EGCG, iron and the brain

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Postby cheerleader » Fri Sep 17, 2010 2:30 pm

Here's a note I wrote up for the Facebook page last year on this topic:

Recent studies on the usage of EGCG (green tea extract) in Multiple Sclerosis patients have shown a benefit as a neuroprotective agent - but EGCG is also a known chelator of iron and is capable of removing iron from the brain. Consider this wonderful, natural, inexpensive and non-toxic supplement. Something you can do today. Charite University in Berlin is currently conducting a clinical trial of EGCG in MS. http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00525668

(see studies below)

Recent studies in MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), indicate that already during the early phase of inflammation, neuronal pathology involving axonal transection and loss of parental cell bodies plays a critical role in disease severity. Therefore, efforts to develop new therapeutic strategies in MS must consider both inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of the disease. EGCG, has emerged as a potent neuroprotective agent for treatment of several neuropathological states associated with damaging effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS). EGCG has an inhibitory effect both on inflammation, by influencing T cell proliferation and inhibiting the activation of NF- B, and on neurodegeneration through its antioxidative potency as a free radical scavenger. In the present study we aim to evaluate the safety and neuroprotective effects of orally administered epigallocatechin-gallate in patients with relapsing-remitting MS in a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, stratified, placebo-controlled prospective 2-arm study. As a result of its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective potency, EGCG should be significantly more effective than placebo in reducing the development of new contrast enhancing and T2 lesions on the one hand, but also in their conversion into T1-hypointense lesions ( black holes ), and in arresting the disease dependent acceleration of brain atrophy, and neuronal loss or dysfunction.

link

Evidence to link abnormal metal (iron, copper and zinc) metabolism and handling with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases pathology has frequently been reported. The capacity of free iron to enhance and promote the generation of toxic reactive oxygen radicals has been discussed numerous times. Metal chelation has the potential to prevent iron-induced oxidative stress and aggregation of alpha-synuclein and beta-amyloid peptides. The efficacy of iron chelators depends on their ability to penetrate the subcellular compartments and cellular membranes where iron dependent free radicals are generated. Thus, natural, non-toxic, brain permeable neuroprotective drugs, are preferentially advocated for “ironing out iron” from those brain areas where it preferentially accumulates in neurodegenerative diseases. This review will discuss the most recent findings from in vivo and in vitro studies concerning the transitional metal (iron and copper) chelating property of green tea and its major polyphenol, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate with respect to their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/j6808g63382p0656/
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http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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no luck thus far

Postby PointsNorth » Sat Sep 18, 2010 12:06 am

Hi Cheer,

I started taking green tea extract some time ago to no avail. Although I could never remember to take with each and every meal. I will try again this coming week and report back. I believe Cece also tried but did not experience any positive results. Cece?

PN
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Postby mht220 » Sat Sep 18, 2010 2:18 am

jimmylegs wrote:zinc deficiency is linked to iron dysregulation and deposition.

ms patients are lower in zinc than controls.

average zinc levels in healthy controls, in several different studies, comes out to 18.2 umol/L.

optimizing your zinc levels can have several other benefits including:
- elevating uric acid (by converting toxic ammonia byproducts of digestion)
- apparently helps to increase d3 absorption
- increases intestinal impermeability due to strong tight junctions between cells
- toughens up that blood brain barrier
- can reverse some types of liver damage
- preventative against cancer
- sexy times

the list goes on...

JL


about 4 years ago, having heard all about zinc and how good it is and how people with ms seems to have zinc deficiency, I started to take Zinc +vitamin C , one tablet a day for a month and then I suddenly had a big relapse, after 1 year of not having any. Later on I saw an article about how possibly zinc could be bad for MS be cause it simulate and boosts the immune system in the body and things like that.

I don't know maybe it was really just a coincidence, anyway I thought let you know and ask your opinion about it.
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Postby cheerleader » Sat Sep 18, 2010 8:14 am

MS is multi-factorial, mht. One supplement or a few is not going to stop the progression of the disease. If it did, doctors would have figured it out by now. Many I've talked to believe it's a combo plate of venous insufficiency, potential bacterial/viral infection increasing BBB breakdown, immune activation, low oxygenation, and nutritional deficiency. If EGCG or zinc doesn't help you, there are many other things to look at.
Check out the endothelial health program for more info:
link to CCSVI Alliance
HTH,
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby Rokkit » Sat Sep 18, 2010 11:34 am

So I got up this morning and went down to ye old coffee shop and ordered up my first cup of green tea. I got two hours of nausea for my trouble. What the heck, is that normal?
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Postby ErikaSlovakia » Sat Sep 18, 2010 11:59 am

Rokkit wrote:So I got up this morning and went down to ye old coffee shop and ordered up my first cup of green tea. I got two hours of nausea for my trouble. What the heck, is that normal?

