Diamox

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Diamox

Postby Cece » Mon Sep 17, 2012 10:14 am

still keeping all ideas on the burners, and it'd be nice to hear more about the possibilities of Diamox for MS/CCSVI

It was mentioned in this abstract, on intracranial hypertension
http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/83/5/488.abstract
Update on the pathophysiology and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

Valérie Biousse1,2, Beau B Bruce1,2, Nancy J Newman1,2,3
1Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
2Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
3Department of Neurological Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Correspondence to
Dr V Biousse, Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Emory Eye Center, 1365-B Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Abstract
Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disease of unknown aetiology, typically affecting young obese women, producing a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without identifiable cause. Despite a large number of hypotheses and publications over the past decade, the aetiology is still unknown. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding the pathophysiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. There continues to be no evidence based consensus or formal guidelines regarding management and treatment of the disease. Treatment studies show that the diagnostic lumbar puncture is a valuable intervention beyond its diagnostic importance, and that weight management is critical. However, many questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, CSF shunting procedures and cerebral transverse venous sinus stenting.

Acetazolamide is Diamox.

and from wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetazolamide
Acetazolamide has been used for the treatment of sufferers of glaucoma. When used to treat glaucoma, acetazolamide inhibits production of HCO3-. In health, it is the production of HCO3- which draws Na+ into the eye; water follows by osmosis to form the aqueous humour. In glaucoma treatment, the goal is often to reduce the intraocular pressure and acetazolamide does this by reducing production of aqueous humour.[3]

Off-label uses include acetazolamide as a conjunction drug to merely assist patients with central sleep apnea by lowering blood pH and encouraging respiration.

Acetazolamide forces the kidneys to excrete bicarbonate, the conjugate base of carbonic acid. By increasing the amount of bicarbonate excreted in the urine, the blood becomes more acidic.[12] Acidifying the blood stimulates ventilation, which increases the amount of oxygen in the blood.[13][14] At high altitudes, climbers hyperventilate in response to lower oxygen levels. The hyperventilation results in reduced carbon dioxide (an acid) and a respiratory alkalosis. The normal physiologic response to a respiratory alkalosis is for the kidneys to increase excretion of bicarbonate (a base) to compensate for the loss of carbon dioxide. This kidney response takes a few days, however acetazolamide in a sense accelerates this process by leading to a more rapid renal bicarbonate loss (metabolic acidosis).

It's not known if Diamox will be useful in CCSVI or not but it seems like a potential option.
We've discussed Diamox in the past, I was just reminded of it by the IIH abstract.
Cece
Family Elder
 
Posts: 9018
Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2010 4:00 pm

Advertisement

Re: Diamox

Postby PointsNorth » Mon Sep 17, 2012 10:57 am

I've been taking diamox every night for the last six months for better sleep. I do not typically take during the day but it is great for naps too.

PN
Albany 2010. Brooklyn 2011
Hayes inspired Calcitriol+D3 2013-2014
Coimbra Protocol 2014-
PointsNorth
Family Elder
 
Posts: 521
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: LeftCoast Canada

Re: Diamox

Postby munchkin » Mon Sep 17, 2012 4:40 pm

Dr.Arata recommended Diamox to help with pressure in my brain. He was not able to open my lijv and the rijv is only open approx 20%. Diamox helps me sleep better at night and I dream. It has helped with mood and with waking during the night. This has been one of the more helpful medications.
User avatar
munchkin
Family Elder
 
Posts: 309
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 3:00 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Diamox

Postby 1eye » Thu Sep 20, 2012 8:36 am

Dr. Diana recommended this stuff to me and I asked my (new) GP about it. I had just come from an aphasia group seminar where the person who gave the talk was an ordinary person who just happened to have climbed Mt. Everest. She said Diamox is very commonly used by mountain climbers for (acute) altitude sickness. That is one thing, but taking it regularly for MS sounds like it might have ramifications. My doctor did not prescribe it for me. I do not want to leave it at that, especially since munchkin dreams on the stuff. I do not dream. Not that I don't remember them. I am wakened on occasion for various reasons. My understanding is that you remember dreams when you wake in the middle of them. I very rarely remember dreaming, and the ones I do remember are short. I used to have long dreams before MS. I dreamed quite a lot after my procedure. I don't dream anymore, and it is one of the reasons I think I may have a clot or a restenosis.

