interest in these case studies, your book and other papers that are available.

It seems to me that it will take a group of passionate people to go through your file of data and articles and assemble it a way that cannot be ignored.

It seems to me that everyone has a piece to the puzzle, some in their story and others because of the articles they have kept over time. Is this something a publisher, editor, brainstorming group, Cece (TiMS) could pull together so it is in one place and well presented, like the work of Marie Rhodes with her book CCSVI as the Cause of MS.

Frustration has me thinking we are sitting on our hands and not wanting to do this well. As though we are holding the cards too tightly and need to ask and find the 'magic' person to put this together and other(s) to lead the education


Thanks Nigel the pasta was terrific.

I understand your frustration. I have been writing about and treating these types of cases for decades. I prepared myself well before taking on the establishment but I was't prepared for the lackluster performance from chiropractors.

The cases presented here are just part of a long list. Here is a case from comments on my wordpress blog of a young male with optic neuritis, loss of vision and MS following a bicycle accident years earlier.

Dear Dr. Flanagan,
I have a 21 year old son who was diagnosed with MS about a year and half ago. He suffers from bilateral optic neuritis so severely that he has lost his independence ( he had to turn over his drivers license recently and needs assistance with daily tasks) A crushing blow for a young man who once had the world by the tail! He has had treatment for CCSVI (70 % stenosis of his left jugular) and seen some improvement in mental clarity and fatigue. We are firm believers in this theory, however I am still not satisfied and refuse to stop researching possible additional causes/treatments to help him! I know there is answer out there and I want to do everything possible to assure his quality of life!!
Austin was in a bicycle accident as a teenager and lost consciousness for several minutes and I have read on your site that trauma of this sort may be a cause.
Needless to say, I am extremely interested in looking into upper cervical chiropractic care to possibly help his condition. Do you know a doctor in the Midwest (we live in Ohio, but are willing to travel) that you would recommend contacting?
Thank you so much for your drive and dedication!
I consider people like you a gift from God!
With much appreciation,
Kelly
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Sun Nov 27, 2011 1:02 am

Thanks Dr.
I have had a long day and in that time had peace to think.

I believe that the turning point is going to require allot of work from the patients as much as from the Practitioners.

The data required needs to cover the 'normals' as much as it needs to cover the afflicted.

The Nurses study may be a way to show what is happening in our population.(Off the top of my head I cannot link to it).

The difficulty in 'proving' anything in the Medical work is based around what is normal, before looking at any thing that is presented as cause for 'not normal'.

This is where most theories fall over.

Until there is a comparison between the two we are up *hit creek without a paddle. No one will listen to belief without contrast. Many of the examples you have presented paint a picture that most can see. The reality is that there are too many logical reasons for it not to be true, as you found from the court case. Until there is before and after, time line data on the spinal/injury involvement there will be no support.

It is the same for CCSVI there needs to be a comparison before mainstream acceptance 'believes' that there is benefit from free flowing veins. The outcomes of PTA alone is not going to be enough to have main streamer's believe that there is QOL from free flowing veins.

Mainstream wants nothing less than before and after, there is no other way for acceptance to occur. Technology cannot support the belief. IMO.

So finding the historic data such as the nurses study and looking at what is recorded from day one and progressively, the outcomes may be the only to forward this.

The way main stream looks at this whole situation is not wrong IMO, it is simply throat cuttingly frustrating that it will be the only way, as you now doubt have already come this place in knowing a long time ago.

Time to eat and then rest, my meal may not be quite the same visually as yours, though it will be wholesome,
Regards Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Nov 27, 2011 4:59 am

Nigel,
As Bob Dylan wrote, You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows. We have several weather stations in our house. Sometimes they say it's raining when it's not and sometimes they show sunshine when it raining. The problem is that they are electronic devices and are based on differentials between pressure and humidity. When in doubt I just look outside like people have done for millenia.

Poorly designed studies and weak hypotheses regarding the cause of MS haven't stopped doctors from prescribing dangerous drugs. Epidemiological studies, such as the nurses study you mentioned, are notoriously fraught with errors. Physiological studies that measure function such as blood and CSF flow etc., make far more sense. Studying an entire population to figure out a subset with a particular problem is needlessly cumbersome, expensive, impractical and ineffective. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand that torn cartilage in the knee can cause inflammation, swelling and pain. You don't need to study the entire population to see the connection. Likewise, torn cartilage and bone spurs in the neck can similarly cause inflammation, swelling in the spinal canal that can affect the nervous system.

