White matter in nonelderly adults is 1.7 - 3.6% blood

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

White matter in nonelderly adults is 1.7 - 3.6% blood

Postby Cece » Sat Dec 31, 2011 1:29 pm

White matter in nonelderly adults is 1.7 - 3.6% blood.
Just a factoid, to support the idea that blood flow may of significance to the health of the white matter of the brain.

It came from here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_matter

attributed to this article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2302536

Cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen utilization. Normal values and effect of age.

Leenders KL, Perani D, Lammertsma AA, Heather JD, Buckingham P, Healy MJ, Gibbs JM, Wise RJ, Hatazawa J, Herold S, et al.

Source

MRC Cyclotron Unit, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK.

Abstract

Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction ratio (OER), oxygen utilization (CMRO2) and blood volume (CBV) were measured in a group of 34 healthy volunteers (age range 22-82 yrs) using the 15O steady-state inhalation method and positron emission tomography. Between subjects CBF correlated positively with CMRO2, although the interindividual variability of the measured values was large. OER was not dependent on CMRO2, but highly negatively correlated with CBF. CBV correlated positively with CBF. When considering the values of all the regions of interest within a single subject, a strict coupling between CMRO2 and CBF, and between CBF and CBV was found, while OER was constant and independent of CBF and CMRO2. In 'pure' grey and white matter regions CMRO2, CBF and CBV decreased with age approximately 0.50% per year. In other regions the decline was less evident, most likely due to partial volume effects. OER did not change or showed a slight increase with age (maximum in the grey matter region 0.35%/yr). The results suggest diminished neuronal firing or decreased dendritic synaptic density with age.

Cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume and cerebral oxygen utilization decrease by .5% every year? Something to think about on my next birthday!
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Re: White matter in nonelderly adults is 1.7 - 3.6% blood

Postby cheerleader » Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:00 pm

This is the new frontier in brain research, Cece. It's pretty exciting, actually--because researchers are saying it isn't about a "cure" for Alzheimers or dementai--it's about increasing cerebral blood flow before we become elderly. One of the best ways to do that it moving--

Brisk walking several times per week bestows benefits in just 3 months
In a 3-month study of 16 women age 60 and older, brisk walking for 30-50 minutes three or four times per week improved blood flow through to the brain as much as 15%.

Rong Zhang, the lead researcher discussed the team's findings in a presentation titled, "Aerobic exercise training increases brain perfusion in elderly women" at the Experimental Biology meeting (EB 2011), being held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington, DC.


Another way to keep cerebral blood flow going is to use your mind in activities like hobbies, puzzles, making music, learning a new language, staying social and engaged in life.
http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/dept/sergi ... iesCBF.pdf

And nutrition and lifestyle matter. Living a heart healthy, or endothelially healthy life, will keep cerebral perfusion optimized. The good news is that we can take control in our younger years to make sure our brains are healthier as we age. And dealing with venous malformations is a good thing, too.
Here's to a healthier 2012 for us all!
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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