SWI-MRI

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

SWI-MRI

Postby NHE » Thu Oct 29, 2009 4:49 pm

From the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC).

SWI-MRI image shows high iron levels in MS compared to control.

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Postby Sharon » Thu Oct 29, 2009 5:42 pm

Boy, do us MS'rs "lighten" up those images!!

Thanks for posting

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Postby fernando » Fri Oct 30, 2009 3:55 am

Thanks NHE.

One has to wonder how the autoimmunity model explains the higher iron contents in MS brains.
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Postby mrhodes40 » Fri Oct 30, 2009 8:22 am

Thanks NHE :D :D I added a link to that in the section on Dr Haackes materials in the research sticky...

page one post 2 :wink:
I'm not offering medical advice, I am just a patient too! Talk to your doctor about what is best for you...
http://www.thisisms.com/ftopic-7318-0.html This is my regimen thread
http://www.ccsvibook.com Read my book published by McFarland Health topics
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Postby Lyon » Fri Oct 30, 2009 1:37 pm

.
Last edited by Lyon on Thu Nov 24, 2011 9:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby fernando » Fri Oct 30, 2009 4:10 pm

Lyon,

There are newer histological (not fancy new technology) findings and it looks like Perls method is not very reliable:

Iron may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases by promoting oxidative damage. The localization of iron in multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains was investigated to further the understanding of its pathogenic role in these disease states. Earlier studies, utilizing a standard Perls' stain, yielded conflicting reports regarding the distribution of iron deposits in MS brains, and a previous study on AD brains utilized a diaminobenzidine (DAB) enhanced version of this stain. In the present study, a modified version of the DAB-enhanced stain was used; it utilizes sodium borohydride, proteinase K, Triton X-100 and xylenes to increase the accessibility of tissue iron to histochemical reagents. This modified method can reveal iron deposits that are missed by the Perls' or DAB-enhanced Perls' stains. In addition to its normal deposition in oligodendrocytes and myelin, iron was detected in reactive microglia, ameboid microglia and macrophages in MS brains. In AD brains, three types of plaques were stained: dense core, clear core and amorphous plaques. Punctate staining was also observed in neurons in the corticies of AD brains. The structure accounting for punctate labeling may be damaged mitochondria, lipofuscin or amyloid deposits. Dense core plaques, clear plaques and punctate labeling were not detected in the previous AD study which utilized only the DAB-enhanced Perls' stain. The labeling of these additional structures illustrates the benefit of the modified method. In summary, the localization of iron deposition in MS and AD brains indicates potential sites where iron could promote oxidative damage in these disease states


link: Iron deposits in multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease brains
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