The case below involves mutiple whiplashes and MS. I'll let you decide whether it's raining or not.

I am a 41 year old female that has been disabled for more than 3 years. There has been difficulty is diagnosing and my symptoms continue to get worse with activity. I had bad whiplash in 1988, ‘recovered’ from that then started having issues with lifting, arm numbing, headaches, etc. Saw a chiropractor for a few years for my neck and mid-back which seemed to help at the time. Since then I have had whiplash two more times; in Aug. 2006 (mild) and Aug. 2007 (medium). In 2007 I had a water tubing accident where I fell from the tube at high speed and hit the water with my right side so hard that I felt a numb feeling from my waist down for about 1 minute. I seemed to recover from that but starting in summer 2008 I started having great difficulty with expanding my ribcage without severe pain, headaches and the list is long. It progressed over time and now I am left disabled without an answer. Most of my pain seems to be triggered by the use of my right hand. Grasping objects is the worst. Writing will set off muscle spasms all down my right side and I can barely walk after. Not much is showing up on various tests that I have had and I am very frustrated. Has anyone else had this effect from multipe whiplash? I have a lot of joint pain, headaches (back and left side of head), pins and needles in my arms if I sit in one place for 5 minutes of more or when sleeping on my side, various pressure points all over my ribcage and neck, weakness in my right hand and arm, difficulty breathing from rib pain, muscle spasms on right side of body, loss of temp sensitivity in hands, etc.
I have been tested for MS and it came back negative but when they did the MRI for that I had been having a ‘better’ day than normal because I did not do activities before. I am desperate for some answers and would like to get my life back to normal. This has been devestating to not have answers.
Thank-you
Teresa
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Nov 27, 2011 6:56 am

blossom wrote: ... i was reading awhile back on one of your postings elsewhere that the pelvic was of importance because the spine i think you said balanced there. with me, you told me of my pelvic problem and what to do. which did help some of the odd numb coldness in my lower extremities and i'm sure effected even more. after dr. weimer adjusted pelvic and the spine up to the neck then i went to nucca. now, the nucca dr. said he would not care if i had my back adjusted as long as it was below the belly button. i can understand to a point where he's coming from. but---

i recall you saying you prefered to work on the total spine in given situations. i lean that way.---i agree totally about the cervical as my experience with that. but the spine the total spine has issues and needs help. is that where the decompression tables would come in and lets say one might get the most bang for your buck?

i've got to for sure get rid of the spurs and stenosis. but for me and others here there are a lot of battle wounds that have accumulated that will or should be addressed so as to have the best chance of gaining back what we can for the better.

by the way as you describe your weekend feast----i am drooling-----and it is not caused from a so called ms symptom. enjoy!!


Thanks Blossom. The pasta was particularly good this time and the leftovers get even better as they age overnight.

I started with specific upper cervical but spent the rest of my career practicing full spine and all the extremities. There are too many short comings in upper cervical. I also completely disagree with upper cervical doctors who maintain that correcting the upper cervical spine takes care of problems in the lower spine. On the other hand, most full spine methods are non-specific and less effective when it comes to correcting the upper cervical spine. While there are manual ways of decompressing the spine used in sacrooccipital technique (SOT) such as sphenobasilar release maneuvers, occipital and 4th ventricle bulb compression and sacral base pumping, along with specific category pelvic blocking, most chiropractors don't follow proper protocols in using these methods, which renders them far less effective. Even the best manual methods, however, aren't as good as the new latest generation of decompression tables. On the other hand, even the best spinal decompression tables won't correct the upper cervical spine. The two camps in chiropractic have been disrespectfully and foolishly battling with each other for decades. There is a growing number of young doctors, however, that are starting to practice both specific upper cervical and full spine.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Nov 27, 2011 7:16 am

The following is a case of MS associated with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) posted by Ninou way back in this thread.