It sounds like the answer to other problems I have with sleeping. Does it help you sleep? What is the down side? Are there any doctors you are aware of who will prescribe it? I am not the self-medicating type but I feel like some help is better than none.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2920
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Warning on Diamox

Postby MarkW » Thu Sep 20, 2012 9:05 am

Please only use Diamox under medical supervision. The body has its normal pH for many reasons. Using this drug for short term altitude sickness is completely different to long term use.
MarkW

Diamox/Acetazolamide forces the kidneys to excrete bicarbonate, the conjugate base of carbonic acid. By increasing the amount of bicarbonate excreted in the urine, the blood becomes more acidic.[12] Acidifying the blood stimulates ventilation, which increases the amount of oxygen in the blood.[13][14] At high altitudes, climbers hyperventilate in response to lower oxygen levels. The hyperventilation results in reduced carbon dioxide (an acid) and a respiratory alkalosis. The normal physiologic response to a respiratory alkalosis is for the kidneys to increase excretion of bicarbonate (a base) to compensate for the loss of carbon dioxide. This kidney response takes a few days, however acetazolamide in a sense accelerates this process by leading to a more rapid renal bicarbonate loss (metabolic acidosis).
Mark Walker - Oxfordshire, England. Registered Pharmacist (UK). 11 years of study around MS.
Mark's CCSVI Report 7-Mar-11:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/8359854/MS-experts-in-Britain-have-to-open-their-minds.html
User avatar
MarkW
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1149
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: Oxfordshire, England

Re: Diamox

Postby munchkin » Thu Sep 20, 2012 9:46 am

My GP runs blood work monthly to ensure my levels are fine (I think it's the electrolites). It's important to make sure your blood pressure is alright. One other issue is that your body can get used to the amount of drug and you might have to increase the dosage.
User avatar
munchkin
Family Elder
 
Posts: 309
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 3:00 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Diamox

Postby 1eye » Thu Sep 20, 2012 9:50 am

That's one of the pieces of information I was looking for. It doesn't explain the down-side very well. What if my blood being more acidic was not the least side-effect, and it was not even a problem for me? At least Dr. Diana might have some advice on that score. If you''re excreting more sodium, does that affect your ability to 'pump' CSF? In a good way, or bad? Could you make your explanation less technical? You have not explained the possible problems with long-term use, and PN is apparently taking it regularly for sleep (or is it as-needed?). Yes, we need doctors, but sometimes they have declined, and we've had to help ourselves. I especially don't like being patronized, and treated like a mushroom (keep them in the dark and feed them sh-t and watch them grow). The doctors here don't like being asked questions because the line-ups are long, waiting-rooms are full, and they get paid by throughput.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2920
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Re: Diamox

Postby PointsNorth » Thu Sep 20, 2012 10:27 am

Hi 1eye,

I only take 1tab every night along with some other things and that seems to ensure a decent sleep-which I cannot live without. I dream in technicolour. My doc would no longer prescribe Zopiclone which knocked me out like Smokin' Joe (no dreams) so I had to move to Aminitryptiline sp? which i believe is an off-label use of the anti-depressant drug. Also use something called Super Sleep (Tryptophan+) as well. I think Dr. D was using Diamox for more than just sleep. PM me if you want more info.

PN
Albany 2010. Brooklyn 2011
Hayes inspired Calcitriol+D3 2013-2014
Coimbra Protocol 2014-
PointsNorth
Family Elder
 
Posts: 521
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: LeftCoast Canada

Re: Diamox

Postby Cece » Sat Mar 23, 2013 9:01 am

Someone mentioned in another thread that diamox has been helpful to her, which is great news.
I think Diamox should be studied in MS.

Dr. Driscoll's poster presentation on Diamox: http://prettyill.com/downloads/FINAL_Di ... 2_2012.pdf
A case report of Diamox used successfully in an MS patient: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9868321
Research from 1975 on Diamox used in 9 MS patients looking specifically at paroxysmal symptoms: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC491885/

Diamox is made by Teva Women's Health.
http://www.drugs.com/answers/what-is-th ... 41885.html
http://investing.businessweek.com/resea ... pId=267538
Cece
Family Elder
 
Posts: 9018
Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2010 4:00 pm

Re: Diamox

Postby dania » Sat Mar 23, 2013 9:11 am

I believe that was me. Diamox is a big help for me.
User avatar
dania
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1088
Joined: Wed May 12, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: St Lazare Quebec


Return to Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service