Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disease.

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disease.

Postby dania » Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:13 am

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Re: Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disea

Postby Cece » Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:51 am

Dr. Benson is a neurologist and has worked with fMRI imaging and SWI MRI iron imaging. I am not sure what he will be presenting.
Randall Benson, MD, Medical Director of the Novi, MI-based Center for Neurological Studies (CNS), will present research before an international symposium on neurovascular disease on February 22 in Orlando, FL. Dr. Benson’s presentation will center on the role blood flow to the brain may impact such diseases as Multiple Sclerosis (MS).
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Re: Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disea

Postby Cece » Fri Feb 17, 2012 3:30 pm

Another article on presentations at ISNVD.
www.bizjournals.com/buffalo/news/2012/0 ... earch.html
Zivadinov will provide opening remarks on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and the hypothesis that the condition may be the result rather than a cause of MS.

How could the patient we've been discussing in Dr. Sclafani's thread have developed CCSVI in her jugulars, if CCSVI is a result of the MS she did not have?
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Re: Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disea

Postby Robnl » Mon Feb 20, 2012 4:20 am

Cece,

Well, Zivadinov also said that CCSVI is not unique to MS, that CCSVI is seen in more neurological diseases.....
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Re: Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disea

Postby Cece » Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:25 pm

But doesn't the question remain which came first, the CCSVI or the neurological disease?

Dr. Benson spoke today at ISNVD. Here is Arlene Hubbard's report:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hubbard- ... 9665829860
Randall Benson(neuro)
Idiopathic intracranial hypertension:similarities and differences with CCSVI
Neuros think about veins only when putting in IV’s(LOL)
Learned the importance of veins through Dr Haacke
*Complimented Dr Hubbard’s BOLD work!

Compelling evidence that pseudo tumor has a relationship to CCSVI.
This disorder effects over weight females and the best tx is weight loss. Symptoms:
HA, tinnitus, visual problems
Signs: papilledema with loss of vision, major morbidity is visual loss , Normal appearing ventricular system, increased CSF pressure,tranverse sinus collapse
It’s idiopathic
CSF is produced in the ventricles filtered through the arachnoid granulations into the venous system.
Causes of intracranial hyupertension
High dose vit a, long term antibiotics, hormonal contraceptives, sleep apnea, SLE, chronic kidney disease.

Diagnosis may be suspected on the basis of the hx and exam, swollen optic nerve head,
Similarities with CCSVI
Focal stenosis in the dural sinus outflow have previously been demonstrated in 30-90%
*A study showed 94% resolution of papilledema with stenting.
the more acutely marginated stenosis have intralumial cause. Bilat stenosis at transverse sigmoid junction is a marker on imaging .
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Re: Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disea

Postby Cece » Sun Jun 10, 2012 3:57 pm

Dr. Randall Benson, a neurologist, discussed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH): similarities &
differences with CCSVI. Hypertension has no known cause. Usually affects overweight females. One of the
best treatments is weight loss. It involves elevated intracranial pressure, increased CSF pressure. Tinnitus,
Eye pain, and TVO are unique symptoms. No known cause, but maybe sleep apnea, kidney disease,
systemic lupus are involved. Diagnosis involves swollen optic nerve head, can also do imaging or spinal tap.
Similarities with CCSVI include stenosis in the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. Recent study showed 18/18
IIH patients had venous outflow compromise. Stenting has helped patients. Papilledema resolved in 15/16
patients and has not recurred. Not sure if it is cause or effect of IIH.

18 out of 18 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension had venous outflow compromise? Every last one of them...

Weight loss is good for nutcracker syndrome (because nutcracker phenomenon and not nutcracker syndrome is seen mostly in patients who are young and thin), weight loss is good for idiopathic intracranial hypertension...could weight loss be good for CCSVI?

And does the FDA know about the venous stenting for patients with IIH? You never know, they might want to release an alert !!
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Re: Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disea

Postby DougL » Mon Jun 11, 2012 9:37 am

Cece wrote:...could weight loss be good for CCSVI?

i would guess Yes.

overerweight has long been associated with poor circulation

pwCCSVI already have a compromised circulation system. i would suggest doing everything to improve it. diet, excercise, vitamins, drugs, surgery.
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Re: Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disea

Postby 1eye » Mon Jun 11, 2012 10:23 am

Cece wrote:And does the FDA know about the venous stenting for patients with IIH? You never know, they might want to release an alert !!
The whole thing about migration is overblown, since only 1 migration to the heart has occurred, out of all our venous stents.

All veins flow blood towards the heart/lungs, where it gets new oxygen. Generally the system's diameters get wider in that direction.

Theoretically any stent in a vein can do this. The difference with veins above the heart is that any muscular force is augmented, rather than hindered, by upright gravity. Upright, gravity helps prevent stent migration towards the heart when the stent is below it. Experts will be well aware of our early incident, (2009) and provide for it in new stent placements. I would not worry about it myself, since restenosis and thrombosis are much more likely, and much less risky.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
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Re: Dr. Benson International Society for Neurovascular Disea

Postby Cece » Mon Jun 11, 2012 9:33 pm

For what it's worth, there have been two stent migrations reported here at TiMS.
stent migration #1 - R. (stent migrated to heart, treated by immediate open heart surgery)
stent migration #2 - a friend of erika slovakia's (stent migrated to heart and integrated into wall of heart, treated by conservative monitoring)
we have also heard of a stent migration where the stent budged slightly from where it was originally placed, so that it was sticking down a bit into the innominate vein and slightly disrupted flow there... please don't let the FDA quote me on this, I can't remember where I read about that one.
but considering the number of procedures done, the risk of stent migration seems to be minimal, at least in the jugular veins.
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