May 2013 Zamboni research

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May 2013 Zamboni research

Postby Cece » Sun May 19, 2013 4:25 pm

http://koti.mbnet.fi/hiihoo/ccsvi/The%2 ... %20the.pdf
The omohyoid muscle entrapment of the internal jugular vein. A still unclear pathogenetic mechanism

Sergio Gianesini1, Erica Menegatti1, Francesco Mascoli2,
Fabrizio Salvi3, Stefano Bastianello4 and Paolo Zamboni1

Abstract
Objectives: To evaluate the role of the omohyoid muscle anatomic variants as a possible reversible cause of internal
jugular vein extrinsic compression.

Method: We describe a chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency patient, who presented a omohyoid muscle entrapment
of the internal jugular vein, confirmed by both magnetic resonance venography and ultrasound investigation.
A omohyoid muscle surgical transection together with a patch angioplasty was performed.

Results: The surgical procedure led to both IJV flow restoration and neurological improvement.

Conclusions: The omohyoid muscle compression on the internal jugular vein seems to be a possible cause of venous
obstruction, but several anatomical and patho-physiological aspects need further investigations. Such picture might cause
balloon venous angioplasty inefficacy and needs to be preoperatively considered.

Two things were treated: a muscle was snipped that was compressing the jugular, and the jugular itself underwent a patch angioplasty, which is when the jugular is cut lengthwise and a patch of additional vein is sewn in to make the jugular bigger.

Since both a patch angioplasty and a muscle transection occurred, then we don't know which of the two procedures gets the credit for the neurological and blood flow improvements, but there were improvements!
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Re: May 2013 Zamboni research

Postby Cece » Tue May 28, 2013 12:46 pm

The possible pathogenetic role of muscular compression in determining a clinically significant IJV obstructionis still controversial and open in literature.3 ECD permits to verify that closing the jaw increases this external compression. At the same time ECD demonstrates how a prolonged yawning can restore the lumen patency, so suggesting a possible open procedure to re-establish the brain venous outflow.4 Subsequently, this observation was confirmed by Simka.5 Both in our case report and in Simka’s one,5 the OM contraction (yawning and opening the mouth, respectively), which means an IJV compression, led to an unexpected vein widening.

Yawning caused the vein to widen.
I am trying yawning right now, it does not feel like it does anything for me one way or the other!
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Re: May 2013 Zamboni research

Postby David1949 » Fri May 31, 2013 7:05 pm

When I yawn I can lift my left leg far higher than I can normally. When I try to yawn intentionally it still works but not as well as a genuine unintentional yawn. Wierd!!
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Re: May 2013 Zamboni research

Postby dania » Sat Jun 01, 2013 7:50 am

David1949 wrote:When I yawn I can lift my left leg far higher than I can normally. When I try to yawn intentionally it still works but not as well as a genuine unintentional yawn. Wierd!!

David, you are moving your jaw when yawning. This may allow more CSF flow which could be your problem. You might ask Dr Flanagan who could provide you with a better answer.
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Re: May 2013 Zamboni research

Postby 1eye » Sat Jun 01, 2013 10:23 am

When I yawn I can lift my left leg far higher than I can normally. When I try to yawn intentionally it still works but not as well as a genuine unintentional yawn. Wierd!!
The intention part of the yawn-leg connection might be significant. I have something wrong with my nerves that neurologists have identified as intention tremor... the result is that when moving the hand with the tremor, the closer I get to an intended target, the worse the tremor gets, to the point where I overshoot many times in a row before arriving, seemingly only by accident.

Yours sounds like it is connected to leg movement, and maybe oxygenation due to larger veins while yawning, or maybe the faster removal of some byproduct of movement in your brain. Or maybe it is a coincidence. Personally, coincidences are against my religion. :smile:
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
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