Wahls diet discussion

A board to discuss various diet-centered approaches to treating or controlling Multiple Sclerosis, e.g., the Swank Diet

Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby Trent » Wed Oct 19, 2011 1:59 pm

Thanks. What is your MS profile? Have you had improvements on your diet?Are you on an upward curve?
If, as you say, high zinc will allow gluten consumption, it leads to the question of dairy/dairy-free. Wahls is dairy free as you know. How about your intake?
I am pleased to read of dkep11's improvement on the Wahls diet, and hope for the same.
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Oct 19, 2011 2:30 pm

no probs.

when i was diagnosed i was a disaster. i couldn't type, major sensory ataxia which meant i had to walk via vibration feedback, pick things up via visual feedback, no playing guitar, no normal typing, suffered a lot eating bread, with bloating and pain, etc.

now i'm essentially fine and i consider my improvements to be plateaued at this point. i have some permanent spinal cord damage and a 'ratty neck' that i should probably pay a little more attention to. now people can't tell i have ms unless i reaaallly overdo it physically (hiking 10km of difficult trails into and out of a canyon presents no difficulties) and end up with the staggers.

i don't avoid dairy altogether. in the wahls scenario i assume it's because of its pro-inflammatory nature, the whole avoid potential allergens thing. i get it, but again i don't buy the elimination of entire categories of foods. for me it's about balance and moderation. when i got diagnosed i had not consumed milk, or eggs for that matter, in 15 years. so i don't think they're the bad guy. it's imbalance. sure if i ate cheese all day in between glasses of milk we would see a problem. but instead, i enjoy milk in my tea, cream in my coffee, and i will put a very small amount of cheese in let's say one meal per day. i have yogurt for breakfast often. i don't drink milk by the glass, ever. yes dairy is pro-inflammatory but i watch my intake carefully and eat enough anti-inflammatory meat, veg etc to compensate.

hope that makes sense!
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby Trent » Mon Oct 24, 2011 8:23 am

Hi dkepp11/Dave,

I'm just wondering how you've been since your exciting news on Oct 16. Has your ability to get on your scooter remained the same, improved or declined? Any other changes?

My copy of 'Minding my Mitochondria' has just arrived, and I'm looking forward to reading it. Does your wife eat roughly the same as you, or are there two paralell meals being prepared in your home?

Chris
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby Thekla » Wed Nov 02, 2011 2:53 pm

For those wondering about a 'cup', I would use a 250ml measuring cup, it is almost exactly what she would be using, or a good handful with both hands cupped.

Jimmy, I envy you. You've figured it out and gotten results. I keep trying things and I'm still waiting for the jackpot. I really wish I knew what I was doing with nutrition/chemistry. I've done ccsvi and the BBD and some Swank. I like Terry Wahl's approach because it is more foods and fewer supplements. Supplements are expensive and not easily obtainable here.
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby dkep11 » Sun Nov 20, 2011 6:41 am

The Continuing Adventures Of Dave The Intrepid Gastronaut; MS Diet 7 month update

MS has been hammering me since 1998 and nothing seems to slow it down. On 4/20/2011 I finally decided to go 100% on the Wahls diet. This is my 7-month report.

Dr Wahls' story is compelling. (see www.terrywahls.org) In 2007 she wasn't too far physically from where I am today. She changed her diet and by 2008 she could walk and ride her bike! That will get the complete attention of someone like me!

(she did other things in addition to diet changes, like eletronic muscle stimulation, meditation - but she thinks diet played the primary role in her recovery)
(and she was never as bad as I am now)

My version of the Wahls diet:

Lots of veggies, esp. sulfur-rich and leafy greens and bright colors.

Small amount of fruit, some grain (but no gluten!)(I do quinoa and rice), small amounts of meat (chicken, turkey, or seafood)(I avoid beef and pork).

ZERO gluten, dairy, sugar, yeast, legumes, red meat, processed food. I think the first 2 on this list are the important ones, and #3 (sugar) isn't far behind.

Low starch; I do eat some grapes or blueberries or corn on occasion. But never a potato or potato chips.

On day 62 I began including a commercial daily green drink; we use Green Magma.

Wahls is sort of the Swank diet (the first recommended MS diet) of today, except I'd say it trades an emphasis on low-fat for an emphasis on veggies.

Wahls = Paleo-diet + anti-inflamatory diet + extra veggies.

