New--Treating CCSVI modifies endothelial dysfunction

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

New--Treating CCSVI modifies endothelial dysfunction

Postby cheerleader » Fri May 09, 2014 5:45 pm

Endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro spinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis modifies circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation: a prospective study
http://journals.lww.com/bloodcoagulatio ... 99197.aspx

We performed a monocentric observational prospective study to evaluate coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis undergoing endovascular treatment for cerebro-spinal-venous insufficiency. Between February 2011 and July 2012, 144 endovascular procedures in 110 patients with multiple sclerosis and chronical cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency were performed and they were prospectively analyzed. Each patient was included in the study according to previously published criteria, assessed by the investigators before enrollment. Endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation parameters were determined before the procedure and during follow-up at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months after treatment, respectively. After the endovascular procedure, patients were treated with standard therapies, with the addition of mesoglycan. Fifty-five percent patients experienced a favorable outcome of multiple sclerosis within 1 month after treatment, 25% regressed in the following 3 months, 24.9% did not experience any benefit. In only 0.1% patients, acute recurrence was observed and it was treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy. No major complications were observed.
Coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters were shown to be reduced at 1 month and stable up to 12-month follow-up, and they were furthermore associated with a good clinical outcome. Endovascular procedures performed by a qualified staff are well tolerated; they can be associated with other currently adopted treatments. Correlations between inflammation, coagulation activation and neurodegenerative disorders are here supported by the observed variations in plasma levels of markers of coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction.



The first question I asked Jeff's neuro was "why was his blood hypercoagulated?" It would take much more unraveling to learn about hypoxia, the coagulation cascade and endothelial dysfunction. So glad this is now being monitored after CCSVI treatment. We've seen the same benefit for Jeff---still, five years later, his c-reactive protein, SED rate and other endothelial markers are great.

Here's more on the coagulation cascade and endothelial dysfunction. This connection to MS is not new. Dr. Swank noted it in the 1950s. We're getting there.
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com/2014/03/b ... tters.html

cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: New--Treating CCSVI modifies endothelial dysfunction

Postby Cece » Fri May 09, 2014 6:50 pm

After the endovascular procedure, patients were treated with standard therapies, with the addition of mesoglycan.

There's always something new to learn...what's mesoglycan, and should I be taking it? Because I'm already reminded from the other thread on sunshine that I'd like to get a phototherapy lamp!

http://www.naturalhealthyconcepts.com/m ... MgodF0YAog

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Re: New--Treating CCSVI modifies endothelial dysfunction

Postby cheerleader » Fri May 09, 2014 8:50 pm

Yeah...interesting stuff, huh, Cece? Had never heard of it. (Glad you're looking into phototherapy, too!)
The supplement is usually made of ground up pig or cow glands....I wonder if this is what the group used for anticoagulation after treatment (instead of heparin, warfarin, coumadin, etc.) Don't think it's anything we'll add to Jeff's program.

Mesoglycan belongs to a broad class of compounds called glycosaminoglycans (GAG). GAGs, also called mucopolysaccharides, are amino hexose polysaccharides contained in mucoproteins, glycoproteins, and blood group substances. GAGs are a heparinoid (non-heparin) byproduct of heparin extraction from cow lung tissue or aorta, and pig intestinal mucosa (15). Mesoglycan specifically is composed of dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate, with smaller concentrations of chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, and related hexosaminoglycans (6614). The concentrations of these substances can vary depending on the origin of the product. People try it for vascular conditions because it seems to have numerous pharmacological effects on the vascular system. Mesoglycan exhibits profibrinolytic activity without influencing hemaglutination in humans after oral administration (6631, 6642). It seems to also decrease plasma fibrinogen concentrations without affecting prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, or antithrombin III (6633). Mesoglycan might restore normal fibrinolysis in patients with reduced cutaneous fibrinolytic activity (6634). However, mesoglycan has been shown to prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (6629). Mesoglycan seems to reduce pericapillary connective tissue edema, and capillary and venule dilation, in patients with primary venous insufficiency (6630). It also improves arterial wall elasticity, trancutaneous oxygen perfusion, and blood flow (6643, 6644). Mesoglycan reduces total and VLDL triglyceride concentrations and increases lipoprotein lipase activity in patients with hypertriglyceridemia (6646). It reduces total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, and increases HDL cholesterol concentrations in patients recovering from cerebral ischemic episode (6633).
Adverse Reactions:
Orally, nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, heartburn, headache, diarrhea, and local cutaneous reactions have been reported (6629).
There is some concern about potential contamination. Mesoglycan is derived from raw animal tissues gathered from slaughterhouses, possibly from sick or diseased animals. Products made from contaminated or diseased organs might present a human health hazard. There is also concern that mesoglycan produced from cows in countries where bovine spongiform encephalitis (BSE) has been reported might be contaminated with diseased tissue. Countries where BSE has been reported include Great Britain, France, The Netherlands, Portugal, Luxembourg, Ireland, Switzerland, Oman, and Belgium (1825). However, there have been no reports of BSE transfer to humans from contaminated mesoglycan products. Until more is known, tell patients to avoid these products unless country of origin can be determined. Patients should avoid products that are produced in countries where BSE has been found.
Interactions with Herbs & Supplements:
ANTICOAGULANT/ANTIPLATELET HERBS AND SUPPLEMENTS: Concomitant use of herbs and supplements that affect platelet aggregation could theoretically increase the risk of bleeding in some people. Some of these herbs include angelica, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, Panax ginseng, and others.

http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresea ... eSupport=1
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: New--Treating CCSVI modifies endothelial dysfunction

Postby drsclafani » Fri May 09, 2014 10:41 pm

cheerleader wrote:Endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro spinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis modifies circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation: a prospective study
http://journals.lww.com/bloodcoagulatio ... 99197.aspx

We performed a monocentric observational prospective study to evaluate coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis undergoing endovascular treatment for cerebro-spinal-venous insufficiency. Between February 2011 and July 2012, 144 endovascular procedures in 110 patients with multiple sclerosis and chronical cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency were performed and they were prospectively analyzed. Each patient was included in the study according to previously published criteria, assessed by the investigators before enrollment. Endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation parameters were determined before the procedure and during follow-up at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months after treatment, respectively. After the endovascular procedure, patients were treated with standard therapies, with the addition of mesoglycan. Fifty-five percent patients experienced a favorable outcome of multiple sclerosis within 1 month after treatment, 25% regressed in the following 3 months, 24.9% did not experience any benefit. In only 0.1% patients, acute recurrence was observed and it was treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy. No major complications were observed.
Coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters were shown to be reduced at 1 month and stable up to 12-month follow-up, and they were furthermore associated with a good clinical outcome. Endovascular procedures performed by a qualified staff are well tolerated; they can be associated with other currently adopted treatments. Correlations between inflammation, coagulation activation and neurodegenerative disorders are here supported by the observed variations in plasma levels of markers of coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction.



The first question I asked Jeff's neuro was "why was his blood hypercoagulated?" It would take much more unraveling to learn about hypoxia, the coagulation cascade and endothelial dysfunction. So glad this is now being monitored after CCSVI treatment. We've seen the same benefit for Jeff---still, five years later, his c-reactive protein, SED rate and other endothelial markers are great.

Here's more on the coagulation cascade and endothelial dysfunction. This connection to MS is not new. Dr. Swank noted it in the 1950s. We're getting there.
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com/2014/03/b ... tters.html

cheer

cheer only 55% had any positive benefits and 25 of these had benefits that lasted only one month. Likely patients were undertreated
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Salvatore JA Sclafani MD
Patient contact: ccsviliberation@gmail.com
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