I think I found it: This Is MS

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Postby zap » Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:15 pm

very interesting ... I've been thinking (much less rigorously) along the same lines lately ... see http://www.thisisms.com/ftopic-15116-0- ... c-zap.html

Keep it up, interesting avenue of inquiry that dovetails nicely with the CCSVI theory.
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Postby Leonard » Thu Jan 13, 2011 3:15 am

In the beginning of the 1980s, apparently there has been a discussion in the medical community of the connection of multiple sclerosis and diabetes. The discussion was inconclusive and eventually must have disappeared in the background.

I suppose that at that time, the vein insufficiency in the neck and the related low glucose condition of the brain were not part of the debate. But now with ccsvi, all this makes sense, and all the pieces of the puzzle seem to come together. The low oxygen O2 also fits in quite nicely. http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-15235.html

With the (hypo)thesis of this thread, I think we have come very close to unravel the MS mystery.
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glucose

Postby zinamaria » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:43 am

Great thread Leo, since (and I stated this on zap's thread) I have been dealing with a sugar addiction most of my life (that is dramatically changed) and my mother also had adult onset diabetes and I feel that with the changes I made I potentially prevented this happening to me.

I came to grips with my sugar addiction when I went on the Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, a no sugar diet, fighting Candida. Then I found Ann Boroch's book, Healing MS, who also believe Candida is at the root of MS and she actually has MS (I know Lora knows this book for it has come up on other threads). The Body Ecology diet is not easy, but it is, I think, more effective, if you want to stop the sugar addiction in its tracks, than Ann's book, although her book has really valuable information for those of us with MS in terms of nutrition etc. She is a naturopath.
I highly recommend these two books for anyone seeking to improve their diets etc without sugar and their overall health.

And I am with Lora on this, my health has radically improved and I feel much better, have more vital energy, than when I was on sugar. (Now I do allow for natural sugars, like fruit, minimally, but am careful when I feel the cravings kicking in again, which happens, so I back off. It's not easy, but neither is having MS).

Just wanted to mention these books for those seeking some support and information on the sugar thing.
Also want to mention, for those interested, Dr Mercola, online, has very valuable information as regards glucose, especially grains as sugar.
Hope this is helpful.

zina
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Postby Leonard » Mon Jan 17, 2011 3:20 am

I believe that this discussion should not concentrate exclusively on the vascular dimension. The reason why we have taken this discussion so far is that we have been able and willing to look outside the box, that is the box of the neurologists. Now we should not make the systemic failure of locking ourselves into the vascular box. Our primary goal must be to solve the mystery of MS, to find what causes MS and how to best treat it.

Therefore, we must keep our eyes open and continue to look broader, for instance into the low-glucose hypothesis. In fact, MS is a complex disease that to solve it, besides neurologist and vascular doctors, may need to involve other disciplines such as diabetics specialists.

In the beginning of the 1980's there has been a discussion about the links between MS and diabetes. But it was difficult to prove and the issue disappeared in the background. Now with this new ccsvi condition, perhaps the old discussion of the 1980s should be held again, in the right context and against this new background. For further information about the low glucose condition, see: http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-15181.html

I think the medical world can not get around this low-glucose hypothesis. The explanation given for the double peak in the age of onset makes this highly plausible as a concept. For the rest of the posting, if you do google and bing searches, you will find many recent articles that can confirm every single sentence of the (hypo)thesis.

Therefore, I call on the medical world to investigate the low-glucose hypothesis as part of their efforts. They can deny, deter, defer, delay and try to destroy. But at the end of the day, that will not work because the evidences are there and the pieces of the puzzle just connect too neatly.
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Postby lyndacarol » Mon Jan 17, 2011 11:22 am

Leonard – Please give me explanations for these two situations:

#1 Why is the glucose level lower in MS patients; that is, what lowers the glucose level?

Other than a diet low in glucose-making foods, the only answer I can suggest is a high level of insulin that sweeps the glucose out of the bloodstream.

#2 Several years ago there was successful treatment of children with seizures at Johns Hopkins. The treatment was a ketogenic diet (diet high in fats and protein) and did control the seizures. As I recall, the finding was that the brain could function just fine on ketones – that glucose was not necessary for brain function.

In the 1920s anthropologist-turned-Arctic-explorer, Vilhjalmur Stefansson, spent a decade among the Inuit, eating nothing but meat, no vegetables or fruit. His observation was that those who lived on this diet were among the healthiest imaginable. His observations contradicted conventional wisdom at that time that a varied diet was essential for good health. "It is a misconception that the brain and central nervous system require dietary glucose to function." See pages 319-325 of Good Calories Bad Calories by Gary Taubes.


I completely agree with you when you said:
I believe that this discussion should not concentrate exclusively on the vascular dimension. The reason why we have taken this discussion so far is that we have been able and willing to look outside the box, that is the box of the neurologists. Now we should not make the systemic failure of locking ourselves into the vascular box. Our primary goal must be to solve the mystery of MS, to find what causes MS and how to best treat it.

I propose we start in the box of endocrinologists.
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