ISNVD Abstracts are all online now--

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Postby MrSuccess » Sat Mar 19, 2011 10:56 pm

zinmaria - it's getting harder and harder to keep up on all the developments that CCSVI has to offer . What a nice problem to have !

One thing that is good to remember ..... is Dr. Scalfani's statement that he made .... on his thread ...... which was ...... when he asked his colleagues if they knew how blood returned from the head to the heart ... most if not all .... could not correctly say how it was done .

So what chance of understanding ..... do the rest of us have ?

Regardless ......... everyone needs to keep asking each other questions in hope that an eventual understanding of CCSVI and how it connects to MS becomes clearly understood by everyone ...... not just doctors . :idea:


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Re: ISNVD Meeting

Postby NHE » Sun Mar 20, 2011 2:42 am

Are there any recordings of the talks available?

Thanks, NHE
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Postby Jugular » Sun Mar 20, 2011 7:25 am

To me, by far, the most compelling study presented at the conference was Dr. Hubbard's. He demonstrated, using a functional MRI, that MS patients had significantly impaired cognitive function vs. healthy controls. Astoundingly, function was normalized after venous angioplasty.

http://ccsvism.xoom.it/ISNVD/Abstract-Hubbard.pdf
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Postby pklittle » Sun Mar 20, 2011 8:07 am

Click.. save as... click.. save as.....

I am going to import these pdf's into my ibooks and read them on my ipad.. I hope they are not TOO over-my-head and that I can gleen something from them.

8O
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Postby Cece » Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:32 am

Jugular wrote:To me, by far, the most compelling study presented at the conference was Dr. Hubbard's. He demonstrated, using a functional MRI, that MS patients had significantly impaired cognitive function vs. healthy controls. Astoundingly, function was normalized after venous angioplasty.

http://ccsvism.xoom.it/ISNVD/Abstract-Hubbard.pdf

I love his work too. It's objective measurement of immediate improvements post-procedure. It ties in the venoplasty of the jugular valves down by the base of the neck with the performance of the brain. It may be the biggest news coming out of ISNVD and that is saying something, because ISNVD was a feast.

One thing to note with Dr. Hubbard's work is that he did not show an improvement in task activation networks. The part of the brain focusing on the cognitive task was exactly the same pre- and post-venoplasty and this was 30%-70% less than what a healthy subject brought to bear on the task-activated part of the brain. It was the part of the brain that was NOT focusing on the task that went from being at the level of a MS patient pre-venoplasty to being at the level of a healthy subject post-procedure.
The finding of significant differences between normal controls and MS patients in BOLD response patterns associated with a cognitive task in both task-positive and task-negative cortical networks sheds light on neuronal mechanisms of cognitive impairment in MS patients. Most remarkably, the inhibition of the default network appears to be impaired in posterior parietal and anterior medial prefrontal cortex and this impairment is reversed and in fact normalized by venoplasty. Since BOLD response is a function of cerebral blood flow and volume, and also oxygen metabolism rate, the reduced BOLD responses in both task positive and task-negative networks may reflect not only altered neuronal function but also change in cortical venous blood volume in MS. Thus the recovery of the suppression in the default network by angioplastic treatment may reflect recovered neuronal and/ or vascular function. Moreover the increase in the venous undershoot component of the BOLD response in MS as compared to controls and its reduction after venoplasty provides evidence of impaired clearance and CNS venous insufficiency and holds out the promise that this method may provide an objective diagnostic test.

There's the full conclusion. The improvements were in the task-negative default network as well as the BOLD undershoot. It's amazing.

See what can be done when neurologists cooperate with IRs!
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Postby Jugular » Sun Mar 20, 2011 12:39 pm

Cece wrote:
Jugular wrote:To me, by far, the most compelling study presented at the conference was Dr. Hubbard's. He demonstrated, using a functional MRI, that MS patients had significantly impaired cognitive function vs. healthy controls. Astoundingly, function was normalized after venous angioplasty.

http://ccsvism.xoom.it/ISNVD/Abstract-Hubbard.pdf

I love his work too. It's objective measurement of immediate improvements post-procedure. It ties in the venoplasty of the jugular valves down by the base of the neck with the performance of the brain. It may be the biggest news coming out of ISNVD and that is saying something, because ISNVD was a feast.

