long-term complications

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

long-term complications

Postby heres » Tue Oct 05, 2010 2:43 am

Hi, I would like to know if there could be long-term effects/complications after treatment. Our body has lived with malformations since its birth, so, if we open our veins, there could be a sort of adaptation to the new status. Any information of what could happen in two, five or ten years to our circulatory system? Thanks!
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Postby 1eye » Tue Oct 05, 2010 4:34 am

Not as bad as the long-term consequences of doing nothing, I'm sure of that. And they don't have to be long-term, either.
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Postby heres » Tue Oct 05, 2010 4:45 am

Sure. But what kind of complications may occur?
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Postby Algis » Tue Oct 05, 2010 4:50 am

How would we know... The oldest one around here is about 1 year....

And after 10 years in a wheelchair; you might have other thoughts about "long term"
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Postby LivabirdsHubbie » Tue Oct 05, 2010 5:10 am

maybe if the governments all smartened up and allow the treatment, we can then see over time
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Postby Coolcatcarrie » Tue Oct 05, 2010 5:39 am

I dont see any reason for there to be negative effects for having ur veins opened how they should be!!! The thought hasnt even crossed my mind!
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Postby codefellow » Tue Oct 05, 2010 5:52 am

You should read the stickies.....Post if Liberation did not work for you and known complications/risks of Angioplasty/Stenting. That has about as much as we know this early.
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Postby Cece » Tue Oct 05, 2010 6:01 am

If you consider Dr. Hubbard's fMRI BOLD oxygenation studies, what's being done is the brain is being given what every normal person's brain already gets. And the normal people seem to be doing fine with all that oxygen, not to mention the glucose and the ability to carry waste products away through the blood stream and the stronger blood-brain-barrier that's not being weakened by reflux.
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Postby oreo » Tue Oct 05, 2010 7:36 am

heres, anything new carries the risk of complications down the road. The trick is to minimize the risk by identifying and compensating for the most predictable ones.

In the case of plasty or stents, the most predictible long term problems could well be the consequenses of using procedures designed primarily to treat ateries on veins. The two have very different structures and very different resitance to internal force.

We will need to carefully follow people who have had their veins played with for a very long time to fully answer your question.
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Postby ozarkcanoer » Tue Oct 05, 2010 9:21 am

oreo, good answer. One possible long term problem might be stent life for those of us with stents. I'm counting on all the research over the next several years to maybe answer this question. Meanwhile I am glad to get back much of my QOL.

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Postby Jugular » Tue Oct 05, 2010 10:14 am

Ironically, one of the potential complications of catheter insertion in the IJV's is IJV thrombosis:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/461577-overview
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Postby Cece » Tue Oct 05, 2010 10:27 am

Jugular wrote:Ironically, one of the potential complications of catheter insertion in the IJV's is IJV thrombosis:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/461577-overview

I don't think is referring to one-time catheters that are inserted from the groin area, as in CCSVI venoplasty. I think it's the central venous catheters, such as in dialysis treatment, that are inserted in directly and left in for months or longer.
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Postby Jugular » Tue Oct 05, 2010 11:09 am

Cece wrote:
Jugular wrote:Ironically, one of the potential complications of catheter insertion in the IJV's is IJV thrombosis:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/461577-overview

I don't think is referring to one-time catheters that are inserted from the groin area, as in CCSVI venoplasty. I think it's the central venous catheters, such as in dialysis treatment, that are inserted in directly and left in for months or longer.
Then one can say that there is a small risk of thrombosis. I think the IR's performing the procedure would be well-versed in the risks associated with it anyway especially since they have to elicit informed consent. If they are not mentioning it, the risk must be small and the consequences less severe. Since venous angioplasty seems to be a new thing, though, I wonder if the prospects of thrombosis would increase with catheter plus angioplasty? It's hard to say since there are no long term studies of CCSVI angioplasty treatments.
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Postby Cece » Tue Oct 05, 2010 3:27 pm

Jugular, it's because of the risk of thrombosis (clotting) that people are put on anticlotting anticoagulants. It is indeed a risk of this procedure. I do not think it's a risk of simply inserting the catheter but definitely of the ballooning itself, since that damages the vein walls.
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Postby 1eye » Tue Oct 05, 2010 6:28 pm

Cece wrote:Jugular, it's because of the risk of thrombosis (clotting) that people are put on anticlotting anticoagulants. It is indeed a risk of this procedure. I do not think it's a risk of simply inserting the catheter but definitely of the ballooning itself, since that damages the vein walls.


I got put on the anticoags for my arterial stents. Does that mean thrombosis is a risk there too?
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