I started on this 100% on 4/20... Before, I was 90% on the diet - it isn't far from how I ate normally... but if you walked in with a pizza before 4/20 and offered me a slice, I'd have one. Today - no thanks.

For me, the hardest things to totally give up were pizza, bacon, and cheese. Pretty much everything else was EZ; I don't have a sweet tooth. In the old days, I'd eat sweets occasionally but I never crave them.

My wonderful wife Janelle is on board with the diet (she ought to be; she found it and directed me to it!) and the food prep - out of necessity; I can't do it.
 
VVV new stuff VVV

Still sticking 100% to the diet as defined above. It's easy these days. I think only the first few weeks of a new eating regimin are tough; after that, it's just how you eat.

Incremental improvenents...

* On 10/27 I repeated the scooter-mount from the floor, just to show I could do it again. It's not a fluke (I feel I could do it easily in the morning on most mornings) - but I won't repeat it much since I think it is hard on the scooter; I'm trying to perfect sliding in from the bed rather than going to the floor.

I've done some little things over the last few weeks that are a bit notable - not as much as getting into the scooter was last month (because I had tried and failed) - these are things I just hadn't tried.

* On 11/4 (and many times since) I slid into the scooter from the bed.

* On 11/7 I stood at the pole for over 5 seconds. I'm doing this daily now, and trying to get longer each time. The scooter is a great place to start. We have a floor-to-ceiling transfer pole right by the bed; an outstanding place for me to try standing. We call it the "stripper pole" 8).

* On 11/12 I did my first solo excursion from bed in a long while: Slid onto the scooter, drove it to the pole, stood 3x (just for a few seconds), returned both scooter and me to our starting spots. It took about a half hour total! Heckuva workout. I'll try to make it a near-daily habit. I can do this in the morning; in the evening I still need assistance getting back into bed.

* On 11/16 the standing is getting better; I hit 30 sec on my first one; the whole process is < 20 min.

* Writing the final update on 11/19; longest stand at the pole so far this month is 40 seconds.

It looks good; what will the next month bring?

-Gastronaut Dave, over and out
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby dkep11 » Sun Nov 20, 2011 7:25 am

Hi Trent
You asked me 2 questions almost a month ago and I rudely blew you off! Sorry about that; I need to check this forum more frequently.

Q1 (I had reported some improvements a while back & you asked if they "stuck") - They seem solid & there are now more!

Q2 (you asked if my wife prepared my meals seperately) - Yes. It is hard to go 100% on an eating protocol without incentive; I have it, they don't (we have 2 daughters too).

-Dave
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby Trent » Sun Nov 20, 2011 10:11 am

Hi Dave,
I'm so pleased for you, and pleased that it seems to confirm the Wahls diet does have an effect. I'm trying to follow in your footsteps, but am lagging. Dr Wahls mitochondria book came a little while ago. and I'm trying to stick to her guidelines. I have daily carers who get me in/out of bed into/out of my powered wheelchair. So far I don't see any improvements, but perhaps I'm not eating enough greens - at least with the increase in veg. and fruit, constipation is virtually a thing of the past. I hope to start onn some of the supplements she recommends - do you take anything?
I've had MS since the late '70's, and it's been a slow decline all the way. My typing has now become left hand only - I'm RH - and down usually to one finger. The CCSVI treatment I had at the endf July had little effect, except that it releived some right arm pain and gave me back some movement.
Chris
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Nov 20, 2011 11:31 am

I received the following in an e-mail today from the Wahls Foundation (I apologize for its length – I can't think of another way to post this.):
Dr. Wahls Gives a TEDx Speech on Defeating MS!

This month’s newsletter will be a bit longer than usual. On November 11th, I was part of the TEDx conference in Iowa City, TED: ideas worth spreading. The T stands for technology, E for entertainment and D for design. The x means it was an independently sponsored event. The talks are being produced and will eventually be posted online. I will notify you when mine is available. Many ideas worth spreading were presented, including those in my talk, Up From The Chair: Defeating Progressive MS Without Drugs.

What follows is the text of my talk that day. Enjoy.

I loved doing Tae Kwon Do and was once a national champion. A lot has changed since then. I became a physician, had a son, and then a daughter. I developed a chronic, progressive disease for which there is no cure.

In 2000, when I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, I turned to the best MS center I could find: the Cleveland Clinic. I saw the best doctors, received the best care possible, and took the latest drugs.

