CCSVI and CCVBP

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Jan 26, 2014 7:29 am

A soothing massage would be helpful but deep tissue, abdominal and lymphatic massage would be more productive for Dania.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby NZer1 » Sun Jan 26, 2014 12:30 pm

Elsewhere I'm working on another angle to our 'MS' problems but it relates to Dania's situation as much as all PwMS; https://www.facebook.com/notes/nigel-wa ... 5688621514

Rust never sleeps!
27 January 2014 at 08:04
Rust never sleeps!
My thought from an overnight lack of sleep boils down to the model of medicine that Anglo-Americans use to explain things to the nth degree.
We don't need to understand the nuts and bolts when the nuts and bolts are rusted and nearly gone.
The model of medicine that is used in Asiatic regions is based on the fact that no one problem caused ill health and no one fix will regain health.
So for those with MS as one example trying to find the needle in the hay stack is essentially a waste of time.

## When we have ill health we don't have time as the rust never sleeps! ##

A multimodal Darwinian strategy
Abstract
The conflict between our 'primitive' genes and 'modern' lifestyle probably lies at the root of several disorders that afflict modern man. Atherosclerosis, which is relatively unknown among contemporary hunter-gatherer populations, has reached pandemic proportions in recent times. Being an evolutionary problem with several inter-related pathologies, current therapeutic strategy for treating atherosclerosis has inherent limitations. Reviewing evolution-linked risk factors suggests that there are four aspects to the etiology of atherosclerosis namely, decreased intestinal parasitism, oversensitivity of evolutionarily redundant mast cells, chronic underactivation of AMPK (cellular energy sensor) and a deficiency of vitamin D. A combination of these four causes appear to have precipitated the atherosclerosis pandemic in modern times. Man and worms co-existed symbiotically in the past. Massive de-worming campaigns could have disrupted this symbiosis, increasing nutritional availability to man (pro-obesity) at the cost of decreased immunotolerance (pro-atherogenicity). A reduction in helminth-induced chronic TH2 activation could also have enhanced TH1 polarization, eventually disrupting the reciprocal regulation of TH1/TH2 balance and resulting in atherosclerosis. The riddance of helminth infestations may have rendered mast cells immunologically redundant, making them oversensitive to inflammatory stimuli, thereby playing a pro-atherogenic role. AMPK activation exerts pleiotropic anti-atherogenic effects, such as suppression of fatty acid, cholesterol, protein synthesis, reduction of vascular smooth muscle proliferation, etc. As energy deficit is the chief stimulus for AMPK activation, the over-nourished modern man appears to be suffering from chronic underactivation of AMPK, legitimising the unrivalled supremacy of metformin, the oldest prescribed antidiabetic drug. The fact that humans evolved in the sunny tropics suggests that humans are selected for high vitamin D levels. Vitamin D deficiency is now linked to several conditions including increased risk of CV disorders, diabetes, etc. The manifold decrease in vitamin D levels in modern man justifies a need for supplementation. We therefore hypothesize that a judicious combination of mast cell stabilization, AMPK activation, vitamin D supplementation, and moderation in hygiene practices could be an evolution-based multimodal strategy for both preventing and mitigating the pandemic of atherosclerosis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2435 ... t=abstract

:)
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Sun Jan 26, 2014 2:31 pm

This hypothesis ignores the fact that hunter gatherers worked much harder to acquire food and ate much less red meat, fowl and fish, as well as food in general. The meat they did eat was lean game and fowl meat not the well marbleized and fatty meats of docile domestic farm animals fattened with unnatural grains such as corn and soybean, GMOs and antibiotics. They also dry roasted their meats. They didn't cook with overheated denatured burnt oils and they didn't cover meats, fowl and fish with sticky starches and deep fry them.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Tue Feb 04, 2014 4:33 am

Hi Doc,

Tomorrow i have an appointment with the orthopedic surgeon, to discuss my spine.
initially he was very...let's say sceptic :mrgreen:...and not so positive about 'these american doctors'

but he called two weeks ago, very enthousiastic...Hi Robert!!! Llet's look at your spine together, come over here....bladibla :mrgreen:

Well. i suppose he has to tell me something....if he let me visit him and says; cant see anything wrong....he has to explain a few things 8)

He's got my latest MRI from July 2013.

Do you have any 'smart remarks' i can use??