-- I'm 50 with a secondary progressive MS, edss from 2 to 7 in 5 years. One doctor has detected a Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. What is it possible to do? Liberation treatment ? Surgery ? Other ? I'm living in Europe. I don't have any migraine. No problem of balance, but I can't stand up alone. My left arm is very weak. I cannot lift it alone over 45°. Disappearance of the pulse with the arm raised and an muscle pain with outstretched arm. I don't know what to tell you more about my symptoms. For several weeks, I have the feeling to sleep more and more twisted. I have difficulty extending the fingers of my left hand, but remain flexible. My feet are cold and insensitive. --

Many cases of MS are associated with scoliosis. TOS is also associated with scoliosis and has been further associated with Parkinson's disease. Scoliosis tips the deck of the pelvis, bends the mast of the spine, and tilts the yardarms of the shoulders. This affects the stays or ropes of muscles and conective tissues that link the deck, mast and yardarms together. It also distorts neurovascular connective tissue tunnels and outlets between the neck, shoulders and arms, which can compress nerves and blood vessels. Compression of the veins in TOS can back up into the jugulars. Twists in the thoracic spine can simillarly affect the azygous vein.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Nov 27, 2011 9:20 am

The following case regarding MS and trauma that was taken from a recent comment on my wordpress blog.

Hello,
I find this all very interesting.
My wife was diagnosed with MS in 2000. She has decompensated significantly since that time. She was diagnosed with Remitting recurring MS but I believe that she has now gone to the next level as she never seems to get any relief at any time from the disease.
A little history on her. She was a hairdresser by trade. She spent most of her work days on her feet working in our salon. She collapsed at work one day and was never able to return. Her symptoms included some visual problems, lack of feeling in the extremities, weakness in her legs, coordination problems, extreme fatigue and bladder problems. Some of the symptoms would come and go over time, but now they have persisted continuously. She had some relief through the time that she was pregnant, but other than that she has become progressively worse.
I find it interesting that you mentioned trauma. She was involved i a motor vehicle accident only a few years before her symptoms started to appear. She was actually thrown into the roll bar of a jeep, upon impact. She had recieved several stitches to close a wound on her forehead as well as a mild concussion.
To move forward here. We had gone for the CCSVI screening and she was considered a good candidate for the treatment. It was reported that she has %95 blockage in her left jugular and about %50 in her right.
We then went for the procedure in Cosa Mesa California. There were some problems throughout her procedure. The Doctor had one of the balloons rupture in her left jugular as they attempted to open the vien. They then used a larger balloon and were successful in openning the vien. This was explained to us as being “normal” in all respects.
As for the results of her surgery, she was feeling quite a bit better for the first three weeks. She was able to look down while being a paasenger in the car. This was something that she was never able to do. She had noticeably increased energy levels. She was able to walk short distances without aid. Her bladder had better function. She was able to feel her extremities for the first time in a long time. Her “cloudiness in the head’ went away completely. All seemed to be going great for about three weeks.
I noticed an almost immediate change in her one day. She was decompensating very quickly. The first indication was a severe mood change. She then started to develop the dragging of her foot again, followed by bladder problems and extreme fatigue.
We went back to the imaging center in Vancouver to get a follow up scan done. The new scan showed that she had %100 blockage in her left jugular. They told us that she had developed a blood clot in the left side? This of course has caused us alot of concern. We have contacted the Doctor that performed the surgery and he has put her back on some blood thinners to see if we can disipitate the clot??
I am not so sure that I understand enough of this whole disease and treatment to form any educated answers to the problems?
Anyhow, I was hoping to return her for another attempt at clearing the jugular, but she, and the Doctors seem hesitant to do this yet? I am hoping that you could shed some light on your thoughts surrounding this very frustrating situation for me?
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Sun Nov 27, 2011 3:24 pm

To paraphrase what has been said in general,

Dr, You have observed symptoms that occur after some injuries that may have happened to the upper spine, at this time technology does not identify the cause of the symptoms.

There is however changes from what is perceived as the normal structure by xray and or MRI that have been observed "after the fact".

Some people with these changes have symptoms and others have none. Some develop symptoms over time/years.

There are people with a dx of MS who have history that includes injury and they may have Venus dysfunctions at the same time.

To date there is no connection between the symptoms and the causes that have been theorized.
There is no consistency in cause and effect, although assumptions have been made that there is a percentage change of co-incidence.

That chance is not enough to predict symptoms occurring.

