shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby Cece » Sun Dec 04, 2011 8:48 pm

http://news.yahoo.com/shift-may-put-tee ... E4ODU5MzAz

Did everyone catch this study, which showed that people between the ages of 16 and 20 who work overnight shifts or odd hours are twice as likely to develop multiple sclerosis as people who do not work such odd hours?

I think there's a possible explanation to this: people with CCSVI may be drawn to shift work or odd hours. Core temp is at its highest during the day. People with CCSVI may feel better as core temp goes down, and thus be more inclined to work at night. Also people with CCSVI may have disturbed sleep and circadian rhythms, which might also prompt one to take work at odd hours.

So my suggestion is not that the shift work is a risk promoter for MS, but that CCSVI is present congenitally in people who go on to develop MS, and that people with CCSVI are more likely to take on shift work for the above reasons.
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Re: shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby cheerleader » Sun Dec 04, 2011 10:04 pm

Hi Cece-- had seen that study and wrote about it on FB when it came out in October---interesting thought that pwMS might seek out shift work. I looked at it from another angle, I thought it might be linked to stress and cortisol....

In the news yesterday, a new study showing how shift work (night time work outside of normal daytime hours) doubles a teen's risk of developing Multiple Sclerosis. This is considered an "environmental factor" as opposed to a genetic factor. This new paper comes from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and was published in the Annals of Neurology. The researchers did not propose a specific theory as to how shift work might increase the risk of MS, but they did comment on how circadian rhythm disruption might affect melatonin and the immune system.
Here is the complete paper:
http://sverigesradio.se/diverse/appdata ... /11395.pdf

Oddly enough, just last week, another published study showed how shift work raises the risk of metabolic disease, higher body mass index (BMI) and cardiac problems in young adults vias cortisol release. This study was undertaken by Dutch researchers and published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology-- only a week prior to the Swedish study.

Here's the abstract for that paper on shift work:
http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/ea ... 1.abstract

Shift work, or work outside standard daytime hours, has been associated with an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and cortisol plays a major role in the development of the disease.

Manenschijn and colleagues looked at normal cortisol in shift workers versus day workers by measuing levels of this stress hormone in scalp hair. One centimeter of hair represented a period of about one month. They also speculated that higher BMI correlated to long-term cortisol levels.

The researchers also found was that this cortisol increase was the highest and had the most negative affect on the younger participants in the study, via an increase in their higher BMI rates.

Ther authors suggested that older shift workers suffered from less stress than their younger colleagues or simply adjusted better to unconventional hours. Also, sleep patterns and circadian rhythms change as people grow older, which may have muted the impact of shift work on cortisol levels in older people.

Cortisol is a known endothelial disrupter and can create hypertension and cardiovascular problems as well as metabolic disease. This is why stress is a known factor in heart disease.

We also already know a few environmental risk factors for young people in developing MS-

SMOKING- Here's the John's Hopkins study showing how teen smoking increased the risk of developing MS by 2.7 times
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/gim/news ... -3-09.html

OBESITY and HIGER BMI--The Nurses' Health Study showed this doubled the risk of teen girls later developing MS
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 173400.htm

And now, we can add shift work to the list of environmental factors in teens, and perhaps cortisol increases in the young. What is interesting is to note that each of these environmental factors affects the vasculature, via endothelial disfunction. Each of these risks is linked to vasoconstriction and impaired blood flow. If one can step away from the autoimmune theory of MS and see the disease from the perspective of Dr. Zamboni's research (or that of Rindfleisch, Putnam, Fog and Swank) it makes sense.
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby David1949 » Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:16 pm

Its also possible that people who work nights sleep during the day and don't get as much Vitamin D from sunlight. When I was in college I worked nights at a steel factory, during summer vacation. I would usually go to bed at about 7:00 am and get up around 3:00 pm.

Hmmm. I guess we should also find higher rates of MS in vampires. :-)
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Re: shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby CuriousRobot » Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:22 pm

Same. As a kid, used to stay up til 3-5am, all through high school and first two years of college. John Lennon's words of protest always came to mind:

"Please, don't wake me, no, don't shake me
Leave me where I am, I'm only sleeping..."
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Re: shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby cheerleader » Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:30 pm

you know...this is really making me think, Cece.
Jeff was a jazz musician for the first 10 years of our marriage, and I was an opera singer...we never got to sleep before 1am. He always enjoyed working late and sleeping in. We were never "morning people." Having our son changed our schedule, since babies wake up at 5am...and we eventually switched our habit. but this makes me wonder if Jeff's career was tied into his brain's circulation. hmmmmm.....would be interesting to know how many people choose shift work because of their nocturnal energy pattern vs. no other job options.
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby David1949 » Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:33 pm

CuriousRobot wrote:Same. As a kid, used to stay up til 3-5am, all through high school and first two years of college. John Lennon's words of protest always came to mind:

"Please, don't wake me, no, don't shake me
Leave me where I am, I'm only sleeping..."


Looks like we have not changed our nocturnal habits. I posted at about midnight and you posted after me. It's about 12:30 am now.
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Re: shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby munchkin » Wed Dec 07, 2011 6:58 am

Apparently shift work is also related to Type 2 diabetes
Shift work raises Type 2 diabetes risk
from the CBC Health news. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q= ... 6w&cad=rja
This affects more women as does depression, Chronic Fatigue, Lupus and I am pretty sure there are more. Most of these have an unknown origin but are linked to the immune system. Altered blood flow at work in other ways?
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Re: shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby Cece » Wed Dec 07, 2011 7:44 am

cheerleader wrote:you know...this is really making me think, Cece.
Jeff was a jazz musician for the first 10 years of our marriage, and I was an opera singer...we never got to sleep before 1am. He always enjoyed working late and sleeping in. We were never "morning people." Having our son changed our schedule, since babies wake up at 5am...and we eventually switched our habit. but this makes me wonder if Jeff's career was tied into his brain's circulation. hmmmmm.....would be interesting to know how many people choose shift work because of their nocturnal energy pattern vs. no other job options.
cheer

It's interesting, isn't it.
I never chose shift work, but would have been open to it, because I was slow to get going in the mornings and often felt my best right before bed.

If people with CCSVI are drawn, even by some small percentage, to shift work, and then because of shift work they get their cortisol levels disturbed and less sunshine and interrupted sleep, then that is salting the wound....
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Re: shift work may put teens at risk of MS study

Postby CureIous » Wed Dec 07, 2011 11:26 pm

Between 16 and 20 that's about all I worked was nights.
RRMS Dx'd 2007, first episode 2004. Bilateral stent placement, 3 on left, 1 stent on right, at Stanford August 2009. Watch my operation video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwc6QlLVtko, Virtually symptom free since, no relap
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