yucko

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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jan 25, 2007 6:30 pm

oh great. to add to my list of fun things to deal with, now i have a staphylococcus aureus infection. it's hard to research because it's normally hanging out on us anyway, and also because of the food-poisoning and methicillin resistant blabbedy-blah all over google. the connection i've found so far: neutrophil leukocytes. but i don't understand, and i'm tired of trying to figure it all out. is this what has been screwing up my airway too? or is it just my skin? i wish this could all just be fixed up and gone from my life!
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Hope this helps

Postby Melody » Thu Jan 25, 2007 7:06 pm

Symptoms include redness, swelling, and pain at the site of infection.
S. aureus can also cause serious infections such as pneumonia (infection of the lungs) or bacteremia (bloodstream infection). Symptoms of these infections include: difficulty breathing, malaise, fever, or chills.

Causes and Symptoms of Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus or “staph”) has long been recognized as one of the most important bacteria that cause disease in humans. It is the leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections such as abscesses (boils), furuncles, and cellulitis. Although most staph infections are not serious, S. aureus can cause serious infections such as bloodstream infections, pneumonia, or bone and joint infections.

Transmission
S. aureus is most often spread to others by contaminated hands.
The skin and mucous membranes are usually an effective barrier against infection. However, if these barriers are breached (e.g., skin damage due to trauma or mucosal damage due to viral infection) S. aureus may gain access to underlying tissues or the bloodstream and cause infection.
Persons who are immunocompromised or who have invasive medical devices are particularly vulnerable to infection.
Signs and symptoms of infection
Most infections caused by S. aureus are skin and soft tissue infections such as abscesses or cellulitis.

Abscess

Pocket of infection that forms at the site of injury.
Usually filled with pus.
Area surrounding the abscess is usually red, painful and swollen and the skin
surrounding the abscess can feel warm to the touch.
Cellulitis

An infection of the underlying layers of the skin.
Usually results from a scrape or cut in the skin which allows bacteria to enter, although no injury may be apparent.
Cellulitis can occur anywhere in the body, but most often occurs on the legs or arms.
Symptoms include redness, swelling, and pain at the site of infection.
S. aureus can also cause serious infections such as pneumonia (infection of the lungs) or bacteremia (bloodstream infection). Symptoms of these infections include: difficulty breathing, malaise, fever, or chills.

If you suspect you may have an infection with S. aureus contact your healthcare provider.
Duration of illness
Some people can be colonized with S. aureus and never get an infection. For those people who do get an infection, the time from exposure to development of disease can be from days to years.
Many common skin infections caused by S. aureus will heal without medical treatment. However, some skin infections will require incision and drainage of the infected site and some infections may require antibiotics.
Most skin infections will heal within a few weeks, but more serious skin infections can take longer to heal if treatment is delayed or if ineffective treatment is given.
More serious types of S. aureus infections (such as pneumonia or bloodstream infections) typically require hospitalization and treatment with intravenous antibiotics.
Complications
Most skin infections resolve without treatment, however, some infections require incision and drainage or antibiotic treatment to cure the infection.
Skin infections that are left untreated can develop into more serious life-threatening infections such as infections of the bone or blood.
Some people experience repeated infections with S. aureus.

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John was diagnosed Jan 2005. On lipitor 20mg .On Copaxone since July 4,2005. Vitamin D3 2000iu-4000iu (depending on sunshine months)June 10 2005(RX::Dr. O'Connor) Omega 3 as well Turmeric since April 2005. Q10 60mg. 1500mg liquid Glucosamine Nov 2005.
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thx mel

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jan 25, 2007 7:21 pm

thanks, i did get that much. i just mean i can't get much beyond that into its biochemistry, what it likes, what it doesn't like, bloodwork in infected ppl. but thanks for posting that anyway :)
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Postby mickb » Sat Jan 27, 2007 2:08 pm

Hi Jimmy:

Sorry to hear about the infection. It sounds like something which could be pretty serious. I'm sure your dealing with it but it does get tiring.

Take care of yourself

Mick
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taking care

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jan 27, 2007 8:30 pm

thanks mick i'll try :)

legs
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grrrr

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Feb 01, 2007 11:00 am

more fun stuff making me ecstatic. the new prescription didn't do anything. i think the condition actually got worse. so i'm off the antibiotic and back to antifungal. oh well i had a little blip there where i could imagine that brownies and bread were okay for me!
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still working on it

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Feb 05, 2007 11:17 am

the antifungal is making much better progress but it is not totally gone at all. i know if i stopped using it the problem would come right back. grr! i'm going to have to get back into intense supplement mode, it looks like, and hit this thing from the inside.
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Apr 10, 2007 6:57 pm

well, it's back again. the antifungal cleared it up for a few weeks, but not for good. i'm doing something wrong here! at least i know which prescription does the trick right off the bat this time.
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