By 2003, my disease had transitioned to secondary progressive MS. I took the recommended chemotherapy, I got my tilt recline wheelchair. I took Tysabri and then Cellcept, but I continued to become more severely disabled.

I was increasingly afraid, for both myself and my family, because I was moving toward becoming bedridden.

Wanting to forestall that as long as I could, I began searching PubMed.gov for the latest research articles. I knew that brains afflicted with MS shrank over time.

So I spent a few minutes each night reviewing animal models of three other disorders in which the brains shrink: Huntington’s, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. In all three diseases, mitochondria do not work very well, which in turn causes the early death of brain cells and shrinking brains.

With more searching, I identified studies where mouse brains and their mitochondria had been protected using fish oil, creatine and coenzyme Q. I translated those mouse-sized doses to human-sized ones and began my first round of self-experimentation. The rapidity of my decline slowed and I was grateful, but I was still declining.

I discovered the Institute for Functional Medicine, and through their continuing medical education course, Neuroprotection: A Functional Medicine Approach to Common and Uncommon Neurologic Syndromes, I learned more about brain cell biology and what I could do to improve mine. This is some of what I learned.

We have a billion cells in our brain and 10 trillion connections between our brain cells. All that connective wiring in our brain and spinal cord is insulated with something called myelin. MS damages myelin. To make healthy, robust myelin, our brains need B vitamins, in particular vitamin B1- thiamine, B9 - folate, and B12 - cobolamin. We also need plenty of omega-3 fatty acids and iodine.

This is a synapse, the junction between the brain cells. The golden drops are neurotransmitters, the molecules that activate the next brain cell in line. To make neurotransmitters efficiently, our brain cells need an ample supply of vitamin B6, which is pyridoxine and sulfur.

These are mitochondria. They are critical to our lives. Each one of our trillion cells has many, sometimes thousands of tiny mitochondria, which manage the cell’s energy needs. Without mitochondria, we could all be no larger than bacteria. In medical school I had to memorize countless reactions involving mitochondria, but I was never taught which substrates our cells can manufacture and which ones must be consumed to ensure those reactions happened properly. For mitochondria to operate at peak efficiency, they need an ample supply of B vitamins, sulfur and antioxidants. So I added sulfur and antioxidants to my list of vitamins and supplements.

Next, I decided that I shouldn’t be relying just on pills; I should be getting the long list of nutrients I was currently taking in pill form from my food instead because, in so doing, I’d likely pick up other important nutrients that science had yet to identify and name. Plus, I thought it likely that vitamins occurring in food were more powerful than the synthetic versions I was taking in pill form.

But I did not know where to find my list in the food supply. Neither the medical texts nor the food science texts had that kind of information. Fortunately, the internet did, and using it, I was able to create a food plan designed specifically for my brain cells and my mitochondria.

What are most Americans eating? We will start with you. Think back to the last 24 hours and add up all of the vegetables and fruit that you have eaten. Do not include corn or potatoes. Raise your hand if what you ate could cover a dinner plate. Keep it up if you could have covered 2 dinner plates. How about 3 dinner plates?

This photo is from the book, Hungry Planet, by Peter Menzel and shows a week’s worth of food for this American family. You do not see many fresh vegetables or berries. Instead there are many boxes and bottles of processed foods. Most of their calories will come from white flour, sugar, high fructose corn syrup and meat. This is how most Americans are eating and it is how most societies eat as they become affluent. It also explains why as societies become affluent their health often declines.

This graph is from Dr. Loren Cordain, a top nutrition researcher. It depicts what percent of Americans fail to get the recommended daily allowance or RDAs of vitamins and minerals. The vitamins are the lower half of the graph and you can see that half of us do not meet the RDAs for B vitamins, vitamin C or vitamin A. The minerals are on the top half and two-thirds of us do not meet the RDA for calcium, magnesium, zinc or iodine, and 80% of us do not getting enough omega-3 fatty acids.

Life is a series of complicated chemical reactions. If we are not eating the vitamins, minerals and other building blocks needed for those chemical reactions, structures do not get made, or they get made improperly. This causes our health to decline—our children are born with jaws that are too small, leading to crooked teeth and smaller brains, emotions become uncontrollable, blood vessels become stiff, the heart muscle weakens, and we age too rapidly.

