CCSVI and CCVBP

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Wed Dec 18, 2013 3:55 pm

Robert,
Your cervical nerve roots look normal to me. It looks like you may have some atrophy of the cerebellum, which would explain your problems with balance.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Thu Dec 19, 2013 3:56 am

uprightdoc wrote:Robert,
Your cervical nerve roots look normal to me. It looks like you may have some atrophy of the cerebellum, which would explain your problems with balance.

Thx, atrophy of the cerebellum is a bad thing, isn't it?

Just remembered that the neuro surgeon told me that there was a problem with nerve root at C5; right thumb should be problematic (eehhh....no :mrgreen: )
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Thu Dec 19, 2013 4:47 am

hi doc,

From the report from the neurosurgeon of the guy i knöw:
"MRI of is cervical and lumbar spine with contrast was performed as part of his assesment. There is no evidence of any plaques in the cervical cord, no evidence of any enhancement either. The lumbar spine showed the same L4/5 degenerated and bulging disc whih is now causing narrowing of the foramen and compression of the L5 roots'


He had diagnosis MS..
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Dec 19, 2013 11:00 am

Robert,
Atrophy of any part of the brain is a problem. I suspect that cases like yours are due to altered pressure gradients between the cranial vault and the spinal canal. When pressure in the spinal canal is higher than the cranial vault it limits the drainage of CSF from the cranial vault which causes it to back up in the cisterns. The cisterns surround the brainstem. I suspect that chronic increases in CSF volume compresses the brainstem (cerebellum). You have degeneration of the spinal canal in your neck that is probably affecting drainage of CSF from the cranial vault. The Cox 8 flexion-distation table can be used to help move CSF. The link below is to an article I just published on atrophy of the midbrain.

http://uprightdoctor.wordpress.com/

If there is a clinically relevant problem with the C5 nerve root on the right you should have weakness of your right deltoid (shoulder) muscles.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Dec 19, 2013 11:06 am

Robert,
There isn't enough information from what you mentioned here to determine what your friend has exept that he has degeneration (spondylosis) in his low back causing stenosis (narrowing) of the lateral foramen and compression of the L5 nerve root. He doesn't have lesions in the cervical cord. He must have other signs and symptoms.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Thu Dec 19, 2013 12:26 pm

Hi doc,

He has/had fatigue, balance problems, spasmes in the legs. Mild symptoms, diagnosed with ppms in 2009.

He had ccsvi treatment july 2010, just like me he improved mentally/cognitive.
And his walking improved, spasmes went away.
Few months later he was running in the park again, but his physical status is still a point of concern, he has to keep in shape.

And now this, l5 compression and a surgeon that does not see signs of ms..
Hope this gives some more background, i will ask him to post here
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Dec 19, 2013 2:34 pm

Robert,
Does this mean that the surgeon didn't see any signs of problems with balance? It may be good news that he saw no signs of MS, such as lesions or neurological findings, but symptoms of fatigue, loss of balance and spasms affecting gait are not. There is something wrong. Even though he has no cervical cord lesions, he may have structural problems in his cervical spine.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Thu Dec 19, 2013 2:55 pm

Exactlly, i already invited him. 8)
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby blossom » Sat Dec 21, 2013 6:29 pm

hi dr. flanagan, would like your thoughts on these rehab gadgets. if they are any account getting them and the cost will come into play. -- maybe in the future they'll figure a rewire system for the whole body. :wink:

www.handtutor.com/Watch-Testemonial
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Dec 22, 2013 3:39 am

Hello Blossom,
It's definitely a good piece of equipment for rehabilitation. Electrical current is a valuable clinical tool for many conditions including muscle and joint disorders, pain, inflammation, edema, internal disorders, strokes and cancer. There is much more to learn regarding the type of current to use, the frequency and its strength, as well as method of application, electrode placement, current pathways, dispersment, flux lines, penetration etc. I don't know about rewiring the whole body but I am sure we will be able to do better reboots and repairs, as well as replace or reroute damaged circuits in the near future. Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) and robotic type devices similar to the glove will continue to evolve and help restore lost function.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Mon Dec 23, 2013 9:16 am

Hi everyone Compliments of the Season :)

Dr F I see that Prof Ebers has spoken about the study on MS progression and the measurements of MS by researchers;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqY-_K1fYJY

In my humble mind I think it opens the can of worms again regarding what is MS, what is the definition?

