CCSVI and CCVBP

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 2:23 am

Time and word will get around.
Its hard when all the minds are not interconnecting.

Another article from Franz, I don't have the full article though.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 7786900034
Abstract
Unequal propagation of central venous excess pressure into the different cerebral and spinal venous drainage systems is the rule rather than the exception. The intensity of the forces thus to be exerted on vulnerable cerebrospinal structures by the resulting pressure-gradients in the craniovertebral space is unknown. There is a need to consider the various conditions which may cause individual proneness to heavier reflux into particular cerebral as well as epi- and subdural spinal venous compartments. An attempt is made to indicate eventual consequences of excessive retrograde dilatation especially of internal cerebral veins. The importance of elucidating the neuropathological and clinical implications of undue reflux into the skull or spine is deduced from the probability of relations between localized backflow into the craniovertebral space and unexplicated cerebrospinal diseases. In this regard the features of multiple sclerosis are discussed.
==================

BTW, I am going to Newcastle, Australia on the 29th August, Dr Paul Thibault is doing a Doppler Ultrasound on my neck veins and we will discuss the approach for the CPn brain infection.
Quote;
"Quote's below from Dr Paul Thibault's paper on Vascular involvement in MS, very, very compelling article and a TV release of his findings available soon, Story to air 23rd? August on Catalyst:
http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/

"It's widely accepted that Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The cause of MS is unknown and there is no cure. But some maverick doctors contend that MS is triggered by
an infection which can be treated. It's believed that a common bacterium, Chlamydia pneumoniae, can infect blood vessels in the brain and spinal cord and ultimately lead to nerve damage. Maryanne Demasi meets the doctors who are at odds with neurologists in proposing that an early diagnosis of MS could be cured with something as simple as antibiotics."

According to the producer there will also be a brief reference to CCSVI.

The Quote from Dr Thibault's article;

"Hence, the management of the venous disease
associated with MS will be optimized by a multifaceted
approach directed at both correction of significant
stenoses of the extra-cranial venous
outflow and amelioration of the venulitis, which
on current evidence is most likely caused by a
chronic persistent infection with an organism such
as C. pneumonia. Optimum management of MS
will then involve a complex holistic approach
including optimal antibiotic therapy possibly over
a prolonged period, minimally invasive angioplasty
of significant stenoses, dietary and nutritional management
of metabolic effects including but not
limited to vitamin D deficiency and secondary
focal tissue porphyria, and finally limited use of
immunomodulating drugs at appropriate stages of
the disease."
http://www.cosmeticcentre.com.au/client ... 043331.pdf"

=========================
I haven't had a reply from the Fonar Team in Sydney who are waiting on Dr Damadians reply about the MRI machine they have and if it can be used to do a similar Study if they link Dr Rosa and Joe Ierano

Regards,
Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Wed Aug 15, 2012 3:00 am

I have a different theory. I think that most cases of MS are due to trauma and other anatomical issues. As I have mentioned many times, however, about a third of the cases I have consulted with are migraine variants related to autoimmune-inflammatory conditions. The cause of the autoimmune-inflammatory reactions differ. I have a case now that is related to a former episode of EBV. The EBV, however, was brought on by her particular physiology, her high energy stressful lifestyle and diet loaded with sugar. The combination weakened her immune system and provoked inflammation. I have also treated cases of gluten enteropathy and lactose intolerance etc.. Colon problems, weak stomach acid and digestive enzymes are common causes. Viruses, bacteria and other pathogens don't always cause the problem. They show up because there is a problem and the system is out of balance and weak.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby dania » Wed Aug 15, 2012 3:16 am

Dr Flanagan what do of think of this video? They say the ATLAS can be in one adjustment put back into place permanently.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jajcvFOH6m0
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Wed Aug 15, 2012 5:17 am

The video is an interesting dipiction of the importance of the upper cervical spine. Atlas Profilax, however, brand new method and based on the work of one person who is obviously unaware of and way behind in the science and practice of upper cervical correction. Specific upper cervical chiropractic methods have been around for a long time. It is based on the work and input of many highly trained professionals and is continuing to evolve. The presentation also greatly oversimplifies a myriad of complex issues related to the upper cervical spine such as congenital malformations (AO assimilation, occipitilization, basilar invagination, platybasia, Klippel-Feil etc.) as well as permanet connective tissue injuries and tears resulting in loss of motion or joint instability. It also overlooks even more problems in the lower spine such as irregular or fused segments, spondylosis, scoliosis, kyphosis, stenosis, misaligned pelvis (pelvic obliquity), congenital leg length discrepancies, leg fractures, degenerated hips, excess Q angles and pronated feet to name a few. I am not an advocate for top down theories. I believe the lower spine is equally important to the upper cervical spine. Misalignments of the pelvis can cause problems in the upper cervical spine just as upper cervical misalignments can effect the lower spine.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Daisy3 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 2:38 pm

Hello Dr Flanagan,

Have you noticed a difference in patients and the type of MS they have? I am expecting you to say that RRMS patients respond favorably while PPMS patients don't....I felt it was worth asking the question though!
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Thu Aug 16, 2012 12:43 am

