venous hypoxia, could this be part of the puzzle?

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

venous hypoxia, could this be part of the puzzle?

Postby ThisIsMA » Sun Apr 10, 2011 11:03 am

Here's a recent journal article on venous hypoxia:

http://content.karger.com/produktedb/pr ... doi=320624

Journal of Vascular Research
Vol. 48, No. 3, 2011

Venous Hypoxia: A Poorly Studied Etiological Factor of Varicose Veins

Abstract

Venous hypoxia has long been postulated as a potential cause of varicosity formation. This article aimed to review the development of this hypothesis, including evidence supporting and controversies surrounding it. Vein wall oxygenation is achieved by oxygen diffusing from luminal blood and vasa vasorum. The whole media of varicosities is oxygenated by vasa vasorum as compared to only the outer two-thirds of media of normal veins. There was no evidence that differences exist between oxygen content of blood from varicose and non-varicose veins, although the former demonstrated larger fluctuations with postural changes. Studies using cell culture and ex vivo explants demonstrated that hypoxia activated leucocytes and endothelium which released mediators regulating vein wall remodelling similar to those observed in varicosities. Venoactive drugs may improve venous oxygenation, and inhibit hypoxia activation of leucocytes and endothelium. The evidence for hypoxia as a causative factor in varicosities remains inconclusive, mainly due to heterogeneity and poor design of published in vivostudies. However, molecular studies have shown that hypoxia was able to cause inflammatory changes and vein wall remodelling similar to those observed in varicosities. Further studies are needed to improve our understanding of the role of hypoxia and help identify potential therapeutic targets.

Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


Slowed perfusion is a known symptom found in brain MRI's of people with MS. If blood is leaving the brain in a more deoxiginated state because it is traveling through the brain more slowly due to CCSVI, and if that is causing venous hypoxia of the IJVs, azygous, and for that matter of the blood vessels in the brain itself, then this study seems to indicate that it could be causing the vein wall remodeling seen in MS (change from collegen 1 to collegen 3) and even triggering the MS inflamatory and autoimmune process (leucocytes).

I know varicose veins are not the same as stenosed jugular veins, but this recent study seems to point toward a similar process at work (at least that's how it seems to my cog fog impaired, though previously very bright brain). I think I remember reading that the shift from collegen 1 to collegen 3 seen in vein tissue samples of people with CCSVI, also occurs in people with varicose veins.

This study does bring an interesting question to mind: If we are born with venous "birth defects" (inverted valves, etc), would it be more effective to balloon them early in life, before the vein walls become less elastic due to vein wall remodeling because of venous hypoxia? Would early intervention be less likely to restenose than it would later in life once the vein wall has become stiffer?

Speculating wildly of course (I have not yet read that vein hypoxia is a part of CCSVI, and I am not a medical professional), but its interesting!

Mary Ann
DX 6-09 RRMS
User avatar
ThisIsMA
Family Elder
 
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: USA

Advertisement

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Apr 10, 2011 11:37 am

if you search the forums for posts containing the term 'hypoxia' there are 412 results, extending back to 2004. if you read search results starting from the oldest and paging forward into the time frame when the ccsvi forum started, you start to see ccsvi topics with posts including the term hypoxia. here's an early example:
http://www.thisisms.com/ftopicp-52408.html#52408
happy reading! :)
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9104
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Postby 1eye » Sun Apr 10, 2011 12:43 pm

It seems to me like a self-perpetuating problem which will have a tendency to get worse over time. For that reason, rather than testing juveniles for CCSVI, they should be being treated! An ounce of prevention... The veins themselves are plugged somehow, which means not enough oxygen gets to the veins, so the veins get worse. 'MS' is a secondary effect!
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2970
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Postby Cece » Sun Apr 10, 2011 1:52 pm

While it's good to read up on what's been said before, I see the conversations here as being more like at a party, where I might talk about hypoxic veins with one person at one point in the evening and have the same conversation, just as enjoyably, with another later on. (Not that I have ever talked about hypoxic veins at a party. But I totally would, if anyone were interested.)

I started a thread on this very research paper a few days ago and somehow ended up quitting diet coke almost immediately. Strange things can happen when discussing this topic.

If our blood is hypoxic enough to affect the brain, it is likely hypoxic enough to affect the veins, which exist in a state of low oxygen to begin with. (That came up in the intimal hyperplasia research.) I agree with what you've posted.
Cece
Family Elder
 
Posts: 9040
Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2010 3:00 pm

Postby cheerleader » Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:39 pm

Cece wrote:I started a thread on this very research paper a few days ago and somehow ended up quitting diet coke almost immediately. Strange things can happen when discussing this topic.


YAY!!!! Great news, Cece.
It's an excellent paper, no matter how many times we all read it. Dr. Zamboni's original premise, The Big Idea, was that varicosities and ulcers in the legs looked like MS lesions. He was looking at it from the iron deposition angle, but the hypoxic angle is equally intriguing--and the two can certainly be co-existant. The vein remodeling from Collagen type I to Collagen type III is another piece of the puzzle. It's all connected, and very exciting to see the research coming in from different specialties.

Here's my fav thread ever on this topic----the Hypoperfusion thread started by Shayk--
http://www.thisisms.com/ftopic-7708-day ... ia-60.html
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
User avatar
cheerleader
Family Elder
 
Posts: 5075
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 2:00 pm
Location: southern California

Re: venous hypoxia, could this be part of the puzzle?

Postby Blaze » Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:37 am

ThisIsMA wrote:
I know varicose veins are not the same as stenosed jugular veins, but this recent study seems to point toward a similar process at work (at least that's how it seems to my cog fog impaired, though previously very bright brain).



Varicose veins and stenosed jugular veins may not be the same, but you may be interested in this posting on another CCSVI website by a Scottish professor of medicine.

http://ccsvi-ms.ning.com/profiles/blogs ... n-improves

Professor James references work in the 1980s by an Irish physician who found stripping varicose veins resulted in improvements in MS symptoms. Even compressing the veins seemed to help. That physician, like Dr. Z, encountered great resistance.

For the first time ever, I wish I had varicose veins which I could have stripped to see it it works for me.
User avatar
Blaze
Family Elder
 
Posts: 405
Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 2:00 pm


Return to Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI)

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service