CCSVI and CCVBP

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Fri Sep 13, 2013 11:31 pm

uprightdoc wrote:Hello Robert,
In case I didn't previously reply in a PM, the last sagittal (side) cervical view is more of the same but better detail. The triangular tooth-like bone is the dens of C2 or axis. The vertebra below it is C3. The lower vertebra should look more square. Look at the deformity in your end plates (top and bottom of the vertebra). That type of deformation is from compression loads. The compression loads likewise caused the disc to buldge into the epidural space and compress the vertebral veins (VVP) from C3 through C6. Spondylosis changes the dimensions of the spinal canal and alters the hydraulics in the epidural space surrounding the cord. Those hydraulics are affected by posture, movement and respiration. The faulty hydraulics in the epidural space and veins of the spinal canal are transmitted to the spinal cord. That's a basic principle of physics. The impact of those faulty hydraulics in the epidural space on blood and CSF flow in the cord has yet to be determined. Further research needs to be done. My theory is, whatever it is, faulty hydraulics can't be good.


Hi doc,

Thx, do you know what year this mri is from?
2004, this is the mri that led to my MS diagnosis.
7 lesions and a protein in the spine.

So, the deformations were there in 2004...confusing 8O
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Sat Sep 14, 2013 12:41 am

Dont know if posted this one already. Fonar upright neck, july 2013

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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby tzootsi » Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:32 am

Speaking of fonar, iwhat's happening with Dr. Rosa's study?
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sat Sep 14, 2013 9:31 am

Hello Robert,
Where are the seven lesions located?
The deformation of the spine and discs goes back before 2008, The 2013 upright scan done with cervical flexion shows further degeneration and very close proximity to the cord.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Sat Sep 14, 2013 1:45 pm

Dont know were the 7 lesions were in 2004, i know there were more than 30 lesions in 2010' and more than 20 in 2011.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Sep 15, 2013 3:21 am

Hello Tootzie,
I have been busy and haven't been to the study in awhile. I am not sure what is happening at this time. During July and August I collaborated with Drs. Harshfield and Rosa on a last minute project to write a chapter on the craniocervical junction for a radiology book. I haven't heard anything further on the chapter either. I am sure everything is moving forward. The research and book are timely.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Sun Sep 15, 2013 10:43 pm

uprightdoc wrote:Hello Robert,
Where are the seven lesions located?
The deformation of the spine and discs goes back before 2008, The 2013 upright scan done with cervical flexion shows further degeneration and very close proximity to the cord.


Hi doc,

Question; why do you say 'before 2008' and not 'before 2004'?

You said the 2004 and 2013 mri images were quite similar...

Rgds,

Robert
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Sep 16, 2013 3:34 am

I made a mistake. I was referring to the earlier scan you posted. The early scan in 2004 shows the same areas of deformation as the 2013 scan which shows further degeneration.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Mon Sep 16, 2013 4:06 am

uprightdoc wrote:I made a mistake. I was referring to the earlier scan you posted. The early scan in 2004 shows the same areas of deformation as the 2013 scan which shows further degeneration.


Thx doc, that's very important to me. October 30th i've got an appointment with the neurologist, and this is something i want t discuss with him.
I'm also going to supply a chiropractor with my MRI2013 and your opinion. I hope i'm able to interest someone over here....

Rgds,

Robert
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Sep 16, 2013 7:36 am

Your welcome Robert,
I have not found the rest of your MRI images yet. I will look again later today. You need a chiropractor, osteopath, or good physical therapist with the right procedures and the right equipment. There are several effective manual methods of treating spondylosis such as you have. Electrotherapies and traction are worth considering in your case. You need to rehabilitate the cartilage and connective tissues. The doctor should proceed slowly at first as you may have tethering of the dura mater to the spondylosis. The treating physician should also have expertise in testing the muscles and joints of the spine as well as all the standard orthopedic and neurological tests. You need to find and grade your weaknesses and dysfunction as a benchmark to monitor progress or the lack of it.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:12 am

Hello Dania,
Again, as per your permission for education purposes and empowerment for other patients I will post some of my findings so far from the 12 different studies you gave me that included MRI scans of the brain, cervical spine, sacroiliac joints, coccyx and venograms for CCSVI.