The symptoms commonly spoken of in this discussion are very similar to Transverse Myelitis which has been related to spinal cord disease with various theories of causation.
-----------------------------

I am personally getting to a place in my thinking that we have possibility of symptom management if we investigate spinal structure and alignment, as well as, vascular flows from the brain. That there has been damage done one way or another and that 'may' be treated to delay the symptom progression.
It also in some cases may enable regeneration to some types of the damage done by these problems and the scaring and healing process that has followed over time.
At this time the flows of blood and CSF are suspected to be altered in people with injury and or malformation of vessels carrying these fluids and this is being researched.

Regards Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby blossom » Sun Nov 27, 2011 10:03 pm

dr. flanagan, you say there are a number of young chiro.'s starting to practice specific upper cervical and full spine. how would they advertise? what would they be called? "full spine and body and specific upper cervical?" i've found most will say they do it all. went through that for yrs. -- i've learned more, ask more but these for sure will be like finding hens teeth.

any ideas?

i don't like the idea of one chiro. popping and another cracking. but, i am where i am. i can tell i need both. i'd think it would be of way more benefit if one was doing it all too. that just makes good sence. i am gonna check out the chiro. near here that has a decompression table. i'll bet when i ask him if he can do specific upper cervical the answer will be yes. "of course i'd have my questions." i'm not knocking any in particular. just like this chiro. he did great for my friend's problem but i am very complicated. i can't afford physically or financially to keep switching and there is a lot at stake. i know there are many others in the same boat. your info. has already helped many including me.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Nov 28, 2011 1:17 am

NZer1 wrote:To paraphrase what has been said in general,

Dr, You have observed symptoms that occur after some injuries that may have happened to the upper spine, at this time technology does not identify the cause of the symptoms.

There is however changes from what is perceived as the normal structure by xray and or MRI that have been observed "after the fact".

Some people with these changes have symptoms and others have none. Some develop symptoms over time/years.

There are people with a dx of MS who have history that includes injury and they may have Venus dysfunctions at the same time.

To date there is no connection between the symptoms and the causes that have been theorized.
There is no consistency in cause and effect, although assumptions have been made that there is a percentage change of co-incidence.

That chance is not enough to predict symptoms occurring.

The symptoms commonly spoken of in this discussion are very similar to Transverse Myelitis which has been related to spinal cord disease with various theories of causation.
-----------------------------

I am personally getting to a place in my thinking that we have possibility of symptom management if we investigate spinal structure and alignment, as well as, vascular flows from the brain. That there has been damage done one way or another and that 'may' be treated to delay the symptom progression.
It also in some cases may enable regeneration to some types of the damage done by these problems and the scaring and healing process that has followed over time.
At this time the flows of blood and CSF are suspected to be altered in people with injury and or malformation of vessels carrying these fluids and this is being researched.



Nigel,

As you recall, Dr. Raymod Damadian just did the upright MRI study that showed that of the eight MS case he carefully scrutinized and scanned were all connected to serious cervical and head trauma. One case involved truama dating back thirty years. The symptoms in all cases started after eight years on average as I recall.

http://www.fonar.com/news/pdf/PCP41_damadian.pdf

When I was new in practice I had an Amish lady patient who came in for low back and hip pain. She had four children. She looked slightly short for her size but she was not a dwarf. She also waddled in a peculiar way when she walked like and old man with two bad hips. I was stunned when I took her low back x-rays. Both of her hips were out of the acetabulum (hip sockets) and had formed new joints. When I questioned her further she told me that when she was a young child she was thrown out of a buggy (wagon) which then rolled over her lower torso upper leg area. The Amish at the time didn't go to medical doctors so they treated her at home with bed rest and salves to soothe the pain and reduce the swelling in her legs. Apparently the injuries healed to the point that she could walk and didn't interfere with her four pregnancies and raising four children. The point is there was no direct evidence as to what knocked her hips out of whack because she didn't go to the doctor and no one took x-rays at the time. I suppose the hips could have gotten knocked out of their sockets for a multitude of remotely possible reasons but there was nothing else in her case history that came close. Sometimes the obvious stares you in the face and you have to go with your gut instincts. My guess was that it was most likely due to the carriage accident decades ago.

Dr. Thomas Milhorat, a neurosurgeion has done a great deal of research into Chiari malformations and tethered cords which he connected to scoliosis and MS.

