How do we turn off the immune system activated?

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Re: How do we turn off the immune system activated?

Postby sou » Sun Nov 13, 2011 10:59 am

Vikingquest wrote:MS has a substantial autoimmune component and that is a fact.


This is not a fact. This is a speculation, based on (so far) unproven hypotheses. If anybody have any proof, here is the Nobel prize.
Shortest joke: "We may not be able to cure MS but we can manage its symptoms."
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Re: How do we turn off the immune system activated?

Postby sou » Sun Nov 13, 2011 11:04 am

Cece wrote:But a double-whammy of stopping the damage (if CCSVI venoplasty can stop the damage) and then remyelinating is a beautiful idea.


No, it isn't.

Comi G. Is it clinically relevant to repair focal multiple sclerosis lesions? J. Neurol. Sci 2008 Feb;265(1-2):17-20.

There is much more damage to the CNS than myelin.
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Re: How do we turn off the immune system activated?

Postby Cece » Sun Nov 13, 2011 12:24 pm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21904791
Myelin regeneration in multiple sclerosis: targeting endogenous stem cells.

Huang JK, Fancy SP, Zhao C, Rowitch DH, Ffrench-Constant C, Franklin RJ.

Source

MRC Cambridge Centre for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, and Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, United Kingdom, CB3 0ES.

Abstract

Regeneration of myelin sheaths (remyelination) after central nervous system demyelination is important to restore saltatory conduction and to prevent axonal loss. In multiple sclerosis, the insufficiency of remyelination leads to the irreversible degeneration of axons and correlated clinical decline. Therefore, a regenerative strategy to encourage remyelination may protect axons and improve symptoms in multiple sclerosis. We highlight recent studies on factors that influence endogenous remyelination and potential promising pharmacological targets that may be considered for enhancing central nervous system remyelination.

There is gray matter damage, there is NAWM, there are jugular malformations, there is a diminishing-over-time capability of plasticity, there is demyelination. I say we do our best to address as many of these issues as we can!
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Re: How do we turn off the immune system activated?

Postby orion98665 » Thu Nov 17, 2011 7:55 pm

Vikingquest wrote:"Autoimmune theory is almost debunked"

Seriously, all credibility just went out of the window. MS has a substantial autoimmune component and that is a fact. CCSVI has a success rate which is all over the map, it is the most unreliable treatment out there. HSCT has an 80% success rate across the board with a 100% rate with RRMS, give or take a few percentage points, that's pretty spectacular. If ablating the immune system does this, then to claim that that ms isn't an autoimmune disease is just silly.




Thought this article was interesting:

http://www.expert-reviews.com/doi/full/ ... /ern.10.69

Or this one

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article ... ool=pubmed
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Re: How do we turn off the immune system activated?

Postby Cece » Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:47 pm

First, nearly 60 years of EAE-based research yielded not a single MS-halting therapy. This in itself should be an important reason to consider a shift in research direction

Second, neurodegeneration is now regarded as an important component in MS. It is neurodegeneration rather than demyelination that contributes to long-term disability. Several pathological and MRI studies indicate that grey matter involvement is early and extensive. Axonal transection may be degenerative, inflammatory or both, but brain and spinal cord atrophy is considered to be the direct result of neurodegeneration. If we accept axonal degeneration and neuronal loss to be essential features, then MS no longer fulfils the original criteria of a primary demyelinative disease and comparison with EAE becomes even less apposite.

Third, the most neglected aspect of MS research is prevention, and we believe that this again is explained by the erroneous assumption of autoimmunity.

Finally, of all the environmental risk factors associated with MS, vitamin D seems the most easily modified.22 In a longitudinal follow-up study of over 90 000 women, those taking vitamin D supplements had a 40% lower incidence of MS than those who did not
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Re: How do we turn off the immune system activated?

Postby orion98665 » Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:51 pm

Just another interesting research paper:

http://www.expert-reviews.com/doi/full/ ... ern.10.174
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