CCSVI and CCVBP

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Sep 01, 2013 10:33 am

I will take what I can get from the wish list. The more informaiton the better. The upright position is better but again, I will take what I can get. Radiology facilities should have seats or bars you can use to get upright x-ray and MRI views if they have an upright scanner. If you can't get upright views, supine is fine.
User avatar
uprightdoc
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1710
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: USA

Advertisement

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Sun Sep 01, 2013 4:48 pm

Hi Dania,
A question for you,
have the Dr's ever given you steroids as an attempt to improve your symptoms?

I also think that you should be able to get copies of all your medical notes and history from your Dr.
That way even though the Dr is not telling you what they are doing, why they are doing it, or the results there would be some written information for Dr Flanagan and also yourself.

Hope it all comes together for you :)
Nigel
User avatar
NZer1
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1520
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Rotorua New Zealand

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Sun Sep 01, 2013 9:15 pm

Interesting, now that Lyme disease is now studied deeper and like CPn infection bacteria are implicated in spinal issues!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23986790

Damage of collagen and elastic fibres by borrelia burgdorferi - known and new clinical and histopathological aspects.
Müller KE.

Source
Medical Practice for Dermatology, Venerology, Occupational Dermatology and Environmental Medicine, Kempten, Bavaria, Germany.
Abstract



Lyme Borreliosis, or Lyme's disease, manifests itself in numerous skin conditions. Therapeutic intervention should be initiated as soon as a clinical diagnosis of erythema migrans is made. The histopathology of some of the skin conditions associated with Lyme Borreliosis is characterised by structural changes to collagen, and sometimes also elastic fibres. These conditions include morphea, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. More recently, further skin conditions have been identified by the new microscopic investigation technique of focus floating microscopy: granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica, necrobiotic xanthogranuloma, erythema annulare centrifugum, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, cutaneous sarcoidosis and lymphocytic infiltration; these conditions also sometimes cause changes in the connective tissue. In the case of ligaments and tendons, collagen and elastic fibres predominate structurally. They are also the structures that are targeted by Borrelia. The resultant functional disorders have previously only rarely been associated with Borreliosis in clinical practice. Ligamentopathies and tendinopathies, spontaneous ruptures of tendons after slight strain, dislocation of vertebrae and an accumulation of prolapsed intervertebral discs as well as ossification of tendon insertions can be viewed in this light.

KEYWORDS:
Lyme Borreliosis, collagen fibres, connective tissue, diverticulum., elastic fibres, ligaments, skin, tendons
User avatar
NZer1
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1520
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Rotorua New Zealand

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby grandsons4 » Sun Sep 01, 2013 10:14 pm

The thing that immediately caught my eye was the reference to the new microscopic technique, "floating focus microscopy." It's not new; check the date of the following article. Also, take special note of the last sentence. Why hasn't this become the gold standard? My son suspects Lyme, but his neuro said the tests that were done didn't indicate Lyme. (He did have the infamous "band 23.") I guess "easy, quick, and inexpensive" isn't in the reference manual. PMO!
Focus floating microscopy: "gold standard" for cutaneous borreliosis?
Eisendle K, Grabner T, Zelger B.
Source
Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria.
Abstract
Borrelia burgdorferi is difficult to detect in routine biopsy material from patients with skin lesions of borreliosis. In this study, a new immunohistochemical method, focus floating microscopy (FFM), was developed to detect B burgdorferi in tissue sections and was compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By using standard histologic equipment, tissue sections stained with a polyclonal B burgdorferi antibody were simultaneously scanned through 2 planes: horizontally in serpentines and vertically by focusing through the thickness of the section. Borrelia were detected in 47 of 71 ticks, 34 of 66 tick bites, 30 of 32 erythema chronicum migrans cases, 41 of 43 borrelial lymphocytomas, and 50 of 51 acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans cases. FFM proved to be more sensitive than PCR (96.0% vs 45.2%) and nearly equally specific (99.4% vs 100%). All 169 control cases, except 1 false-positive case of secondary syphilis, were negative with FFM. FFM is an easy, quick, and inexpensive method to reliably detect Borrelia in cutaneous tissue sections.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17210530
grandsons4
Family Member
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Wed Aug 14, 2013 7:43 pm

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby 1eye » Mon Sep 02, 2013 7:47 am

grandsons4 wrote:I guess "easy, quick, and inexpensive" isn't in the reference manual
In my biz we used to have an expression: "RFM". Since Steve Jobs has made Zen so famous, the FM has decreased even more in popularity. I have not been able to find a copy. Other than an antique one on motorcycle maintenance, and another even weirder one by some guy named Grey whose drawings are sometimes found on Wikipedia, I have been limited to what I could find on the Inertnet.