One thing to note with Dr. Hubbard's work is that he did not show an improvement in task activation networks. The part of the brain focusing on the cognitive task was exactly the same pre- and post-venoplasty and this was 30%-70% less than what a healthy subject brought to bear on the task-activated part of the brain. It was the part of the brain that was NOT focusing on the task that went from being at the level of a MS patient pre-venoplasty to being at the level of a healthy subject post-procedure.
The finding of significant differences between normal controls and MS patients in BOLD response patterns associated with a cognitive task in both task-positive and task-negative cortical networks sheds light on neuronal mechanisms of cognitive impairment in MS patients. Most remarkably, the inhibition of the default network appears to be impaired in posterior parietal and anterior medial prefrontal cortex and this impairment is reversed and in fact normalized by venoplasty. Since BOLD response is a function of cerebral blood flow and volume, and also oxygen metabolism rate, the reduced BOLD responses in both task positive and task-negative networks may reflect not only altered neuronal function but also change in cortical venous blood volume in MS. Thus the recovery of the suppression in the default network by angioplastic treatment may reflect recovered neuronal and/ or vascular function. Moreover the increase in the venous undershoot component of the BOLD response in MS as compared to controls and its reduction after venoplasty provides evidence of impaired clearance and CNS venous insufficiency and holds out the promise that this method may provide an objective diagnostic test.

There's the full conclusion. The improvements were in the task-negative default network as well as the BOLD undershoot. It's amazing.

See what can be done when neurologists cooperate with IRs!
Thanks for pointing that out Cece. I guess the part of my brain tasked with identifying that distinction hasn't normalized yet. :wink:
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Postby Cece » Sun Mar 20, 2011 6:03 pm

Jugular wrote:Thanks for pointing that out Cece. I guess the part of my brain tasked with identifying that distinction hasn't normalized yet. :wink:

That is funny. ;)

I wish it had showed us entirely the equal of healthy subjects, now that we're post-venoplasty. It rings true with my personal experience; I definitely am better but I still have MS.

I'm curious what happens if they repeat the MRV task function at six months out. Perhaps that gives time for the brain to heal and we see some improvement in the task activation areas too? Is it greedy to want everything?
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Postby coach » Mon Mar 21, 2011 12:47 pm

Keeping up with all this is a full time job. My husband is going to fire me (lol). Thanks for posting Cheer.
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Postby PCakes » Mon Mar 21, 2011 1:23 pm

Cece wrote: Is it greedy to want everything?


Not at all!! Tell me?..who doesn't wish for good health??

Multi-tasking needs healthy cognition. I'd think one without the other might lead to random acts.
Cognition roused and time should have you cooking with gas on ALL burners soon enough. :)

(..and a wave of shudders passes over the scientific crowd ;) )
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papers

Postby zinamaria » Mon Mar 21, 2011 7:05 pm

mrsuccess said:

"zinmaria - it's getting harder and harder to keep up on all the developments that CCSVI has to offer . What a nice problem to have !"

Agreed!!

I agree with the greed for health too!
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Postby frodo » Thu Mar 24, 2011 4:52 pm

Cece wrote:Here is Dr. Hubbard's fMRI research!

http://ccsvism.xoom.it/ISNVD/Abstract-Hubbard.pdf

I am very happy to see measureable differences pre- and post-venoplasty. Not sure why the default network improved and the task-positive network did not?


Maybe this does not help to stablish a correlation between CCSVI and MS, but now we have two studies that show that CCSVI is a problem "per se" and that correcting it is good for the patient.

The other: Is chronic fatigue the symptom of venous insufficiency associated with multiple sclerosis?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20351673
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