"Multiple sclerosis patients have cognitive deficits and the thalamus plays an important role in cognitive function. The lesions we can see but there is subclinical activity in multiple sclerosis where you can't see the changes," said senior author Narayana. "There are neurodegenerative changes even when the brain looks normal and we saw this damage early in the disease process."
Adjusting for age-related changes in the thalamus, the patients with multiple sclerosis had less thalamic volume than the controls. The amount of thalamic loss also appeared to be related to the severity of disability.
"This is looking at multiple sclerosis in a different way," Hasan said. "The thalami are losing cellular content and we can use this as a marker of what's going on. If we can find a way to detect the disease earlier in a more vulnerable population, we could begin treatment sooner."
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 195019.htm

Does this fit in the picture you have of MS Dr?
I was studying this in the early days and it has come up again.
Regards
Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Aug 16, 2012 1:05 am

Daisy3 wrote:...Have you noticed a difference in patients and the type of MS they have? I am expecting you to say that RRMS patients respond favorably while PPMS patients don't....I felt it was worth asking the question though!


Hi Daisy,
I haven't noticed a difference in how most MS patients respond. Typcially, but not always, the ones that fall into the possible or probable category that are migraine variants in my opinion, have a better prognosis.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Aug 16, 2012 1:17 am

Thanks Nigel. It's new news to me but it certainly fits with any "picture" or theory regarding MS. It will be interesting to see how they correlate it to the degree of severity.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Thu Aug 16, 2012 1:38 am

Another piece of news from FaceBook;
Jenna Mach
Hi Dr. Arata, I am sure you had a chance to see the video and know the theory of Atlas Orthognal; does this have a merit, sounds very convincing and very logical but we have been "showered" with so much logic but nothing seems to be "IT" and yet we go after all what has been served from the "MS ALMOST CURE” Menu. Would appreciate your input, Jenna.
Mike Arata;
Stylocervical compression identified at venography is the most common cause of lack of response with CCSVI treatment. Atlas alignment therapies such as NUCCA seem to relieve stylocervical compression. This leads to conversion of non-responders in most cases. This is the case even if both jugulars are occluded.
https://www.facebook.com/Dr.Arata

Thoughts?

Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Aug 16, 2012 2:46 am

Structural problems in the upper cervical spine can effect the internal jugular and vertebral venous outlets. The styloid process of the temporal bone lies on the lateral aspect of the jugular foramen. It is an attachment point for muscles of the pharynx. Eagle's Syndrome is a rare condition caused by an elongation of the styloid process of the temporal bone that causes neurovascular signs and symptoms. It is possible to reduce musculoskeletal pressure acting on neurovascular pathways such the jugular routes by correcting or improving structural abnormalities and dysfunction in the skull and cervical spine. In addition to working on the craniocervical junction I would also work on the muscles and connective tissues associated with styloid process, as well as the TMJ to mobilize and stretch the surrounding tissues. A team approach will improve patient outcomes.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby dania » Thu Aug 16, 2012 4:41 am

I have been reading that some patients are talking about bulging disks in their necks and some say they are in the spine. Many are wondering if the vagus nerve is affected? Or could they also be pressing on a vein/blood vessel?
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Aug 16, 2012 5:20 am

Cranial nerves 9, 10, and 11 (glossopharyngeal, vagus and spinal accessory) exit the skull through the jugular foramen. The lower cranial nerves are often effected in cases of increased intracranial pressure and diplacement of the brainstem downward in the cranial vault. Downward pressure due to increased intrcranial pressure for example, occurs in tumors and strokes, as well as Idiopathic Intracranial hypertension. Extra-cranial pressure around the jugular foramen can similarly effect the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve is also effected by other musculoskeletal conditions. For example, the carotid sinus contains receptors for the vagus nerve that regulate blood flow to the brain. Increased internal sinus pressure or increased external pressure such as rubbing the carotid sinus decreases heart rate and blood pressure. Musculoskeletal tension such as from the sternocleidomastoid and hyoid muscles can interfere with carotid sinus signals. The SCM is innervated by the spinal accessory nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve innervates the muscles of the pharynx. It also connects to the carotid sinus among other things. I always tested the SCMs for tone, tenderness and strength. The gag reflex is used to test the glossopharngeal nerve.
Last edited by uprightdoc on Thu Aug 16, 2012 6:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby dania » Thu Aug 16, 2012 5:32 am

Thank you.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Aug 16, 2012 9:47 am

Frodo, Please PM me.

Your welcome Dania.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Thu Aug 16, 2012 4:25 pm

Previously Unknown Cleaning System in Brain: Newer Imaging Technique Brings 'Glymphatic System' to Light

"Understanding how the brain copes with waste is critical. In every organ, waste clearance is as basic an issue as how nutrients are delivered. In the brain, it's an especially interesting subject, because in essentially all neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, protein waste accumulates and eventually suffocates and kills the neuronal network of the brain," said Iliff.
"If the glymphatic system fails to cleanse the brain as it is meant to, either as a consequence of normal aging, or in response to brain injury, waste may begin to accumulate in the brain. This may be what is happening with amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease," said Iliff. "Perhaps increasing the activity of the glymphatic system might help prevent amyloid deposition from building up or could offer a new way to clean out buildups of the material in established Alzheimer's disease," he added.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... science%29
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