This is why one in three children, one in two if you are African American or Hispanic, will become diabetic as children or young adults. This is why our schools have ever increasing numbers of kids with severe behavior and severe learning problems. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

A Typical Dinner by Dr. Wahls
For 2 ½ million years, before the dawn of agriculture a mere 10,000 years ago, our ancestors lived off what they could gather or hunt—a combination of leaves, roots, berries, wild game and fish that was locally obtained, in season and fresh. There was no grain, no dairy and no potatoes in their diet. The foodstuffs were very different, adapted to each locality. The Inuit in the far north ate very differently than Africans. Yet each of these primitive societies had diets that provided 2 to 10 times the daily recommended allowance for vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids. These hunter-gatherer diets—also called Paleo Diets—have the most nutrition per calorie consumed, more than the American Heart Association diet, more than the American Diabetes Association diet and more than the USDA food pyramid diet.

Primitive societies know more about eating for optimal health than modern scientists or physicians. I therefore started with the hunter-gatherer diet, and structured it to be sure I was getting an ample supply of the nutrients I had identified as important to the brain. It is 3 cups green leaves, 3 cups sulfur rich, 3 cups color, grass fed meat, organ meat and seaweed.

Here is how I did it. Three cups of vegetables equals a dinner plate heaped high.
I start with 3 cups or a plateful of greens every day because they are potent sources of B vitamins, along with vitamins A, C and K. Think Green B-A-C-K. They are also rich in minerals.

The B vitamins support your brain cells and your mitochondria. Vitamins A and C help protect you from cancer, and vitamin K helps keep your blood vessels and bones healthy. Minerals are important co-factors to hundreds of different enzymes used by your cells to conduct the business of life. Eating a plateful of greens every day markedly reduces your risk of cataracts and macular degeneration. My favorite green is kale. Other great greens include parsley, lettuce and spinach. Have more salads, green smoothies, or dehydrator kale chips.

Next I recommend 3 cups or a plateful of sulfur containing vegetables each day. Sulfur is important to our brains and our mitochondria. Our liver and kidneys use sulfur as they remove toxins from the bloodstream. Good sources of sulfur include cabbage family vegetables – cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collards, radishes, and turnips. The onion family is also rich in sulfur – that includes garlic, leeks and chives. So are mushrooms and asparagus.

Another Meal by Dr. Wahls
We should also eat a plateful of color, preferably 3 different colors each day. Bright colors equal flavonoids and polyphenols. These are potent antioxidants that help protect all your cells from damage and support your retinas and your ability to excrete toxins. You can get your color eating vegetables like beets, carrots, red cabbage, and colored peppers, or from berries.

I also want you to have high quality protein that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids. The myelin, the fatty insulation around the wiring in your brain, needs omega-3 fatty acids. You also need omega-3 fatty acids to ensure a healthy jaw, straight teeth and a larger brain. Eat wild fish, especially salmon or herring, and grass-fed meat or wild game.

The hunter-gatherers prized organ meats, which are potent sources of minerals, vitamins and coenzyme Q, which is particularly important to mitochondria. Have liver, heart or other organ meats once a week. The primitive societies traveled great distances to ensure access to seaweed, which is rich in iodine and selenium. Iodine is important to the manufacture of myelin, the insulation in the brain and to the excretion of toxins by the liver. In addition, having adequate iodine stores lowers the risk of breast cancer and prostate cancer. Studies have shown 80% of Americans have inadequate iodine stores in our bodies. Have some seaweed every week to restore and maintain healthy iodine levels.

People often can’t imagine eating 9 cups of vegetables a day. But if you eat your 9 cups of vegetables, three platefuls before having any grain or potatoes or dairy, you have dramatically increased the vitamin, mineral and essentially fatty acid intake in your diet. In addition, food allergies and sensitivities to gluten, the protein in wheat, rye and barley, and to casein, the protein in milk, are vastly under-diagnosed, and have been linked to a wide variety of health problems, including but not limited to asthma, eczema, infertility, depression, migraines, fibromyalgia, behavioral problems and neurological problems.

Yes, it does cost more to eat vegetables. But you will pay the price either way—for food that restores your health and vitality or for doctor visits, drugs, surgery and loss of work due to health problems.

For seven years, while receiving the best care from the best doctors, despite taking the latest, newest drugs, I grew steadily weaker and ever more disabled. In November 2007 I could not sit in a standard upright chair as you are now. I needed to be fully reclined or in bed. I could take a few steps using two canes and was losing my keys and phone repeatedly. I was having nightmares that my clinical privileges were revoked. That is when I created a diet specifically for my brain cells and my mitochondria.

