WBV (whole body vibration)

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

WBV (whole body vibration)

Postby nellie » Thu Jan 13, 2011 8:01 am

My physical therapy center has purchased a whole body vibrator machine & wants me to try it. Has anyone utilized one & has it helped? I'm wondering if it has any negative effect on my ccsvi treatment I had 2 months ago. Any thoughts or experience with one? Thanks.
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Postby AlmostClever » Thu Jan 13, 2011 8:17 am

My chiro had some vibrating plates that you stand on. Those who couldn't stand could put a chair on the plate and just sit.

Is this what you're talking about?

I don't go anymore since it is hard for me but it seemed to help a little - didn't hurt!

Don't know if this is an issue with stents - probably not once they are secure in place.

edit - Have not done vibration therapy since starting my procedures so I don't know what effect this would have on angio'd veins.
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Al Einstein
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Postby nellie » Thu Jan 13, 2011 8:27 am

Thanks. This is a stand up machine with arm supports. Looks to be very nice. I don't have stents but was concerned with jeopardizing my angio treatment. I don't think it will as it increases blood flow & exercises muscles withiut the fatigue they say.
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Postby L » Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:39 am

I'm in the same position as you Nellie. I am giving it a couple of months because, like you, I'm unsure. I'm pretty certain it would be fine anyway, like you say, it stimulates blood flow.
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Postby Cece » Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:47 am

http://www.thisisms.com/ftopicp-105973.html#105973

drsclafani wrote:
AlmostClever wrote:I also stand on a vibration plate for rehab. Might this also increase the risks mentioned?


not sure, but i would not recommend it to someone who used it for a couple of weeks simply because i do not know whether the effects of vibration might enhance movement. Just to play it safe


This was specifically in response to someone with a stent, which is why he referred to movement of the stent.
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Postby AlmostClever » Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:54 am

OMG! I forgot I asked that! Thx CeCe!
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Al Einstein
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Postby nellie » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:37 am

Thanks Cece & AlmostClever. I think I'll wait on this one.
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Postby Cece » Sat Jan 15, 2011 2:14 pm

AlmostClever wrote:OMG! I forgot I asked that! Thx CeCe!

I wasn't trying to be cute about it, I didn't realize you'd posted in this thread and that was you asking the question originally. :)

I don't think using a vibrator plate would be a problem, assuming one is more than a few weeks post-procedure and/or never got stents.
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Postby Cece » Tue Jan 25, 2011 5:46 pm

This was asked about again in Dr. Sclafani's thread just now. Here's what turns up in google scholar:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... x/abstract

the Cardiovascular Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Part I. Longitudinal Effects: Hydrodynamic Analysis
Z. Yue, J. MesterArticle first published online: 21 JUN 2007

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9590.2007.00379.x
Issue

For a given direction of whole-body vibration and a given piece of blood vessel, the local vibration has in general both a longitudinal (parallel) component and a lateral (perpendicular) component. The longitudinal and lateral effects are treated in Part I and Part II, respectively. In Part I, detailed hydrodynamic analysis shows that the maximal shear stress at the wall of the vessel is considerably increased by the longitudinal component of vibration for big vessels. For example, for high frequency range 40–50 Hz, the maximal shear stress at the wall of coronary artery could increase by 35–49% even if the local longitudinal amplitude is as small as 50 μm. Potential benefits and risks associated with this effect are discussed. In Part II, statistical analysis is carried out based on the results of specially designed experiments, where accelerations at different body locations and some cardiovascular parameters were measured simultaneously. Some changes of body mode were arranged during the vibration experiments in a way that the transmissibility of vibration increased considerably during each change of body mode. Statistical analysis of the results suggests with high level of confidence (>97%) that arterioles were dilated during such changes of body mode. Potential benefits associated with this effect are discussed.


anyone get any meaning out of that?
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