Sleep Problems

A forum to talk about the general challenges of daily life with MS.

Sleep Problems

Postby buygirl » Mon Jul 07, 2014 4:51 pm

I was wondering if their was anything natural to help me with sleeping thru the night.
I do take Magnesium at night but I am not sure that helps at all.
The doctor did give me Lunesta at one point but I was hoping for something more natural.

Thanks in advance
buygirl
Getting to Know You...
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2012 5:42 pm

Advertisement

Re: Sleep Problems

Postby questor » Tue Jul 08, 2014 8:24 am

User avatar
questor
Family Elder
 
Posts: 280
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: Northern Calif Monterey Bay Area

Re: Sleep Problems

Postby buygirl » Tue Jul 08, 2014 1:23 pm

Thanks...I was told from the nutritionist at my neurologist office not to take melatonin

For some reason it is not good for people with MS


Thanks
Sari
buygirl
Getting to Know You...
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2012 5:42 pm

Re: Sleep Problems

Postby questor » Sat Sep 20, 2014 9:38 am

buygirl wrote:...I was told from the nutritionist at my neurologist office not to take melatonin
For some reason it is not good for people with MS...

I'm not sure if there is research to support this. The research I have found suggests the opposite. There is an abundance of anecdotal information floating around about ms, in that realm you can find evidence to support or refute almost any belief or claim. I'd ask the people in your neurologist's office if there is any science to support melatonin as not being good for ms. Recent reports suggest otherwise:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25179086
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4122810/
CCSVI Procedure 9/16/2009 at Stanford
Stent in left and right IJVs
SPMS
Copaxone
Former Ampyra User
Regular Botox Bladder Injections
User avatar
questor
Family Elder
 
Posts: 280
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 3:00 pm
Location: Northern Calif Monterey Bay Area

Re: Sleep Problems

Postby Froggie » Sun Sep 21, 2014 6:59 pm

As far as I know, melatonin is supposed to be GOOD for people with MS! I had a neurologist tell me directly that's what he recommends to MS patients and I had another tell me it was okay for sleep purposes. One neuro has a Ph.D in chemical engineering as well as her MD. Unless I am mistaken, we lose melatonin as we get older and it's especially problematic with MS patients. I find I don't need a lot for sleep (approx. 3 mg or so) and the sub-lingual form does not upset my stomach. It can induce some wacky dreams, but I'll take them over no sleep any day.
User avatar
Froggie
Family Elder
 
Posts: 114
Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Sleep Problems

Postby 1eye » Sat Oct 04, 2014 2:22 pm

I have had lots of sleep problems. I have tried various things. I kind of settled on a few things. Lorazepam, tylenol or advil night-time formulas and gravol. These night-time formulas are usually pain-killer mixed with a decongestant, which is the sleep medication part. Because I do not want dependency on anything to develop, and all of the above can be habit-forming, I alternate from night to night. Each of these things has its own pluses and minuses. I would take lorazepam if I felt particularly anxious for some reason, as it is a good tranquilizer. The pain medications can help reduce inflammation. Watch out for grogginess after you wake up, and anything for sleep does not mix with driving, drinking, or operating heavy machinery. Unless you *want* to have an accident.

Lately though, I am in the habit, which does not seem habitual, of taking a quarter tablet of seraquil at bedtime. If I do this before midnight, I am fine for the night. If I take it after that, I am too groggy in the morning. It works just as well day after day. It is an anti-anxiety drug, but different from lorazepam.

Melatonin is released naturally, and it is part of why we are not nocturnal. It is released at sundown, and should make you sleep (the natural release). It has a daytime counterpart, the release of endorphin at sunup. In my case I believe it was responsible for those automatic morning erections I used to have when younger. It helps you wake up.

LDN is supposed to enhance your endorphin production, which is thought to be low, in diseases like HIV, cancers, crone's and "MS". What you are timkering with here (and by taking melatonin) is your circadian rhythm, which controls daily cycles in your endogenous hormone production.

I am a bit suspicious of LDN for cancer, because it is thought to promote angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is a natural process, but it is definitely part of what turns a precancerous cell into a tumour, when is is acquiring its own blood supply. Angiogenesis may at the same time be a good thing for people with CCSVI, as it is necessary in order for new collateral veins to develop.

One of the objections to melatonin is the size of the dose. 2mg will flood your system with melatonin, and may be like hitting your circadian clock with a sledgehammer. I have read that 0.5 mg is the maximum, but I believe even that is probably way too much.

The absolutely critical thing about taking LDN or melatonin, is that you do it at the same time every day. Best thing to do about bedtime is to make a ritual of it. Always do the same things every day, half an hour to an hour before you go to bed, and always do it at the same time every day. All these circadian things, like eating, sleeping, in some people excreting, having sex, waking up, are part of a delicate daily circadian rhythm, which is easily disturbed.

The worst way to interfere with the daily shut-down cycle is to use artificial light. A close second which throws millions of people way off twice a year, and probably causes many automobile deaths, is Daylight Saving Time. Do not be surprised if sleep troubles come back after the "fall back" happens.

If you are a photo-phobe like I am, you may be aware that a soft red night-light is ok, but blue, green and the short wavelengths of light are more likely to wake you up or keep you awake. That is because our circadian clocks are synchronized by sunlight, which is more in the blue end.

All that is secondary to the most annoying effect of "MS" that I have: I don't dream.
"Try - Just A Little Bit Harder" - Janis Joplin
CCSVI procedure Albany Aug 2010
'MS' is over - if you want it
Patients sans/without patience
User avatar
1eye
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2932
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: Kanata, Ontario, Canada

Re: Sleep Problems

Postby kengriff » Sat Oct 04, 2014 9:39 pm

I have no sleep problems. Whenever I got o my bed, I sleep. But, when I get tensed, I face the sleeping problems. I could not sleep at that moment and felt very anxious.
kengriff
Family Member
 
Posts: 26
Joined: Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:23 pm


Return to Daily Life

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service