In January 2008, just three months later, I could walk between exam rooms using just one cane. By March, I could walk throughout the hospital without a cane. In May I got on my bike for the first time in nearly a decade, and rode it around the block. In September, I rode my bike 18 miles. The following year I did a trail ride in the Canadian Rockies.

Not everyone will deteriorate to the point of needing a wheelchair. But everyone’s health declines if they starve their mitochondria. I am the canary in the coal mine, here to bring you this warning.

We have all have a choice to make. We can continue eating processed foods and watch both ourselves and our children grow steadily more overweight, depressed and disabled. We'll watch as healthcare costs balloon out of control and threaten to bankrupt us individually and collectively. Or we can eat for our mitochondria.

My choice is to teach the public about the healing power of food and continue doing clinical research, testing the impact of my interventions in others with progressive MS. So far our early data are very promising.

My dream is that someday soon, physicians and patients, coaches and athletes, employers and employees, policy makers, parents and young people, will all understand that becoming healthier, growing stronger, faster, and smarter, begins not with drugs or medical procedures, but with eating the way our DNA expects.

I challenge you to eat for your mitochondria and become ambassadors for the power of food to restore health and vitality.

If I can rise up from a tilt recline wheelchair by changing the food I consume, and now that we’ve seen similar results in others, stop for a moment and imagine what eating for one’s mitochondria could do for restoring the health and vitality of the people you love, your community, your country and your world. Just imagine.

We all have a choice to make.
What will yours be?
Thank you.

In health,

Dr. Terry Wahls
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby Trent » Sun Nov 20, 2011 1:15 pm

Hi lyndacarol ,
Thanks for that. I have her book 'Minding my mitochondria', have watched/listened to her on Youtube, and read her on Facebook,so I have encountered most of her current thinking. It's now a question of seeing if it will do anything for me - nothing else has, and time is not on my side: I'm 70 this week, and have had MS half my life.
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby dkep11 » Sun Nov 20, 2011 3:32 pm

Hi Chris:
Your typing sounds about like mine! It sux but it is what it is.

My daily supplement mix iz always changing, but here it is today;
fibercon/lax: 2
mega efa:2x2000mg
Synergy once daily multi vite
vite d3: 2x 2000 iu (another 2000iu in daily multivite)
primal defense: 2
advan C 1000 mg
milk thistle : 2 (2x 600 mg)
vite e: 1x 400mg
metabolic advantage: 2 (adrenal/thyroid support)
CoQ10/ALA/ALC: 700 mg

Next time I order I'll add some cal/mag/zinc
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Nov 20, 2011 4:48 pm

Chris – first of all, Happy Birthday to you! I think this will be a great year for you! I have great confidence that Dave is blazing the trail for all of us with the Wahls' diet.

Second, I think greens are important in the diet for several reasons. Maybe the most important reason is because they detoxify the liver and move those toxins out of the body quickly. Even adding a fiber supplement, as Dave does, may be a good idea.

Finally, for both you, Chris, and Dave, concerning the typing situation… Have you ever looked into a speech-recognition program, such as Dragon NaturallySpeaking? I believe that TIMS member marcstck (the Wheelchair Kamikaze) uses it and is quite pleased with it. I'm sure he would be glad to answer any questions about it.

I think that even some versions of Windows operating systems have a voice-recognition program built-in. I am "technologically challenged" and do not know how you find out if your system has such a program available. Perhaps it is mentioned in accompanying documentation; or perhaps a TIMS moderator or other smart person knows how to find and use such a program.

Being able to dictate to your computer and have the words typed for you would certainly overcome this typing difficulty.
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby dkep11 » Sun Nov 20, 2011 6:28 pm

re: speech recog - yes. home versions of Windows ship with the software... my problem is with the hardware. 2wice I bought headsets & both times the mic was fine at first, but then quit working a few weeks later.
Grr So I'm back to my 5wpm typing!
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MSWahls Diet - 8 month update

Postby dkep11 » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:10 am

MS has been hammering me since 1998 and nothing seems to slow it down. On 4/20/2011 I finally decided to go 100% on the Wahls diet. This is my 8 month report.

