risks of stenting procedure

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risks of stenting procedure

Postby Sesj » Wed Nov 04, 2009 2:53 pm

I'm going to Poland for doppler/MRV/the procedure the 2nd week of December. At least I WAS going. Now I have some doubts because my ex-partner (a pathologist) thinks it's dangerous.

He asked me if there are surgeons stand-by if something goes wrong during the operation and the patient needs an emergency operation.

Does anyone here know this? How safe is this procedure?
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Postby Rokkit » Wed Nov 04, 2009 3:04 pm

It's a very low risk procedure by virtue of it being so minimally invasive. You aren't even under general anesthesia, you are mildly sedated yet wide awake. I can't imagine what purpose a standby surgeon would serve.
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Postby Sesj » Wed Nov 04, 2009 3:21 pm

That's exactly what I wanted to hear.
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Postby Loobie » Wed Nov 04, 2009 3:51 pm

Me and a few others have suffered proximal spinal accessory nerve damage during the procedure as the cath. has to go in the same sheath with that nerve. My shoulder has been screwed since July and probably will remain so for about 9 more months as nerves take an inch a month to heal. As far as I know that's the only complication other than the coumadin they put you on which is not part of the procedure, but rather the 'aftercare'. Obviously you don't want a bad bleed when your blood is thin. So it's not risk free, just very low risk. My shoulder is almost certainly not going to heal all the way, but it should somewhat.
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Postby HappyPoet » Wed Nov 04, 2009 4:18 pm

Hi Sesj,

You may want to inquire about available pain control options for both during and after the surgery.

There have been reports of severe pain during and after the procedure, although the amount of pain seems to vary directly to the amount of work done (the number of stents put into one's veins). A couple of stent patients reported having no pain. Some patients have needed Percocet while others got by with Extra Strength Tylenol.

Also, for some stent patients there seems to be a long recovery period, anywhere from two months to six months, but other patients report much faster recovery times.

Best of luck

~HP
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Postby mrhodes40 » Wed Nov 04, 2009 5:24 pm

THe person who should inform you about risks of procedures is the licensed medical professional who is treating you honestly. I would encourage everyone to ask such questions of their doctor. Ask hard questions get good answers. This is new

And to be honest with you I think it is good that you have someone in your life who is offering concerns, it gives you a chance to look at it from a different perspective and make sure you understand what you are doing.
I'm not offering medical advice, I am just a patient too! Talk to your doctor about what is best for you...
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Postby Sesj » Thu Nov 05, 2009 1:21 am

Loobie wrote:Me and a few others have suffered proximal spinal accessory nerve damage during the procedure as the cath. has to go in the same sheath with that nerve. My shoulder has been screwed since July and probably will remain so for about 9 more months as nerves take an inch a month to heal. As far as I know that's the only complication other than the coumadin they put you on which is not part of the procedure, but rather the 'aftercare'. Obviously you don't want a bad bleed when your blood is thin. So it's not risk free, just very low risk. My shoulder is almost certainly not going to heal all the way, but it should somewhat.


Are you still glad you had the procedure?
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Postby Sesj » Thu Nov 05, 2009 10:47 am

dr. Simka's answer:

Actually, stenting in Katowice is performed by vascular surgeons. All two stenting procedures were not performed by myself, since I have experience mostly in open venous surgery. It was done by my colleague, Dr. Ludyga who is vascular surgeon, and with assisstance of another vascular surgeon.
Stenting of occluded vessels is currently a routine procedure. Yet, complications are always possible. It is very difficult to estimate complication rate for this new procedure. In a case of stenting of other veins the most common complication is the occlusion of stent with thrombus, but this is usually a consequence of stenting of a disesed vein (post-thrombotic). In MS patients veins are healthy, they are only either hypoplastic, or occluded by pathologic valve. Therefore thrombosis is unlikely. Other complications include mechanic fracture of a stent (resulting in reoclusion) - this can be managed by restenting or balooning. A migration of the stent is also possible, but it is very rare complication.
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