If the EDSS is not the best way to assess progress of MS or more importantly define where a person is at in the MS process, is there any direction or hope of finding a better assessment tool for PwMS.

So many symptoms which appear and disappear over time and no two people the same make this disease a true Snow Flake paradigm.

Do you think there will be a better tool for assessing or gauging MS?

Just a few hours to go here! Hope Santa is prepared for the effects of Global Warming on his business activities!

:)
Nigel
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:35 am

Hello Nigel,
The presentation was fast paced but interesting and enlightening. It was also very dismal and offered no hope. On the other hand, it questions the efficacy of many drugs which do nothing to change the long-term progress or outcome of the condition. It is far better to do nothing than to make someone sick while trying to cure their condition.

As far as the definition of MS is concerned, basically it's a neurodegenerative condition associated with remissions and exacerbations and somewhat characteristic signs and symptoms. The signs and symptoms were previously attributed to demyelination but we know now that they aren't necessarily related. Neurological function degenerates regardless of the state of demyelination. This indicates that there are other degenerative processes at work as well.

We already have many good tools for assessing and gauging MS called orthopedic and neurolgocial tests. Muscles testing is an excellent tool but most doctors don't do muscles tests on a regular basis if at all after the diagnosis is made.

It's raining today. Otherwise there have been no significant signs of global warming here. We just got over well below normal cold weather and there is still plenty of snow. Its supposed to get cold again tomorrow so we should have some left over for Santa to make the rounds in time for Christmas.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby PointsNorth » Mon Dec 23, 2013 12:12 pm

Dr. F et. al.,

At least we have a Neuro that can smell the coffee (Ebers).

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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Mon Dec 23, 2013 1:10 pm

One neuro is better than none and he is speaking to a society of doctors. Maybe the message will get through.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Thu Dec 26, 2013 10:59 am

Well Dec 25th has been and gone, hope everyone enjoyed the day :)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this project was to test the effectiveness of osteopathic treatment in cranial venous sinuses drainage in a subject diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) who has not been surgically intervened through venous angioplasty.
METHODOLOGY: The research was done through the database ‘Pubmed’, ‘BioMed Central’ and ‘The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association’. The study evaluated the degree of fatigue and headache through his daily clinical records evolution before, during and after treatment for 4 months. The patient rated the intensity of fatigue and headache in a subjective way on a scale from zero (no fatigue or headache) to ten (tiredness or maximum to unbearable headache). The treatment consisted of the osteopathic venous cranial drain technique once a week over a period of two months.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Prior to the treatment, in terms of fatigue, the rating ‘4’ was the most common value (40%). After the treatment, the most frequently used rating was ‘3’ by 93.54%. As for headache, the most used rating before the treatment was ‘1’ (56.66%). And after the treatment, 96.77% of times the result was ‘0’.
CONCLUSIONS: The osteopathic venous sinus drainage technique in a patient diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and CCSVI has proven effective in reducing fatigue and headache. The study has some limitations as the evaluation and ratings of the records have been subjective. Moreover, the treatment has been tested only in one single patient; therefore, the study should be extended to a larger population in order to obtain more reliable results.
http://www.osteopathic-research.com/?op ... &Itemid=12

Will be interesting to do a trial with numbers to give meaning to this. Sadly a one off example will not give any indication when osteo or chiro treatments do the same for neck alignment patients without CCSVI as well as PwMS with CCSVI and PwMS in general.

:)
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