damaged bbb reduces flow

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

damaged bbb reduces flow

Postby Cece » Tue Nov 05, 2013 7:31 am

http://www.opticsinfobase.org/boe/fullt ... &id=260788
Image
Fig. 1 (a) Hypothetical illustration of the blood flowing through an artery (or arteriole), capillaries and a vein (or venule), subsequently, in the condition of intact BBB. (b) Same representation for a compromised blood brain barrier, wherein the venous output (red arrow) is decreased. The input and output blood volumes are represented by white and red arrows, respectively. (c) Hypothetical transverse velocity profile along the dotted line (b) and definition of the different parameters measured and analyzed in this study. The maximal velocity amplitude is represented by the vertical arrow, the vessel diameter (full width at half maximum) is represented by the horizontal arrow, and the area under the transverse velocity profile is represented by the shaded area.


(known fact) In MS, the blood-brain barrier is often damaged.
(fact from this article) When the BBB is compromised, venous output is decreased. This is because of leakage.

Anything that further decreases venous output would be a problem in an already compromised venous drainage system.

This is a difference between the healthy controls with CCSVI and the MS patients with CCSVI. Even if all venous blockages were equal, wouldn't the MS patients with CCSVI have worse flow than the healthy controls with CCSVI because of the effect of the compromised blood-brain barrier on flow? I don't know how great the effect would be, it could be negligible.
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Re: damaged bbb reduces flow

Postby erinc14 » Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:04 am

i'm reading "grain brain " and it said gluten damages the bbb. 8O
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Re: damaged bbb reduces flow

Postby NHE » Wed Nov 06, 2013 5:31 am

Cece wrote:(known fact) In MS, the blood-brain barrier is often damaged.
(fact from this article) When the BBB is compromised, venous output is decreased. This is because of leakage.


Could it also be due to turbulent flow?
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Re: damaged bbb reduces flow

Postby cheerleader » Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:46 am

erinc14 wrote:i'm reading "grain brain " and it said gluten damages the bbb. 8O


Gluten contains the protein zonulin, which acts as the gate keeper for the endothelium (the lining of our blood vessels) Zonulin signals the gate to open, and lets thru larger proteins and plasmic particles. This is especially a problem for the intestines and the blood brain barrier.

Endothelial dysfunction can be systemic---sometimes we can see it in blood spots on the legs (called petechiae) or in irritable bowel. There are all kinds of things that make the endothelium more permeable. Gluten is one. Low vitamin D and B levels are another. Lack of physical exercise and shear stress is another. So are transfats.

Cece--not sure how much this would affect overall flow, but it sure isn't a good thing!

NHE--yup. Turbulent flow is one of the real baddies in creating endothelial dysfunction----the blood vessels want smooth, strong flow. Laminar shear stress is necessary for tight junctions in the BBB.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/12/40

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Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: damaged bbb reduces flow

Postby NHE » Fri Nov 08, 2013 12:14 am

cheerleader wrote:NHE--yup. Turbulent flow is one of the real baddies in creating endothelial dysfunction----the blood vessels want smooth, strong flow. Laminar shear stress is necessary for tight junctions in the BBB.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/12/40


My thinking was that turbulent flow could be partly responsible for the reduced output (the reduction in size of the red arrows in the diagram) as it's less efficient. Therefore, less blood will flow through the capillary bed. Since less blood will get through, the size of the white arrow in the second diagram should decrease. The way the diagram is currently presented, it attributes the entire reduction in output to leakage across the BBB. That's a lot of leakage. My point was that there could be other aspects of the blood flow which also contribute to a loss of output.

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