Identifying anatomy

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Identifying anatomy

Postby CureIous » Sat Dec 26, 2009 8:42 pm

Image

Since we dig into the good stuff every now and then, thought this might be helpful for mapping purposes. Images are great, knowing what is what is even better.
Go to the link, and it will have the above picture. Underneath will be a list of anatomical structures. Click on the one you want, and an arrow points to that spot on the picture. There's much to dig around with on that site.
Try the link, goto: "Internal jugular vein" and click on it you'll see what I mean. Have fun. (Hit "anatomy menu" to go back to the menu)

Mark
http://library.med.utah.edu/WebPath/HISTHTML/ANATOMY/VHM1150R.html
RRMS Dx'd 2007, first episode 2004. Bilateral stent placement, 3 on left, 1 stent on right, at Stanford August 2009. Watch my operation video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwc6QlLVtko, Virtually symptom free since, no relap
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Postby CureIous » Sat Dec 26, 2009 8:47 pm

One more, just a picture but lots to look at on there. It's for a procedure but identifies a lot of what we concern ourselves with here, internal jugulars especially. Mark.


Image
RRMS Dx'd 2007, first episode 2004. Bilateral stent placement, 3 on left, 1 stent on right, at Stanford August 2009. Watch my operation video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwc6QlLVtko, Virtually symptom free since, no relap
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Postby Johnson » Sat Dec 26, 2009 10:16 pm

Thanks, Mark. Great site.

Did you notice the "cuts of meat" in the thigh images? Weird.
My name is not really Johnson. MSed up since 1993
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Postby CureIous » Sat Dec 26, 2009 11:20 pm

They got it all there Johnson, pretty neat eh? I forgot the best part, the atlas. It's in the menu but here's the link:
Clicking on a couple of those can fairly make your brain hurt...

http://bstr431.biostr.washington.edu/Atlas/atlas.html
RRMS Dx'd 2007, first episode 2004. Bilateral stent placement, 3 on left, 1 stent on right, at Stanford August 2009. Watch my operation video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwc6QlLVtko, Virtually symptom free since, no relap
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Postby Johnson » Sat Dec 26, 2009 11:29 pm

CureIous wrote:They got it all there Johnson, pretty neat eh? I forgot the best part, the atlas. It's in the menu but here's the link:
Clicking on a couple of those can fairly make your brain hurt...

http://bstr431.biostr.washington.edu/Atlas/atlas.html


Cool! Thanks. Mark!
My name is not really Johnson. MSed up since 1993
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Postby Algis » Sun Dec 27, 2009 5:55 am

Bon Appétit! 8O
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Postby CureIous » Tue Dec 29, 2009 11:33 am

Wanted to tuck this in here instead of creating a new topic.
It's a paper comparing different imaging techniques
for MRI/MRA/MRV's, specifically in children.
I wonder if any of these dear ones are heading
for MS later in life due to the stenoses, and
underdevelopment of the veins that were found.
Too bad there's no way to track them. http://radiology.rsna.org/content/235/3/1011.full
Mark

Cerebral MR Venography in Children:
Comparison of 2D Time-of-Flight and
Gadolinium-enhanced 3D Gradient-Echo Techniques1


Figure 8. Oblique shaded surface rendering from 3D MR
venography data set in 3-year-old boy shows
right dominant transverse sinus and a
stenosis of the sigmoid sinus (arrow);
the stenosis was not apparent at
2D MR venography
.

Image


DISCUSSIONThe larger venous structures draining the brain
may be studied noninvasively at MR imaging by using
phase-contrast techniques, time-of-flight techniques,
and contrast material–enhanced 3D sequences (1–7).
Phase-contrast MR angiography is limited by
gradient imperfections, eddy currents, and long acquisition times
and potential lack of sensitivity to slow flow if the
selected velocity encoding is incorrect (2,6).
Two-dimensional time-of-flight MR venography suffers
from progressive signal loss caused by slow-flowing protons
and by the flow of protons parallel to rather than
perpendicular to the imaging plane; both of these
phenomena result in spin saturation (3).

Gadolinium chelate reduces the spin saturation and
is best administered as a bolus to avoid enhancement
of chronically thrombosed venous structures;
enhancement of such structures may simulate
the appearance of a patent venous sinus
(6).
Techniques for bolus injection of gadolinium chelate with
subsequent acquisition of images with a 3D rapid
gradient-echo sequence have been described
previously for the imaging of intracranial venous
anatomy in adults (5,6).


This is meant in the vein (no pun intended) of
"just because they say it's not there, does not mean it's not there".
Imaging is an imperfect picture, results are open to interpretation.
Properly conducted ultrasound showing reflux will hopefully, someday,
become the gold standard for screening.

Mark
RRMS Dx'd 2007, first episode 2004. Bilateral stent placement, 3 on left, 1 stent on right, at Stanford August 2009. Watch my operation video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwc6QlLVtko, Virtually symptom free since, no relap
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Postby kinga » Tue Dec 29, 2009 12:46 pm

I found fantastic place to learn more on human anatomy-its at http://www.visiblebody.com/start .It has 7 days free trial,in my opinion plenty of time to see where our veins are :wink: takes few minutes to load but I think its worth waiting.Images are 3D.
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Postby CureIous » Wed Jan 06, 2010 10:29 pm

kinga wrote:I found fantastic place to learn more on human anatomy-its at http://www.visiblebody.com/start .It has 7 days free trial,in my opinion plenty of time to see where our veins are :wink: takes few minutes to load but I think its worth waiting.Images are 3D.


Hey Kinga, been meaning to get back on this thread and thank you for the link, what a GREAT way to get around the anatomy, pretty incredible site. For those unawares, you can sign up for the 7 day NO OBLIGATION trial (it just expires, no CC required), then you can add/subtract all the different systems, zoom in, rotate the image, and for the tech savvy, do some selective "PrtScn's" (Print screens then paste into MsPaint) to save the shots for future reference. I went hog wild on it for a few days, great site, great for anatomy, and fun to boot! I think it's a great tool for anyone, newbies and oldbies alike to tool around in for a few days. Clicking on any particular area is going to highlight the proper name for the vein, nerve, just about anything in your body!

Thanks again!

Mark.
RRMS Dx'd 2007, first episode 2004. Bilateral stent placement, 3 on left, 1 stent on right, at Stanford August 2009. Watch my operation video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwc6QlLVtko, Virtually symptom free since, no relap
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