Sweat Response

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Sweat Response

Postby Lyon » Mon Apr 04, 2011 12:05 pm

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Last edited by Lyon on Fri Jun 24, 2011 6:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Cece » Mon Apr 04, 2011 12:18 pm

The relationship between the metabolic, thermal load of exercise, sudomotor (sweat) response, and core temperature was examined in 20 individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and eight non-MS control subjects. Participants performed an incremental bicycle test of maximal aerobic power (VO2peak) from which 50% of VO2peak was calculated. A 50% VO2peak endurance test was performed while subject wore a full-body water garment. Initial circulating water temperature of 27°C was increased 2°C every three minutes to enhance the thermal load. Core, skin, and circulating water temperatures were monitored. Onset of sweating was measured at five sites. Results showed that 50% of the subjects with MS had an abnormally low sweat response in spite of relatively high skin temperatures (> 35°C) at several sites. The thermal load (kJ/kg) of these subjects at test termination was 89% higher than that of the MS subjects with a normal sweat response.

Validation for the claims of lack of sweating!
Based upon the percentages from the present study, we might anticipate that 50% of any given sample of subjects might have a problem with normal sweating. Furthermore, if individuals with MS indicate that they do not sweat, there is a 70% likelihood that they are correct in their observation.
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Postby IHateMS » Mon Apr 04, 2011 12:33 pm

......how i long to sweat again...... :(
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Postby Bethr » Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:19 pm

Sweating was one of the things that immediately changed for me when I started phlebotomy. Previously I stayed out of the sun as it made me feel tired and lethargic and I always seemed to be wrapped up warm and covered even in summer. I didn't really sweat back then.

After that first phleb. when i got that rush of energy I seemed fine out in the sun, felt good even, and stripped down when working and sweated profusely whilst working hard on the garden etc. I've started to wear shorts again too. Don't feel the cold so much.

(for those who don't know me, I was CIS with a mild iron overload 2008-2010) Now treated for the iron overload and all pretty hunky dory!
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Postby 1eye » Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:44 pm

Results showed that 50% of the subjects with MS had an abnormally low sweat response in spite of relatively high skin temperatures (> 35°C) at several sites. The thermal load (kJ/kg) of these subjects at test termination was 89% higher than that of the MS subjects with a normal sweat response.


The abnormally high thermal load: could that be related to heat intolerance? In the shower, I am OK, as long as the water is cool enough. Past a very narrow temperature point, I shut down. Could the lack of sweat be causing some fatigue, dizziness, loss of control, due to inadequate cooling?
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Postby Filmmaker » Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:48 pm

I wonder if there is a difference in this lack of sweating between RRMS and SPMS... It's only when I became SPMS that I noticed this problem... But sometimes I have drenching nightsweats though... weird...
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Postby blossom » Mon Apr 04, 2011 9:52 pm

i sweat early on when i started my symptoms. but, i have not sweat for years. it's a double whammy i feel since some of us no longer sweat because it is one of natures ways of getting toxins out of our bodies. yes, i'd love to sweat again instead of sweating the uncertainty and decline in symptoms.
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Postby Cece » Mon Apr 04, 2011 9:56 pm

1eye wrote:
Results showed that 50% of the subjects with MS had an abnormally low sweat response in spite of relatively high skin temperatures (> 35°C) at several sites. The thermal load (kJ/kg) of these subjects at test termination was 89% higher than that of the MS subjects with a normal sweat response.


The abnormally high thermal load: could that be related to heat intolerance? In the shower, I am OK, as long as the water is cool enough. Past a very narrow temperature point, I shut down. Could the lack of sweat be causing some fatigue, dizziness, loss of control, due to inadequate cooling?

I wonder too, 1eye. What does having nearly double the thermal load do to a person? And with myelin conductivity worsening when hotter, what a double whammy.
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Postby Filmmaker » Wed Apr 06, 2011 10:32 am

hum, could thermal load mean inflammation? And how would general inflammation affect sweating ability?
Or could the lack of sweating be actually the cause of thermal load as sweating is a mechanism to cool down inner temperature...
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Postby Cece » Wed Apr 06, 2011 10:56 am

Or could the lack of sweating be actually the cause of thermal load as sweating is a mechanism to cool down inner temperature...

That is how I interpreted it.
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Postby ThisIsMA » Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:06 pm

Filmmaker wrote:I wonder if there is a difference in this lack of sweating between RRMS and SPMS... It's only when I became SPMS that I noticed this problem... But sometimes I have drenching nightsweats though... weird...


Maybe this is a longshot but since CCSVI is positional (different veins drain the brain when standing versus when lying down) maybe you're able to sweat at night because your brain drainage (blood flow/oxygenation) is better when you're horizontal!
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Postby 1eye » Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:23 pm

I seem to have similar conversations with menopausal women, who complain of night sweats and broken thermostats. I have had strange incidents of sweating buckets on a sudden, but always when upright. Once it happened when I was in a crouch, knee-bend type of position. The common denominator there, was I had my winter coat on in a heated store. Thermal load must have had something to do with it.

The menopausal connection is intriguing...
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