Regards,

Robert
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Tue Feb 04, 2014 10:09 am

Hello Robert,
The epidural space is located between the spinal cord and the bones of the spinal canal. The epidural space contains the vertebral veins. Ask the doctor if the spondylosis in your case is compressing the epidural space and vertebral veins. If it does, then ask the doctor if compression of the vertebral veins can cause venous hypertension. If it can, then ask the doctor if he thinks that venous hypertension decrease perfusion of the cord resulting in chronic ischemia, which is a decrease in arterial blood flow to the cord. Also ask the doctor if he has heard of Dr. Wise Young. Dr. Young is a neurosurgeon is a neurosurgeon who specialize in traumatic cord injuries. He maintains that venous hypertension is one of the most overlooked cause of chronic ischemia and degeneration of the cord. Lastly ask the doctor if he is aware of a condition called venous hypertension myelopathy that causes signs and symptoms similar to compression of the cord. It is my opinion that spondylosis is a one of the most overlooked causes of venous hypertension and subsequent degeneration of the cord. It can also cause signs and symptoms of myelopathy in certain cases.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Tue Feb 04, 2014 10:32 am

Thx doc,

This is exactly what i mean!

Regards,

Robert
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Tue Feb 04, 2014 12:12 pm

Good luck. I have been trying to explain it to doctors for thirty years.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Tue Feb 04, 2014 12:32 pm

The nature article is interesting, printed & in the bag!
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Tue Feb 04, 2014 1:02 pm

Spondylosis and venous hypertension that can cause chronic ischemic degeneration of the cord and possible myelopathy applies to many patients with MS such as Blossom and Dania. MS associated with cord signs tends to be more progressive and cause greater disabilities. Compressive myelopathy needs to be addressed early before damage to the cord becomes permanent. Endoscopic surgery is very effective, minimally invasive and cost effective but surgeons don't see the connection yet.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Thu Feb 06, 2014 4:45 am

Hi Doc,

The appointment was ok, but you should not ask such difficult questions :lol:

AKA, the docs dont think outside the box....

But, he said my lumbar part looked ok. normal athrophy .
In the cervical part he saw a weird thing; remember the bulb at C4-c5?? It looked like a....5-6cm long 1cm wide 'thing' now...My images are too dark, cant see it clearly.
(between vertical MRI and horizontal MRI was about a month time)

He is going to discuss it with the radiologist....is it an artifact???

He also said that the symptoms I have can be caused by the cervical problems, but veins, hypertension....theories....not proven.....etc etc...
i'm going to try to get a cine mri...i want to see the CSF pulse........going to be very difficult here in Holland...
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Feb 06, 2014 8:03 am

Hi Robert,
Your doctor needs to lose the wooden shoes, put on some Nikes and get up to speed with the research. Venous hypertension myelopathy is a rare but well recognized disorder typically caused by arterial venous malformations (AVM) in which high pressure arterial blood bypasses the capillary beds and gets shunted directly into the veins which causes edema and ischemia due to decreased perfusion pressure gradients. Venous hypertension is also a recognized case of ischemia in traumatic spinal cord injuries. Lastly, recent studies suggest that obstruction to venous flow may play a role in hydrocephalus. What is unknown is the role of spondylosis in causing chronic venous hypertension due to compression of the vertebral veins and subsequent ischemia resulting in neurodegenerative processes in the cord and possibly myelopathy. I further suspect that spondylosis may also play a role in decreases venous flow and subsequent neurodegenerative processes in the brain.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Thu Feb 06, 2014 12:36 pm

You're so right...

But....which doctor knows it all? About csf, vein flow, spine and looks over the fence?

In Holland there was/is a discussion about making wrong diagnosis....few neurologists were punished.
Another well known Neurologist (but not on a high level in the monkey tree) said that a wrong diagnosis is not uncommon.

Result? He's punished, not allowed to work anymore...

Put on Nikes? Forget it....
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby uprightdoc » Thu Feb 06, 2014 1:50 pm

There are neurosurgeons and radiologists who are understand the connection between the veins and CSF flow. They also understand the connection between malformations of the craniocervical junction and blood and CSF flow. Radiologisst however, don't treat patients and neurosurgeons only know surgical approaches. Very few understand the impact of misalignments, spondylosis, scoliosis and stenosis on blood and CSF flow. They are just beginning to appreciate the role of the vertebral veins in upright posture and craniospinal hydrodynamics. Upright MRI will shed more light.
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Postby Robnl » Thu Feb 06, 2014 2:48 pm

These neurosurgeons and radiologists should speak up, but first (i think) the knowledge of veins and their function should get higher.

Dr siddiqui of UB said it; 'we know almost anything about arteries but almost nothing about veins'

We'll get there, but we could get there faster if doctors would work togetherand listen to eachother...
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