Hi Rokkit!
I have the same problem. Right after the first small amount of green tea I must run to the toilet because of my nausea. My stomach just do not like it.
I do not feel any problems after taking the EGCG capsules.

Maybe some people just cannot drink green tea. I can drink all types of tea just not green tea.
Erika
Aug. 7, 09 Doppler Ultras. in Poland, left Jugul. valve problem, RRMS since 1996, now SPMS,
- Nov.3,09: one stent in the left jug. vein in Katowice, Poland, LDN, never on DMDs
- Jan. 19, 11: control venography in Katowice - negative but I feel worse
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Postby concerned » Sat Sep 18, 2010 12:05 pm

Some more acidic senchas can be really hard on an empty stomache. Try matcha, it's sweet, it has more egcg, and it's mighty powerful.

It's powdered tea leaves that either grew under tree cover or under a sheet for the last two weeks before harvesting. This makes it produce more amines. It's frothy and delicious and expensive. Also, a lot of companies sell powdered regular sencha as matcha so you might want to check out brands online first.
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Postby daniel » Sun Sep 19, 2010 9:40 pm

Rokkit wrote:So I got up this morning and went down to ye old coffee shop and ordered up my first cup of green tea. I got two hours of nausea for my trouble. What the heck, is that normal?


I get the same problem if I have green tea on an empty stomach early in the morning... try it after a light meal
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IRON IS A FINE BALANCE

Postby Gordon » Tue Sep 21, 2010 10:00 am

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/low-iron-symptoms.html

What are the correct tests
What should these tests show vis a vis Iron

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Re: IRON IS A FINE BALANCE

Postby Rokkit » Tue Sep 21, 2010 12:36 pm

Gordon wrote:http://www.buzzle.com/articles/low-iron-symptoms.html

What are the correct tests
What should these tests show vis a vis Iron

Gordon

Hi Gordon, that is talking about iron level in the blood which is unrelated to accumulated iron in the brain. Currently there is no test to determine iron level in the brain with respect to MS, although Dr. Mark Haacke is developing a protocol using his SWI-MRI software. But that is a test done with MRI, it is not a blood test.

P.S. Thanks to ErikaSlovakia, Concerned and Daniel for the feedback regarding green tea. I shall persevere one way or the other.
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Postby Rokkit » Thu Jan 20, 2011 7:59 pm

concerned wrote:Some more acidic senchas can be really hard on an empty stomache. Try matcha, it's sweet, it has more egcg, and it's mighty powerful.

It's powdered tea leaves that either grew under tree cover or under a sheet for the last two weeks before harvesting. This makes it produce more amines. It's frothy and delicious and expensive. Also, a lot of companies sell powdered regular sencha as matcha so you might want to check out brands online first.


Well, I just enjoyed my first cup of matcha. I plan to drink it daily. Thanks, Concerned!
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Re: no luck thus far

Postby Cece » Thu Jan 20, 2011 9:46 pm

PointsNorth wrote:Hi Cheer,

I started taking green tea extract some time ago to no avail. Although I could never remember to take with each and every meal. I will try again this coming week and report back. I believe Cece also tried but did not experience any positive results. Cece?

PN

Just saw this, PointsNorth. No, I wasn't aware of it having any effect one way or another, but I continue to take them. For me their role as an iron chelator and the possibility of iron in our brains is enough.

Concerned, thanks for the tip on the matcha, I might try that!
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Re: EGCG, iron and the brain

Postby cheerleader » Thu Jul 19, 2012 10:40 am

Brand new research on EGCG--showing how it affects tight junctions in the human cerebral endothelium, strengthens the blood brain barrier and has therapeutic potential for endotoxing mediated endothelial inflammation.

http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/conte ... -9-161.pdf

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Re: EGCG, iron and the brain

Postby orion98665 » Sat Jul 21, 2012 4:23 pm

Has anybody taken EGCG (green tea extract) in pill form...??? Any recommendation..?? Just curious, might be easier and quicker for wife to take.
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