In all of your images that show the head and cervical spine, it shows that you have tilt of the head and cervical spine to the left with rotation of the spinous processes to the right. You have retrolisthesis (backward slippage) of C3 on C4 that indicates damage to the cervical ligaments. You have spondylosis and disc degeneration from C4-C7. Your clavicals appear low on the left side. Your left humerus (upper arm) shows possible signs of an old injury, which is the same side you say you fractured your lower arm. In this regard I also found some weakness in the left wrist flexors and extensors, as well as some of the intrinsic muscles of the left hand. The rest of your upper body is strong. You have significant loss of range of motion in left and right rotation and lateral flexion of your cervical spine. You have decreased and dyskinetic ranges of motion in your upper cervical spine and myofascitis. Your left suboccipital muscles were extremely taut. Your lumbar spine similarly shows significant rotation of the spinous processes to the right. This means that the weight bearing portion of the vertebral bodies of the lumbar spine are rotated to the left. The iliac crests of the pelvis appear low on the left. None of the images were adequate for a complete radiographic analysis of the pelvis or the coccyx. The MRI scan that provided a limited view of the lower spine was obscured by extensive bowel gas. The MRI scans of the of the pelvis were limited to the sacroiliac joints. The only useful information they provide is that the joints are open. They are not fused or unstable. Again, a clear view of the coccyx is clouded by extensive bowel gas. You also have what appears to be a hyperintensity signal in the right frontal lobe area.

That's the short list. There are many problems that are coming together and making your condition much worse than it should be. The misalignment and strain in the lumbar spine and pelvis need to be dealt with. The colon problems are no doubt contributing to the myofascial issues and inflammation in the spine as well. Your transfer method is aggravating and further straining your cervicothoracic and lumbopelvic spine. It is also straining your wrists and making your left neck, shoulder, arm and wrist worse. Lastly the stem to stern strains in the spine and consequently the lack of movement and exercise is causing edema in the legs and feet and the accumulaton of anaerobic waste products. Anaerobic waste product such as lactic acid cause muscle spasms that will further perpetuate and aggravate the mechanical strains associated with the misalignements and spondylosis.

It's complicated but I am working on a game plan.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Tue Sep 17, 2013 11:25 am

Hi doc,

Tomorrow i'll receive a reaction from the neurosurgeon on your opinion.
if it's positive, it will be an extra argument in the conversation with the neurologist at oct 30th.
If not, i have to be more 'convincing' :mrgreen:

I hope the neuro will send me to the back&neck clinic in Holland, They are very specialized in problems with the spine.

Next to that; my mri and your info is at a chiropractor specialized in spine.
Next week i hope to get a reaction from this side.

So...the wheels are in motion :-D

Question from my physiotherapist: can you give an example (brand/type) of a traction device (he's curious :lol: )

Rgds,

Robert
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Tue Sep 17, 2013 11:56 am

Go get 'em Robert. Leave the neurosurgeons scratching their heads and pulling their hair out. Blossom caused several to go bald after sparring with her.

The links below are to two examples of excellent tables. I have posted others previously as well. It is important to control angle, strength and duration of pull, as well as the ramp and treatment times. Having control over table top section is also important to accomodate different conditions. I also used a table with whole body traction that could pull from the head and feet at the same time, as well as different types of intersegmental traction.

http://www.coxtechnic.com/doctors/whats-new-in-the-cox-table-8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rA6BwA0vAo

Keep on bugging the experts. Eventually they will catch on.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby dania » Tue Sep 17, 2013 12:46 pm

OMG, the TRITON , I want one. Would this table help me Dr Flanagan?
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Tue Sep 17, 2013 1:29 pm

Dania,
I would pull out every tool on the truck to work on you. The Cox 8 Table and the Triton DTS are both good for you. You need decompression from stem to stern and everything in between. After I would get a case like you under control I would set you up on automatic and leave you on for a good 12-15 minutes or so. It's not just the table, however. It's also how the doctor uses it. I own a hammer but it doesn't make me a carpenter and certainly not a master craftsman or cabinet maker.
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