uprightdoc wrote:Oppenheim and Chaddocks are variations of Babinski done on the lateral malleolus and medial tibia. Hoffman's sign is done by flicking the middle fingertip and watching for flexion of finger muscles. The calf doesn't have inner adductor muscles. It has plantar flexors and extensors, and foot invertors/pronators and everters/supinators. Dorsiflexion is controlled by the anterior tibialis on the medial side and the peroneus tertius on the lateral side. You don't want to stimulate the nerve to dorsiflex the foot. You want to stimulate the motor points, which tend to be located near the belly of the muscle. I don't know why things were placed where they are but despite all the shortcomings the design of the body is fairly exceptional and hard to duplicate. Moreover, we may get some electric storms today so I don't want to complain to loudly as I might find myself dodging some lightening bolts.


I wouldn't worry about that. There has been a singular lack of lightening lately in these parts, maybe because I ended up on a few enemies lists. I think it has to do with global warming or climate change or something. My mind could use some lightening, but my body is too light already. That muscle on the outside of the calf of my left leg in particular.

Isn't "lateral side" redundant? I guess I don't know enough Greek or something. :-)

Seriously thank you all, you, Nzer, and grandsons4. I find the mention of collagen rings a few bells, and makes me very happy this particular thread is still here, because it points at a possible mechanism for the "tortuosity" that has been mentioned in respect of some veins of interest. I was badly confused about dorsiflection because that's what I thought that calf muscle that I had lost most of was controlling in my foot, leading to its dropped-ness. And I thought the walking electronic stimulator was causing dorsiflection by stimulating the nerves near the surface towards the upper outside of my left calf, and because somebody told me that that was why my foot wouldn't go up. I guess inversion and eversion were more likely, because it actually does help lift up my foot, but as you say, it's hard to outguess Darwin.

Anyway I guess I would need to have an implant for the current to strike closer to those motor points. Is that right?

As for adduction that is a term I thought applied because of what somebody told me about an exercise machine I was using, and I thought I was using my calf muscles.

I am prone to jumping to such contusions. :-)
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2931
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Sep 02, 2013 9:06 am

In addition to lateral and medial sides, don't most people have backsides. It follows then that they must also have front sides, not too mention insides, outsides, upsides and downsides.

You are correct, not confused. Foot drop is caused by weakness of the muscles for dorsiflexion. The peroneus tertius (brevis) on the lateral aspect of the fibula works with the anterior tibialis located between the tibia and fibula to dorsiflex the foot. The tibialis and peroneal muscles also supinate and pronate (invert/evert) the foot. You would definitely want to implant an electorde close to the motor points of the target muscle. If you stimulate motor lines or nerves you will get unwanted contractions of other muscles that are on the same circuit.

I must say you did jump to "contusions' about adductors after using the exercise machine. Calf muscles and knee joints aren't designed for it and they can't adduct the legs. The only way to get the hinge joints of the knees to adduct would be to break them. The ball and socket joints of the hips are much better suited for adduction of the legs by the inner thigh muscles.
User avatar
uprightdoc
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1710
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: USA

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Sep 02, 2013 9:41 am

Dania,
I am posting this here because you said I could and it is nothing personal you haven't already posted on this thread.

I spent a great deal of time morning trying to piece together information on your case and turned up very little. You have very complicated case with a history of significant trauma and a diagnosis of what I surmise is most likely possible or probable MS but you have no medical reports, no MRIs, no x-rays and no lab tests. The only objective evidence I have so far is second hand information from you regarding a communication with your neurologist in which he referred to an MRI done in 2007 that showed a lesion in your cervical cord. Nothing more was mentioned. I guess this means there were no lesions in the brain. He also mentioned that the MRI may no longer be available. In other words, you have no images. I did get to see your upright MRI and cine CSF flow studies done for Dr. Rosa's study. I do recall seeing significant upper cervical misalignment with malrotation and blockage of CSF flow as well as excess cervical lordosis. You may also have excess thoracic kyphosis from my observation. The images are part of a study, however, and not available. I haven't seen them since. You reported that you have fallen and been bucked by horses many times. On one occasion a horse tripped and partially fell on you. You said that you broke ribs, an elbow and metatarsal bones on three separate occasions. You also recall a fall not related to riding in which you landed hard on your buttocks. You have recent pelvic x-rays. I haven't seen them yet but from what I gather so far, nothing abnormal was noted by the radiologist. Among other things you say that you are nearly quadriplegic. You say you can stand but you can't walk. You still live at home but are in a WC and need help with most things. You say your strength improves significantly when you alter positions. Lastly, you describe significant muscle spasms in your legs, pelvis, spine, shoulders and neck that you say is pulling you up into a ball-like position. You previously reported some relief initially from AO correction and flexion-distraction and scans following AO correction showed improved blood and CSF flow. But the benefits were minimal, if at all, and they don’t last. You also report that you get significant relief and improved strength by altering positions in your WC.