Dr. David Harsfield Jr., a medical radiologist who has been doing cases studies along with Dr. Scot Rosa, an AO chiropractor, said he hasn't seen a case of MS yet that wasn't associated with a Chiari malformation. They also did a study connecting Chiari malformation to trauma as well as upper cervical connective tissue tearing and subsequent misalignment and instability. All this was determined after the fact (trauma) with no prior evidence as most patients don't anticipate getting into accidents so they typically don't have studies prior to the accident.

Lastly, in this regard, there is no direct evidence to support a case for CCSVI either as the venous insufficiency is likewise discoverd many years after the fact.

Suppositions and hypotheses are made in health care everyday but you try to back it up with evidence, logic and biological plausibility.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Nov 28, 2011 1:41 am

Here is another case involving trauma from comments on my wordpress blog.

Hello,
I find this all very interesting.
My wife was diagnosed with MS in 2000. She has decompensated significantly since that time. She was diagnosed with Remitting recurring MS but I believe that she has now gone to the next level as she never seems to get any relief at any time from the disease.
A little history on her. She was a hairdresser by trade. She spent most of her work days on her feet working in our salon. She collapsed at work one day and was never able to return. Her symptoms included some visual problems, lack of feeling in the extremities, weakness in her legs, coordination problems, extreme fatigue and bladder problems. Some of the symptoms would come and go over time, but now they have persisted continuously. She had some relief through the time that she was pregnant, but other than that she has become progressively worse.
I find it interesting that you mentioned trauma. She was involved i a motor vehicle accident only a few years before her symptoms started to appear. She was actually thrown into the roll bar of a jeep, upon impact. She had recieved several stitches to close a wound on her forehead as well as a mild concussion.
To move forward here. We had gone for the CCSVI screening and she was considered a good candidate for the treatment. It was reported that she has %95 blockage in her left jugular and about %50 in her right.
We then went for the procedure in Cosa Mesa California. There were some problems throughout her procedure. The Doctor had one of the balloons rupture in her left jugular as they attempted to open the vien. They then used a larger balloon and were successful in openning the vien. This was explained to us as being “normal” in all respects.
As for the results of her surgery, she was feeling quite a bit better for the first three weeks. She was able to look down while being a paasenger in the car. This was something that she was never able to do. She had noticeably increased energy levels. She was able to walk short distances without aid. Her bladder had better function. She was able to feel her extremities for the first time in a long time. Her “cloudiness in the head’ went away completely. All seemed to be going great for about three weeks.
I noticed an almost immediate change in her one day. She was decompensating very quickly. The first indication was a severe mood change. She then started to develop the dragging of her foot again, followed by bladder problems and extreme fatigue.
We went back to the imaging center in Vancouver to get a follow up scan done. The new scan showed that she had %100 blockage in her left jugular. They told us that she had developed a blood clot in the left side? This of course has caused us alot of concern. We have contacted the Doctor that performed the surgery and he has put her back on some blood thinners to see if we can disipitate the clot??
I am not so sure that I understand enough of this whole disease and treatment to form any educated answers to the problems?
Anyhow, I was hoping to return her for another attempt at clearing the jugular, but she, and the Doctors seem hesitant to do this yet? I am hoping that you could shed some light on your thoughts surrounding this very frustrating situation for me
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Mon Nov 28, 2011 2:00 am

Thanks Dr,
If medicine was based on results there would be an outcome, too many people and corporations are based on financial reward, but not in the wellness industry!

I am focused, like you, on finding the 'X' factor. It has not been an easy road. And the journey is often better than the destination!

There are too many people who have dirtied the water for those that follow.

We will succeed!

Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby civickiller » Mon Nov 28, 2011 4:37 am

NZer1 wrote:Thanks Dr,
If medicine was based on results there would be an outcome, too many people and corporations are based on financial reward, but not in the wellness industry!

I am focused, like you, on finding the 'X' factor. It has not been an easy road. And the journey is often better than the destination!

There are too many people who have dirtied the water for those that follow.

We will succeed!

