good commentary

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

good commentary

Postby erinc14 » Mon Sep 23, 2013 7:32 am

Regarding Murray Mandryk's Sept. 11 column, Saskatchewan spends millions of dollars each year for drugs to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). These drugs cost from $25,000 to $60,000 per person per year. Two of the drugs in longest use (the interferons betas and copaxone) have been shown to have no effect on longterm progression of MS. Yet these drugs are still on the formulary and are still being prescribed.

Whether newer drugs like Tysabri have an effect on long-term progression is unknown. However, one thing is clear: Tysabri is deadly for a significant number of people with MS. As of May 2013, 359 out of 100,000 people treated with Tysabri have developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Of these 83 have died, with the majority of the rest being severely disabled.

For people with MS who are diagnosed with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and are treated with venous angioplasty, one-third report major improvements that last from months to years, one-third report minor improvements that are long-lasting and one third report no improvements. Only few report adverse effects


http://www.leaderpost.com/health/treatm ... story.html
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Re: good commentary

Postby frodo » Mon Sep 23, 2013 3:10 pm

erinc14 wrote:Regarding Murray Mandryk's Sept. 11 column, Saskatchewan spends millions of dollars each year for drugs to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). These drugs cost from $25,000 to $60,000 per person per year. Two of the drugs in longest use (the interferons betas and copaxone) have been shown to have no effect on longterm progression of MS. Yet these drugs are still on the formulary and are still being prescribed.

Whether newer drugs like Tysabri have an effect on long-term progression is unknown. However, one thing is clear: Tysabri is deadly for a significant number of people with MS. As of May 2013, 359 out of 100,000 people treated with Tysabri have developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Of these 83 have died, with the majority of the rest being severely disabled.

For people with MS who are diagnosed with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and are treated with venous angioplasty, one-third report major improvements that last from months to years, one-third report minor improvements that are long-lasting and one third report no improvements. Only few report adverse effects


http://www.leaderpost.com/health/treatm ... story.html


Great finding!! Sometimes journalist can catch a big truth in just a simple sentence in a way so clear that admits no questions. Even more clear if we consider that venoplasties and drugs are not exclusive. Let's hope someday our rulers will see it as clear as I do.
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