Your problems are most likely coming from higher up in the spine and cord. Misalignments of the pelvis don't cause the weaknesses in the arms and legs that you describe. On the other hand, pelvic misalignments can cause severe muscle spasms and twist you up like Quasimodo. Deformation of the spine can further affect neurovascular tunnels in the craniocervical, thoracic and pelvic coutlets that can compress blood vessels and nerves. Chronic pelvic misalignments and muscle spasms can also compound the underlying structural and neurological problems and hasten neuro and musculoskeletal degenerative processes. While you can't get rid of the damage to the spine, relieving the spasms in the spine and pelvis may help restore some of your strength, function and independence. It’s almost impossible not to get knotted up sitting in a WC. I would be working with next to nothing but I am willing to take a look at you and see something can be done to untangle the knots.
User avatar
uprightdoc
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1710
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: USA

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby 1eye » Mon Sep 02, 2013 10:39 am

uprightdoc wrote:...front sides, not too mention insides, outsides, upsides and downsides.
I must have been beside myself. Or somebody.

uprightdoc wrote:The only way to get the hinge joints of the knees to adduct would be to break them.
Ouch. I guess I needed that. That's me all over. I'd better leave all those prefixes to the artful.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2931
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby dania » Mon Sep 02, 2013 10:47 am

uprightdoc wrote:Dania,
I am posting this here because you said I could and it is nothing personal you haven't already posted on this thread.

I spent a great deal of time morning trying to piece together information on your case and turned up very little. You have very complicated case with a history of significant trauma and a diagnosis of what I surmise is most likely possible or probable MS but you have no medical reports, no MRIs, no x-rays and no lab tests. The only objective evidence I have so far is second hand information from you regarding a communication with your neurologist in which he referred to an MRI done in 2007 that showed a lesion in your cervical cord. Nothing more was mentioned. I guess this means there were no lesions in the brain. He also mentioned that the MRI may no longer be available. In other words, you have no images. I did get to see your upright MRI and cine CSF flow studies done for Dr. Rosa's study. I do recall seeing significant upper cervical misalignment with malrotation and blockage of CSF flow as well as excess cervical lordosis. You may also have excess thoracic kyphosis from my observation. The images are part of a study, however, and not available. I haven't seen them since. You reported that you have fallen and been bucked by horses many times. On one occasion a horse tripped and partially fell on you. You said that you broke ribs, an elbow and metatarsal bones on three separate occasions. You also recall a fall not related to riding in which you landed hard on your buttocks. You have recent pelvic x-rays. I haven't seen them yet but from what I gather so far, nothing abnormal was noted by the radiologist. Among other things you say that you are nearly quadriplegic. You say you can stand but you can't walk. You still live at home but are in a WC and need help with most things. You say your strength improves significantly when you alter positions. Lastly, you describe significant muscle spasms in your legs, pelvis, spine, shoulders and neck that you say is pulling you up into a ball-like position. You previously reported some relief initially from AO correction and flexion-distraction and scans following AO correction showed improved blood and CSF flow. But the benefits were minimal, if at all, and they don’t last. You also report that you get significant relief and improved strength by altering positions in your WC.

Your problems are most likely coming from higher up in the spine and cord. Misalignments of the pelvis don't cause the weaknesses in the arms and legs that you describe. On the other hand, pelvic misalignments can cause severe muscle spasms and twist you up like Quasimodo. Deformation of the spine can further affect neurovascular tunnels in the craniocervical, thoracic and pelvic coutlets that can compress blood vessels and nerves. Chronic pelvic misalignments and muscle spasms can also compound the underlying structural and neurological problems and hasten neuro and musculoskeletal degenerative processes. While you can't get rid of the damage to the spine, relieving the spasms in the spine and pelvis may help restore some of your strength, function and independence. It’s almost impossible not to get knotted up sitting in a WC. I would be working with next to nothing but I am willing to take a look at you and see something can be done to untangle the knots.
My neuro said I have no plaques in my brain. I do not have spasms but constantly contracted muscles. They just never relax. And that is why my movements are restricted. As Soon as they relax I can use them. Since discovering placing a wider wedge in between my knees greatly helps me two days ago, I have had it there for the last 48 hours. The contracted muscles have diminished drastically. Sitting straighter, pelvis is realigning to the normal position. Pain from the pelvic area and pinched nerve in the groin is almost gone. Kyphosis in my neck and spine disappearing. I just realized I have some MRI's from my angios and vein bypass surgeries. Not sure if they will help but I will look for them. When you discover what it my root cause of my problem you should write a paper. Every procedure I had, gave me fantastic temporary improvements. But just did not last. I could not believe what the first AO adjustment did for me. The following day I could stand and wash my dishes. Something I had not done in over 2 years. Right now I have a broader range of motion and strength in my arms then I did two days ago. We will figure this out.
User avatar
dania
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1088
Joined: Wed May 12, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: St Lazare Quebec

