MN-166 (and CCSVI)

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

MN-166 (and CCSVI)

Postby 1eye » Thu Nov 01, 2012 9:39 am

I am posting this also to CCSVI Locator as they have this article:

http://ccsvi-ms.ning.com/profiles/blogs ... es_network

My comment:

MN-166 and CCSVI treatment?

I thought you didn't start getting a lot of black holes until secondary progression. Why would a drug that reduces progression (which I presumed was indicated by the fact that the black holes were persistent) not be tested on progressive MS? It sounds to me like the wrong cohort of patients was used for this trial. The lesion count was not significantly reduced at year one, but the conversion of lesions to black holes as well as brain atrophy were reduced. Both of these are not signs of relapses but of progression. The fact that the time to relapse was also reduced indicates that this may be the first disease modifying drug that really modifies the disease.

This medication is used in Japan for asthma and the treatment of cerebra-vascular disorders! CCSVI could be being treated by this drug! That might be why it treats progression. Perhaps the reason it does not show a reduction in lesion count is that (in the first year anyway) the drug has not affected the source of the problem (blocked drainage) but will protect the brain from lesions turning into black holes because the micro-vasculature is affected by the drug, and the blood and food supply to the neurons is affected enough to prevent the neurons from dying.

The brain atrophy could be coming from one of two known places. If it is caused by higher pressure in the veins, CSF, or even arteries, it is not real atrophy, but compression of the brain matter by on-compressible fluid pressure. It could also be that the neuronal loss is reduced, and the atrophy is really reduced because the black holes are less frequent. Or t could be a combination of pressure and black holes that caused the shrinkage.

Either way, CCSVI treatment reduces the root cause of the problem, which can only be good for the micro-vasculature as well. If that is true, then the combination of MN-166 and CCSVI treatment can only be even more successful. Plus, since we are not combining drugs which reduce the immune system's ability to react to infection, the combination should not cause anything like PML or other malignant disorders. The people taking it should not have any more problems than the ones taking it for asthma.


The "MS" discriminatory and predatory re-pricing problem will likely occur for this drug as well. The vendor will try to sell this drug as well at some astronomical price, into a market saturated with greedy overpaid pushers of usurious priced drugs. If it is as good as claimed, it should be able to sell at one tenth of the price of the worst of these, and still put them all out of business.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2886
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Advertisement

Re: MN-166 (and CCSVI)

Postby Cece » Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:29 am

In January of 2012 MediciNova was awarded a method of use patent that would expire no earlier than 2029 and covers a method of treating primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) or secondary progressive MS (SPMS) by administering ibudilast either alone or in combination with other drugs. The patent application is based upon clinical investigations conducted by MediciNova researchers which showed an apparent disease-modifying benefit in which brain volume loss, or brain atrophy, commonly associated with disease progression, was reduced by oral administration of ibudilast to a group of multiple sclerosis patients including some subjects with progressive multiple sclerosis, in a dose-related fashion over at least a 10-month treatment period.

http://www.medicinova.com/html/research ... etoverview

It's patented for progressive MS. It's been tested on some progressive MS subjects, I wonder if that research is available?
This could be a winner.
Very interesting ideas on how it could be affecting CCSVI, 1eye.
Cece
Family Elder
 
Posts: 8994
Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2010 4:00 pm


Return to Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI)

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service