Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

Postby PointsNorth » Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:09 am

Even the control group was low in vitamin D! Can vitamin D eliminate dysfunction? CCSVI? Calling Dr. Coimbra.

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/blog/stu ... ca034eaa9h
Albany 2010. Brooklyn 2011
Hayes inspired Calcitriol+D3 2013-2014
Coimbra Protocol 2014-16
DrG B12 Transdermal Spray 2014-16
Progesterone 2015-16
Low-Dose Immunotherapy 2015-16
My Current Regimen http://www.thisisms.com/forum/regimens-f22/topic25634.html
PointsNorth
Family Elder
 
Posts: 682
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: LeftCoast Canada

Advertisement

Re: Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

Postby 1eye » Wed Sep 30, 2015 5:18 pm

Traditionally, cheerleader pops up at this point to cheer for the endothelium. I was ignorant myself, and called it a wrong technical-sounding name. I will now cheer for it myself.

In conclusion, our study demonstrates that vitamin D deficiency is common and is associated with endothelial function, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in PD. Vitamin D supplementation is simple cheap, and may reverse endothelial dysfunction.


This is important. Probably all here have endothelial dysfunction. It almost a universal part of aging (and many medical conditions). This study looked at something called Flow-Mediated-Dilation, or FMD.

FMD is merely the effect of the flow of blood on the blood-vessels themselves, causing dilation to occur. This dilation is one of the two most basic and important functions of a blood-vessel: dilation and contraction.

The swelling (dilation) and shrinking (contraction) must remain healthy. The balance between them keeps blood vessels from permanently shrinking or swelling. This critical balance (also called tone) is the responsibility of the thin smooth muscle that lines most blood vessels, including those in your brain and neck.

To see how important blood vessels, from large to tiny are, consider that adults have 60,000 miles of them. Thus all of this smooth muscle must be the highest drain on energy in the body. It is also the primary source and distributor of body heat. It consumes a huge amount of the food we eat.

They critically must remain healthy. It is an easy thing to keep them that way. Cheerleader has developed a program which is designed to help you ensure this.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 3418
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Re: Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

Postby cheerleader » Thu Oct 01, 2015 8:06 pm

Yay! Endothelial pom poms ahoy! :YMHUG: :YMPARTY: ^:)^ :-!
But seriously....

this is a very cool study, PN. Thanks for posting.
The endothelium controls oh so much more than vessel dilation. It is where the immune system and vacular system meet. It's how the blood brain barrier is maintained. Our endothelial cells are vital...and can be harmed by low vitamin D levels. But there are many environmental factors which help or harm these cells, and D is important, but it's not alone.
If you haven't really read the program PN, here it is...I try to explain it all in clear language. Honest. Thanks for the recommendation, 1eye!
http://ccsvi.org/index.php/helping-myse ... ial-health

Exciting to see the reseachers looking at endothelial dysfunction in PD----
there is a vascular connection to all diseases of neurodegeneration. And that's hypoperfusion, related to endothelial dysfunction. In simple English--slowed cerebral blood flow, due to injured endothelial cells (both in and outside the brain)
http://ccsvi.org/index.php/the-basics/c ... l-diseases
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
User avatar
cheerleader
Family Elder
 
Posts: 5342
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 3:00 pm
Location: southern California

Re: Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

Postby 1eye » Fri Oct 02, 2015 2:05 pm

Is it true that slowed perfusion must be due to too much shrinking (contraction), not dilation, if it is caused by endothelium dysfunction? I have also seen mention of complete die-off of capillaries in MS. Seems to me that would also hinder perfusion big-time...
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 3418
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Re: Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

Postby cheerleader » Sat Oct 03, 2015 1:11 pm

1eye wrote:Is it true that slowed perfusion must be due to too much shrinking (contraction), not dilation, if it is caused by endothelium dysfunction? I have also seen mention of complete die-off of capillaries in MS. Seems to me that would also hinder perfusion big-time...


Slowed cerebral perfusion is created by a cascade of events which fall under the heading of "endothelial dysfunction". Dying endothelial cells deposit microparticles in blood, which cause hypercoagulation, oxidative stress and slow flow. Blood vessels do not get enough nitric oxide from remaining endothelial cells, and they close down (and sometimes die). Shear stress is slowed, which continues death of cells. Slowed flow is delivering less O2 and glucose to neurons, and they begin to die. The blood brain barrier becomes permeable, as endothelial cells no longer maintain tight junctions. It's a nasty cycle of death and destruction.

Here are some recent papers which outline this process in MS---

Multiple sclerosis and cerebral endothelial dysfunction: Mechanisms.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20663648

Impairment of endothelial function in patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25789590

[Multiple sclerosis and endothelial dysfunction (a review)].
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24416810

Microparticles in multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome: effect on endothelial barrier function
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/15/110

When I was asking the Stanford endothelial researchers about the connection in 2008, there wasn't much published. Really glad to see more interest. Would LOVE to see a paper which puts it all together....Dr. Alexander and other members of the ISNVD are working on that. Getting there.
Blood circulating microparticle species in relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.
http://www.jns-journal.com/article/S002 ... 3/abstract

cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
User avatar
cheerleader
Family Elder
 
Posts: 5342
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 3:00 pm
Location: southern California

Re: Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

Postby 1eye » Sun Oct 04, 2015 1:47 pm

That last url doesn't work, as shown. However, if you cut an paste the whole url (including the ")00309-3/abstract" part, it works fine.

http://www.jns-journal.com/article/S0022-510X%2815%2900309-3/abstract seems to work ok. I created that by selecting the whole url and pressing the URL button. The result is, it puts '[url]' at the front of the text, and '[/url]' at the end of the selection.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 3418
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Re: Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

Postby PointsNorth » Tue Oct 06, 2015 8:43 am

Another article, vitamin D treating ischemic heart disease.

https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/blog/re ... -patients/

PN
Albany 2010. Brooklyn 2011
Hayes inspired Calcitriol+D3 2013-2014
Coimbra Protocol 2014-16
DrG B12 Transdermal Spray 2014-16
Progesterone 2015-16
Low-Dose Immunotherapy 2015-16
My Current Regimen http://www.thisisms.com/forum/regimens-f22/topic25634.html
PointsNorth
Family Elder
 
Posts: 682
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: LeftCoast Canada

Re: Endolethial dysfunction in Parkinson's

Postby PointsNorth » Wed Oct 07, 2015 10:44 am

Dr. Coimbra uses the term 'physiologic' in describing the dose level he prescribes to people with autoimmune disease like Chron's & Lupus as well as MS.

Vitamin D and and endolethial dysfunction
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25488441

Role of vitamin D in atherosclerosis
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/128/23/2517.full

More
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 2414000152
Perhaps Coimbra is having success because he is using physiologic doses over a long period of time (1-2 years). Maybe CCSVI is being reversed?
Albany 2010. Brooklyn 2011
Hayes inspired Calcitriol+D3 2013-2014
Coimbra Protocol 2014-16
DrG B12 Transdermal Spray 2014-16
Progesterone 2015-16
Low-Dose Immunotherapy 2015-16
My Current Regimen http://www.thisisms.com/forum/regimens-f22/topic25634.html
PointsNorth
Family Elder
 
Posts: 682
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: LeftCoast Canada


Return to Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI)

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service