Dr Wahls' story is compelling. (see

www.terrywahls.org) In 2007 she wasn't too far physically from where I am today. She changed her diet and by 2008 she could walk and ride her bike! That will get the complete attention of someone like me!
(she did other things in addition to diet changes, like eletronic muscle stimulation, meditation - but she thinks diet played the primary role in her recovery)

(and she was never as bad as I am now)

My version of the Wahls diet:

Lots of veggies, esp. sulfur-rich and leafy greens and bright colors.

Small amount of fruit, some grain (but no gluten!)(I do quinoa and rice), small amounts of meat (chicken, turkey, or seafood)(I avoid beef and pork).

ZERO gluten, dairy, sugar, yeast, legumes, red meat, processed food. I think the first 2 on this list are the important ones, and #3 (sugar) isn't far behind.

Low starch; I do eat some grapes or blueberries or corn on occasion. But never a potato or potato chips.

On day 62 I began including a commercial daily green drink; we use Green Magma.

Wahls is sort of the Swank diet (the first recommended MS diet) of today, except I'd say it trades an emphasis on low-fat for an emphasis on veggies.

Wahls = Paleo-diet + anti-inflamatory diet + extra veggies.

I started on this 100% on 4/20... Before, I was 90% on the diet - it isn't far from how I ate normally... but if you walked in with a pizza before 4/20 and offered me a slice, I'd have one. Today - no thanks.

For me, the hardest things to totally give up were pizza, bacon, and cheese. Pretty much everything else was EZ; I don't have a sweet tooth. In the old days, I'd eat sweets occasionally but I never crave them.

My wonderful wife Janelle is on board with the diet (she ought to be; she found it and directed me to it!) and the food prep - out of necessity; I can't do it.



VVV new stuff VVV

 

Still sticking 100% to the diet as defined above. It's easy these days. I think only the first few weeks of a new eating regimin are tough; after that, it's just how you eat. But I do think the "100%" is important.

If you want to eat a paleo-diet but lack motivation, visit Dr. Wahls here

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLjgBLwH ... ture=share

You may also 'friend' Terry Wahls on Facebook for a variety of daily tips.

 

Incremental improvenents...

* On 11/20, right after posting my 7-month report last month, I hit 60 seconds standing at the pole. Nice, but I only did it once - 40 sec is usual. 60 sec was my high until the day before posting this.

* I had the following interesting exchange with Dr. Wahls on Facebook a few weeks ago:

Dr. Wahls
I'm a follower of yours, a SPMSer myself. I'm 7.5 months into my Wahls diet, and have seen some small changes.
But I'd be so much more encouraged if I heard about dramatic improvement from other folks in addition to you - particularly other men, as MS seems to be quite different between the sexes... Thoughts?

Terry Wahls

We have men in our study now - just starting and we have presented our initial 6 month data at 2011 Neuroscience conference - fatigue markedly improves, gait takes longer; 9 to 12 months to see changes.
Cool to hear the next few months on the diet have shown changes for other folks!

* In addition to diet, I have also been focusing my exercise more, as documented in my Multiply blog:

http://kepler1.multiply.com/journal/item/1161/

I think that to whatever extent I am seeing changes. exercise is also a big componant. They may both be necessary.

* On 12/19, the day before posting this, I hit 85 seconds on my daily stand-at-the-pole test. Nice, I hadn't eclipsed my high for almost a month.

* I have seen the word "cure" used in conjunction with this diet. I think it's a reach, a dangerous overstatement, an unrealistic setting of expectations. "Cure" is a big word - I'm just trying to get better. And even that is a overstatememt; since all I have ever done in my MSlife is go downhill, plateauing would be great. I think I have at least plateaued since starting this diet, with the chance of an uptick. We'll see!

* A friend of mine gave me an early Christmas present, an eletronic muscle stimulator. I became familiar with these after reading that Terry Wahls used them as part of her recovery. I hook it up several times a week and twitch away.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

-Gastronaut Dave, over and out
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby Amydee01 » Sat Jan 07, 2012 5:23 am

Dave, you said you're using a muscle stimulator, did you get instructions from a Ph. Ther.? I wanted to look into getting one, but wanted to make sure I was working on the right muscle group to help with standing and walking. Are you working out in conjuction with the stimulator?
Best to you,
Amy
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Re: Wahls diet discussion

Postby dkep11 » Sat Jan 07, 2012 3:10 pm

Hi Amy
Yes I do some other light exercising. No I haven't received official TENS unit instruction - but a friend works with them in the hospital and he knows enough to fool me!
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