Cerebral Blood Flow in MS and RVLM and CBF

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Cerebral Blood Flow in MS and RVLM and CBF

Postby Anonymoose » Tue Jan 15, 2013 1:20 pm

The last of my open tabs...yay!
http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/6140655
Cerebral blood flow and red cell delivery in normal subjects and in multiple sclerosis.
(PMID:6140655)
Swank RL, Roth JG, Woody DC Jr
Neurological Research [1983, 5(1):37-59]

Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined in 77 normal females and 53 normal males of different ages and in 26 men and 45 women with multiple sclerosis by the inhalation of radioactive Xe133 method. In the normal subjects the CBF was relatively high in the teens and fell, at first rapidly and then slowly in both sexes with age. During adult life the flow in females was significantly higher than in males. The delivery of packed red cells (RCD) was determined by multiplying the CBF by the percentage concentration of red cells (HCT). The RCD for both sexes was nearly the same. In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease.


NVC inhibits rvlm activity. A working RVLM increases CBF.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2559371
Stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medullary neurons increases cortical cerebral blood flow via activation of the intracerebral neural pathway.
Saeki Y, Sato A, Sato Y, Trzebski A.
Department of Physiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan.
Abstract
In urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated rats, electrical or chemical (by L-glutamate) focal stimulations of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) produced an increase in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF). The RVLM-induced cortical vasodilative response was present in animals with spinal cords sectioned at levels of Th3-4 and with bilateral extracerebral cervical sympathetic trunks (CSTs) severed. The RVLM-induced cortical vasodilative response was totally eliminated by an alpha 2 adrenergic blocker, but not by blockers for muscarinic, nicotinic, alpha 1 and beta receptors. It was concluded that there is an intracerebral vasodilative neural pathway including an alpha 2 adrenergic receptor originating in the RVLM for regulation of cortical blood vessels.


Would increased CBF increase the rate at which CSF is drained/fed?
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Re: Cerebral Blood Flow in MS and RVLM and CBF

Postby Cece » Thu Jan 17, 2013 3:39 pm

interesting, anonymoose, thanks!
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Re: Cerebral Blood Flow in MS and RVLM and CBF

Postby Anonymoose » Thu Jan 17, 2013 4:27 pm

So much interesting stuff out there!

I've just started reading Dr. S's thread from start to finish. You asked better questions as a CCSVI newbie than I do. lol
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Re: Cerebral Blood Flow in MS and RVLM and CBF

Postby Cece » Fri Jan 18, 2013 10:06 am

You are ambitious. I also saw you posting about the symposium videos. Good stuff.
Would increased CBF increase the rate at which CSF is drained/fed?

What do you think?
I think outflow obstructions that decrease the outflow rate will decrease the rate at which cerebrospinal fluid is drained, since the cerebrospinal fluid drains through arachnoid granulations into the sinuses which drain into the obstructed jugulars. I don't think you can do much to increase the cerebral blood flow if the outflow is obstructed.
In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease.

This is the older research that shows reduced perfusion in people with MS. The explanation given by neurologists is that the diminished brain needs less blood flow, because of atrophy etc. It's a different way to consider it if the reduced perfusion is contributing to the progress of the disease.
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Re: Cerebral Blood Flow in MS and RVLM and CBF

Postby Anonymoose » Fri Jan 18, 2013 10:40 am

Cece wrote:What do you think?
I think outflow obstructions that decrease the outflow rate will decrease the rate at which cerebrospinal fluid is drained, since the cerebrospinal fluid drains through arachnoid granulations into the sinuses which drain into the obstructed jugulars. I don't think you can do much to increase the cerebral blood flow if the outflow is obstructed.

I would think yes it would. But that's just a hunch. I've been off on so many other tangents since I thought about this. And now I'm off on a tangent about capillary hypertension...have you been holding back on us? Spill!! Details!
Cece wrote:This is the older research that shows reduced perfusion in people with MS. The explanation given by neurologists is that the diminished brain needs less blood flow, because of atrophy etc. It's a different way to consider it if the reduced perfusion is contributing to the progress of the disease.

It's funny how looking at the same thing can cause two polar responses. I wouldn't have made that assumption at all. Of course, maybe that's because I don't know enough. :)
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Re: Cerebral Blood Flow in MS and RVLM and CBF

Postby Cece » Fri Jan 18, 2013 10:52 am

Have you read Dr. Tucker's contributions? That was where I got some of my information about capillary hypertension. Let's see...
chronic-cerebrospinal-venous-insufficiency-ccsvi-f40/topic17667.html
Dr. Tucker has posted here from time to time. Physics and equations and modeling of blood flow. I had to really slow down and read to understand and I know there's more there that I don't yet understand. It's quite possible that the physics modelling of the hemodynamics will help CCSVI gain acceptance.

I'm interested in the cortisol tangent if you find more of that, I think it was on the general discussion pages that I was following a conversation about that? I didn't realize that cortisol levels drop in the evening.
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Re: Cerebral Blood Flow in MS and RVLM and CBF

Postby Anonymoose » Fri Jan 18, 2013 12:10 pm

Ooo! Thanks for the link. I've only just skimmed through the excerpt of ttucker's paper you posted. I'll have to read it in greater detail. It makes a lot of sense to me but then that paper on short term blood flow changes causing lesions pops back into my head. I'll have to read that one again too...and some other tabs on capillary hypertension I have open. lol Curiosity. If I were a cat, I'd probably be dead.

Regarding the cortisol, did you see my lab results post today? Kind of exciting stuff about cortisol and CAP, I think.
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