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby dania » Mon Sep 02, 2013 10:55 am

User avatar
dania
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1088
Joined: Wed May 12, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: St Lazare Quebec

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Sep 02, 2013 11:03 am

The contracted muscles are due to spasms. The source of the irritation needs to located and treated. If you can demonstrate objective changes in strength with changes in position there is clearly a connection to the spasms. Muscle spasms can compress neurovascular tunnels. The soft tissue strains and muscle spasms need to addressed and balance restored. You won't hold spinal corrections of the upper cervical spine and pelvis if the muscle spams aren't addressed. As I mentioned previously, in addition to hand testing, I use electrical muscle stimulation over motor points to test muscles similar to an EMG.

Any images would be helpful.
User avatar
uprightdoc
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1710
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: USA

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby HappyPoet » Fri Sep 06, 2013 8:53 am

1eye wrote:There has been a singular lack of lightening lately in these parts, maybe because I ended up on a few enemies lists.

I refuse to believe you have any enemies (except maybe some bureaucratic government types who love creating mountains of red-tape and making citizens jump through asinine hoops, but since many of us have some of those types of enemies and because of their temporary nature, these enemies don't really count as real enemies).
User avatar
HappyPoet
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1401
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:00 pm

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby HappyPoet » Fri Sep 06, 2013 9:18 am

Hi DrF,

I know it's last minute, but could you see me this Sunday at 3:00 (but as usual, we might be late)?

Long story short, this week I didn't get my MS Hug steroid injections, so I've been increasing my pain control meds--I don't want to keep putting off seeing you for your Acu-Stim treatment which was really helping. Also, I'm now starting to use hash oil (Rick Simpson marijuana oil aka RSO) and will be posting about my experiences in the coming days on blossom's MMJ thread in the General Discussion forum; here's the direct link: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE.
User avatar
HappyPoet
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1401
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:00 pm

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Fri Sep 06, 2013 1:09 pm

Hello Poet,
I will see you on Sunday at 3PM. I decided to paint myself in a grey epoxy with a similar color polyurethane topcoat to match my hair. The topcoat helps the finish last longer so it doesn't wear off when you shower. It also resists all chemicals, cleaners and abrasion. I can attest to it. The manufacturer says it will last for many years. I hope you like it.

I am a long-time big supporter of total legalization of marijuana for both medicinal purposes, as well as for responsible recreational purposes for adults. A great deal of research has been done on the benefits of MC for neurodegenertive diseaes. We now have a class of receptors called cannabinoids as a result of that research. Certain cannabinoids are beneficial to spasms seen in MS and movement disoders seen in PD. Cannabinoids further appear to be neuroprotective and may be useful for stroke patients. I am also for decriminalization of all legal and illegal drugs. The reasons are too numerous to go into here. In addtion to medicinal and recreational use of marijuana, I am also long-time big supporter of the re-legalization of growing industrial hemp, which has no psychoactive chemicals. Smoking hemp would be like smoking rope. Hemp used to be a major crop here. It has huge commercial value for food, clothing, medicine, industry and biomass energy among other things. It can be grown just about anywhere and we have plenty of fallow farm lands to grow it on.
User avatar
uprightdoc
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1710
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: USA

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby 1eye » Fri Sep 06, 2013 2:16 pm

Both kinds of Hemp, and other drugs taken for medicinal reasons, should IMO be legal when required by medical conditions, the other drugs, under medical supervision. While some may feel that a negative personality change results from cannabis use, that is often inextricable from their own attitudes towards marijuana use, and I would like to see the negative effects quantified and compared to placebo. I don't believe they exist. There are places where marijuana is de-facto and also de-jure legal, today. It should be federally as well.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2931
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

PreviousNext

Return to Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI)

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service