Heat Intolerance?

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Postby David1949 » Wed Jul 13, 2011 2:45 pm

A few years ago I was not bothered by heat, but now I am. It's been in the upper 80's and humid around here the last few days so I've been staying in the air conditioned house. When I get too warm I become lethargic and my symptoms get worse. Temps below 78 work better for me.

Many MSer have mentioned that they don't sweat. Sweating is the body's way of cooling off, so I wonder if the body temp goes up when we don't sweat? That would certainly make us feel worse. In my case it seems that I only sweat on the top of my head under my hat. The rest of me does not seem to sweat.
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Postby 1eye » Wed Jul 13, 2011 4:24 pm

The top of your head is where the heat ends up. The body cools itself by sweating, but also by redistributing the heated blood elsewhere. That's why, when I go out for walks, my feet end up overheating too. It will move the blood away from the core, and maybe also the head, where a lot of heat accumulates. Maybe if our drainage is too slow, we can't remove head heat fast enough by letting it drain out to be replaced by cooler blood from elsewhere. We're talking small fractions of a degree here, because the control is usually quite good.
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Postby pklittle » Wed Jul 13, 2011 5:18 pm

Someone needs to perform a clinical study on heat intolerance. Just to make sure it's "real" ya know. 8O Who knows, perhaps we're all imagining it. :?
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Postby munchkin » Wed Jul 13, 2011 5:27 pm

They would have to double blind the study before it could be considered and it would take about 5 years before there would be enough proof. Then they would have to find a drug that could maybe help some of us. :lol:
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Heat intolerance

Postby Ned » Wed Jul 13, 2011 6:07 pm

I used to be extremely heat intolerant, have that gross fatigue that sends you to bed for a couple of hours to recover from having a shower, etc.
I was in a bad way, but then I discovered Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN). The heat intolerance, fatigue, bladder/bowel probs, stiffness & more Vanished. I then found 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP), & this is excellent for leg weakness.
Both these drugs are compounded, very cheap and WORK!!

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Postby eric593 » Wed Jul 13, 2011 11:31 pm

Heat intolerance was one of the first methods used to diagnose MS, pre-MRI. Anyone suspected of MS would be immersed in a bathtub of hot water. If your symptoms worsened, you got the diagnosis.

The electrical short-circuiting analogy has been the one given by neurologists for decades to explain the phenomenon.
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research would be good

Postby fee001 » Thu Jul 14, 2011 6:36 am

Hi!


Now this kind of research would really interest me.

If it is the lack of blood circulation, they need to find the reasons why, by finding the cause
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Postby EJC » Thu Jul 14, 2011 9:57 am

Like many have already reported, Emma also suffers terribly with changes in weather.

Her window of comfort is 4 degrees either side of about 17 celcius.

Anything outside of that range is too hot or too cold.

Goldilocks syndrome!
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Postby dania » Thu Jul 14, 2011 10:45 am

Not only am I heat sensitive but I am sensitive to humidity. I love winters with freezing temps as the humidity in my house is around 40% because of the heating. Right now in my home with the air conditioning it is 65-70%.
I noticed that I am stronger the closer we get to midnight, as my body temp is lower. I am at my worst in the afternoon when my body temp is at it's highest. When I need some strength such as tranfering myself in my wheelchair, I drink water with a lot of ice. Within 5 minutes what I can do it. Where as before I drank the ice water I could not.
I am thinking of getting a cold vest.
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Postby fee001 » Thu Jul 14, 2011 10:52 am

Dania,

That is all so very interesting.


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Postby esta » Thu Jul 14, 2011 12:37 pm

so could it be the less the flow, the less the variant in temp tolerance?
equates the degree of CCSVI, because its all about blood flow...

excluding internal temp with ice because then its more science/math stuff i just go crosseyed about, but, someone...
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Postby fee001 » Thu Jul 14, 2011 12:49 pm

Hi!

But restricted blood flow in the neck, maybe Atlas related, which would then be the cause and not another symptom.

If that makes sense.

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Postby Loobie » Thu Jul 14, 2011 12:59 pm

We'll never know, until it's studied and CCSVI is perfected (let's hope it gets there) if CCSVI is the culprit. I myself don't think so. I know that everyone's central nervous system functions at a lower level in the heat. Think about how heat would zap you even when you were healthy. I mean when I would run long distances, if it was brutally hot out, it was always harder and I think everyone feels that way to a point.

So put a compromised immune system in the heat and you can REALLY notice it. It's like my neuro. originally explained ON to me. Let's say your optic nerve is made up of 100,000 microfibres. Yet you may only need 50,000 of them to see. So it can be working on you for a while until it trips into taking away the 50,000 good ones and that's when you notice. So it's much less noticeable when you don't need 100% of your CNS to function at peak capacity to function normally. But when you do, that's when the fun starts.
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Postby mavis » Thu Jul 14, 2011 2:45 pm

munchkin wrote:The ideal temp for me is 21 C with cloud. The sun, humidity, and over 20 C does me in. It's like a complete exhaustion, all my limbs are heavy.


I am very much like you munchkin. When it is hot or humid I feel my legs are like jello. Cold kinda keeps them together. I need to feel borderline cold (which is difficult in the summer) in order to function. That's why I like the winter.
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Postby rusty2 » Thu Jul 14, 2011 7:21 pm

I have what I call "hot head". When I wash dishes I look like I just stepped out of the shower. My head sweats and nowhere else. When I had my angio last November it disappeared, I mean really disappeard. I could feel the difference between feeling cold and hot. Lasted 5 wonderful days.
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