Nigel


we need a "LIKE" button :thumbup:
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Nov 28, 2011 4:51 am

blossom wrote: ... you say there are a number of young chiro.'s starting to practice specific upper cervical and full spine. how would they advertise? what would they be called? "full spine and body and specific upper cervical?" i've found most will say they do it all. went through that for yrs. -- i've learned more, ask more but these for sure will be like finding hens teeth.

any ideas?

i don't like the idea of one chiro. popping and another cracking. but, i am where i am. i can tell i need both. i'd think it would be of way more benefit if one was doing it all too. that just makes good sence. i am gonna check out the chiro. near here that has a decompression table. i'll bet when i ask him if he can do specific upper cervical the answer will be yes. "of course i'd have my questions." i'm not knocking any in particular. just like this chiro. he did great for my friend's problem but i am very complicated. i can't afford physically or financially to keep switching and there is a lot at stake. i know there are many others in the same boat. your info. has already helped many including me.


Blossom,
Are you trying to tell me that hens don't have teeth?
As far as diet and health are concerned, while the girls in my neighborhood may not have teeth they make some pretty tough eggs that would put a hole in your head if you got hit with one. They are as hard as rocks. I have treated many patients with kidney and gallstones. It's amazing they don't complain passing such huge stones. The whites of their eggs are very creamy not like the watery store bought variety. The ladies are the size of roosters and they run all over the owners property and will eat just about anything their can sink their teeth into. They particularly like bugs and flowers in season and their eggs are delicious. Unfortunately they get lazy and slow down production when the days get short so I'm stuck with smaller eggs until next season. It's not just me though, the foxes are out of luck too.

As for finding a chiropractor that does both upper cervical and full spine it will be very difficult. Fortunately you already know what an upper cervical chiropractor's office looks like and how they operate. To do specific upper cervical you need the right equipment from x-ray to special knee chest or side posture tables.

Not all spinal decompression tables are alike. Some are just basic traction tables and some are junk. Good traction tables are okay. I had several in my office with special features that allowed full body distraction, intersegmental traction, cervical and lumbar traction, shoulder, hip and knee traction and hand traction. I also had a good flexion-distraction table. The latest generation tables are far better to cases like yours and especially cases like Poet and others where different segments of the spine need to handled differently. Be very selective in who you choose to go to.

Interestingly, I just found a chiropractor in NYC that does both. I am sending my tunnel expert brother to him. Two years ago on Thanksgiving he was told he had stenosis of all the major arteries in his heart and needed immediate surgery. The problem is he is in excellent cardiovascular condition. His problems started after a serious bicycle accident while he was crossing over some railroad tracks. He landed on his right side. He was pretty banged up and went to see an orthopedic surgeon. About three months later he started to develop severe left side chest and arm pain but it was non-exertional. The pain would bother him when he was sitting still. He felt better when he moved. After visiting two of the leading university hospitals in NYC and one areas best heart surgeons they all suggested he had serious heart problems and needed surgery. I had him come up for a visit and the chest pain was gone by the end of the weekend. It's two years later and he is back to running and bicycling. He only gets miminimal discomfort from carrying briefcases and luggage when he travels. He needs some follow up care at this time every couple of months. He is tough to work on and specific upper cervical and flexion distraction are a perfect combination.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Nov 28, 2011 5:09 am

The infamous Silverbirch and her other half, "Twisted Sister," posted the following case on this thread that is associated with migraine headaches and MS following a whiplash injury twenty-five years ago.

Silverbirch - As a result of your thread I sourced out Dr F website placed a post and got the name of a Dr Heidi here in the UK appointment 26th October. I’ve had CCSVI collaterals x3 on my left to date. I’ve not had steroids or DMD - I feel that I have re-stenosed. My MS symptoms are mild.
I had a car crash 25 years ago - whiplash - the result of that left me with bad migraines and a very cold right nostril treated with counter meds - (imigrian in later years) I’ve since learned imagrine can cause brain lesions !!! I was popping them a lot even before a long drive pre empting migraine
Any how I had an attack 18mts ago thought to be a stroke then was DX with RRMS. I never got another migraine but got a lovely red rash. But the neck cracking is there I’ve always had a lower bad back and the feeling of a thumb in my right butt since attack my whole right hand side of back is slightly numb, right leg heavy even the right side of my skull is numb highlighted when blow drying my hair in the shower the right side of body is heat sensitive. Vertigo mild but noticeable to me if you can get sitting down vertigo I have it. I also get a weird feeling of vertigo when watching TV, e.g., someone falling off a cliff. This never went away after liberation.
Benefits of liberation: cog fog , facial coloring, body temp normal now prior to liberation always cold I also perspire now. Again my ms symptoms were mild and I was only DX’d with ms 18 months ago with no prior ms symptoms.
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