Got my blood flow quantification analysis, now what?

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Got my blood flow quantification analysis, now what?

Postby Jugular » Fri Oct 01, 2010 8:58 pm

So I received my blood flow analysis from Dr. Haacke c/o False Creek and, as expected, it showed severe narrowing of my right IJV. This is pretty easy to understand and see. Less obvious is the data from the blood flow analysis.

While the left-sided blood flow leads in all categories, they are pretty close between the various veins- except the right IJV, which is markedly behind the left IJV. Reflux was detected. The flow rates showed that the left side was draining more than the right.

Does anyone have any theories about the implications of one side of the neck vessels carrying more of the blood flow than the other?

Also there was a V/A mismatch (which I assume means veins over arteries) of -7.68% in the lower neck and 11.37% in the upper neck. What does this mean?

All views welcome. I'd like to understand as much as I can before taking the next step of seeking treatment.
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blood flow report

Postby solney » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:14 pm

can i ask how long after your visit to false creek , did your blood flow report come. we are waiting for ours still after almost a month
thanks
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Re: blood flow report

Postby Jugular » Sat Oct 02, 2010 8:33 am

solney wrote:can i ask how long after your visit to false creek , did your blood flow report come. we are waiting for ours still after almost a month
thanks
Mine came in 25 days. Unlike the the Doppler and MRV reports, they sent it by snail mail. If it's been a month you should call False Creek to see if they sent it out to you yet. I think you'll be impressed with the report because it is pretty comprehensive and explains what these images mean.

No one care to comment on asynchronous blood flow either left vs. right or veins vs. artery?
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Postby Billmeik » Sat Oct 02, 2010 10:34 am

I wonder if old fals creek patients can get a Haake analysis. I did imaging there in Feb.


I hear that good flow is 500. Ms patients usually have 120. Sounds like you have that on one side.
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Postby 1eye » Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:30 pm

vein transit == V
artery transit == A

Success means that both parts of the system successfully circulate, either completely

- every hemoglobule gets circulated all the way from heart, lung complex (HL), around to HL again

or on time

- every hemoglobule circulates fast enough for all chemical or biological processes to succeed, before the next time it gets to HL

Call promptness P, completeness, C. Each of these can be yes/no. But to be honest, C is always true or we would be losing blood somewhere.

So we have V, A, and P.

P defines transit's success: if P is ever no, the blood transition fails. P == success, for a vein, or an artery transit

P must be yes, or the transition was not successful. One of A or V is always true. If we leave out cases where no flow occurs, we have:

VAP
------
r) 010 Artery slow
s) 011 Artery works ok.

u) 100 Vein slow
v) 101 Vein works ok.

x) 110 Both slow
y) 111 Both work ok.

Cases of vein/artery asynchrony seem to be r or u. X is not v/a asynchrony. Case of jugular asynchrony can be u or x (we are not talking about arteries here).

So r and u are v/a asynchrony problems. Vein slower than artery, and artery slower than vein.

Blood cells can go through from HL back to HL, but slow down in the vein and speed up again in the artery. They can slow down in the artery and speed up again in the vein, but r is less likely. Two kinds of problems then occur:

1) hypoxia because the arterial blood is also too slow, and the venous slowdown has affected it (case x).
2) iron deposition because venous blood hangs around too long (either case x or u.).

Case 1 is part of x (both too slow), above. Case 2 is part of x or u. R and u are v/a asynchrony. Jugular asynchrony can happen in either x (hypoxia more likely) or u.

Does case1 happen more often in supine position?

Any of this make sense?
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
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Postby Jugular » Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:12 pm

1eye wrote:Does case1 happen more often in supine position?

Any of this make sense?
To be honest, not on the first read. :-). Since the MRV was done while I was supine, the blood flow quantification might look completely different when upright. Oddly, in my case, while my lower right IJV is severely stenosed, the right vertebral veins are much more developed than left. Adaptation?

In any case, here is the entire table. Anything you can see with your sharp one
eye?

Thanks!
Image
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