Swollen foot

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Swollen foot

Postby fiddler » Thu Jul 14, 2011 3:07 pm

For the last few weeks my left (most affected side) foot has been swollen, especially after a day of sitting at a desk. Has anyone had success in dealing with such issues, post (or pre) liberation? Besides not sitting at my desk all day or taking Lasix (which will probably be prescribed, if it doesn't improve), I mean.
... Ted
Dx SPMS in 2004.  Liberated 29/04/2010.
My blog: www.my-darn-ms.blogspot.com
User avatar
fiddler
Family Elder
 
Posts: 398
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2009 4:00 pm
Location: Fredericton, Canada

Advertisement

Postby dania » Fri Jul 15, 2011 7:39 am

My left foot is very swollen. Cannot put a shoe on. Tried diuretics but it made no difference. When I had the procedure my foot was normal 5 hours later. I restenosed and the swelling returned,
User avatar
dania
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1088
Joined: Wed May 12, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: St Lazare Quebec

No restenosis

Postby fiddler » Fri Jul 15, 2011 8:42 am

I was checked out a few weeks ago, and my blood flow (in my jugulars) seems to be good, so that doesn't seem to be the issue.
...Ted
Dx SPMS in 2004.  Liberated 29/04/2010.
My blog: www.my-darn-ms.blogspot.com
User avatar
fiddler
Family Elder
 
Posts: 398
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2009 4:00 pm
Location: Fredericton, Canada

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Jul 15, 2011 9:32 am

an interesting read. the peripheral edema in stage four is relevant to this discussion. vitamin b1 features strongly in the klenner protocol for MS. i have also seen zinc linked to peripheral edema (ie foot swelling due to abnormal fluid accumulation).

HTH.

*****
http://intelegen.com/nutrients/five_sta ... ciency.htm

Five Stages of Nutrient Deficiency Leading to Disease
by Richard Gerber

In 1964 Myron Brin published a classic analysis of the five stages in the development of a vitamin or nutrient deficiency. He illustrated the schema with reference to vitamin B1 (thiamin).

In the first, or preliminary stage, inadequate B1 availability due to faulty diet, malabsorption or abnormal metabolism leads to a greatly reduced urinary B1 loss.
In the second, or biochemical stage, the activity of a key enzyme—transketolase—which is activated by B1, is significantly reduced. Adding B1 to a blood sample from a person at this stage increases his or her transketolase activity.
In the third, or physiologic stage, various general symptoms develop, such as lessened appetite, insomnia, increased irritability, and malaise.
In the fourth, or clinical stage, a constellation of symptoms classically specific to B1 deficiency disease (beri-beri) develops: e.g., intermittent claudication, polyneuritis, bradycardia, peripheral edema, and ophthalmoplegia (paralysis of eye muscles).
In the fifth, or anatomical stage, histopathological changes due to cellular structural damage are seen, such as cardiac hypertrophy, degeneration of the cerebellar granule layer, and swelling of the microglia.8

Although Brin’s five-stage deficiency schema is exemplified with regard to B1, it is in principle applicable to any nutrient, as Brin himself notes. Brin’s schema is especially illuminating with regard to the RDAs, since the “just preventing failure of specific functions” and “just preventing specific deficiency signs” criteria of nutritional requirement, which is the basis of the RDA concept, are only evidenced in the fourth (clinical) and fifth (anatomical) stages of developing nutritional deficiency disease.

The first three stages, although they are objectively, empirically measurable and observable phases of a developing nutrient deficiency, do not involve either “specific deficiency symptoms” or “failure of a specific nutrient-related function.” What follows from this is quite simple. The RDA level of nutrient intake may keep most people out of the severe illness-leading-to-death fourth and fifth nutrient deficiency stages, but RDA nutrient levels cannot be presumed to be adequate to keep one out of the first three stages of “subclinical” deficiency, let alone in a more optimal, vibrant, energized state of health.
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 8983
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby dania » Fri Jul 15, 2011 9:43 am

When I had the second procedure, again the swelling in my foot disappeared. I restenosed again and the swelling came back. Maybe you have a stenosis somewhere else than your jugulars that is causing this.
User avatar
dania
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1088
Joined: Wed May 12, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: St Lazare Quebec

Postby Thekla » Fri Jul 15, 2011 11:33 am

I have feet/leg swelling. I do not know what part is lymph and what is vascular. I had no for almost a month after my first treatment. Round 2 is next week, so we'll see what happens.

I have read of a few with MT who had swelling/pain and were treated.
User avatar
Thekla
Family Elder
 
Posts: 142
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: Germany

Postby munchkin » Sat Jul 16, 2011 1:42 pm

Did anyone see Dr.Snyder's post
Dr. Salvi began with presentation on diagnosis of CCSVI. Presented some anecdotal data linking a decrease of pedal edema
User avatar
munchkin
Family Elder
 
Posts: 309
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 3:00 pm
Location: Canada


Return to Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI)

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service