OHSU Study?

A board to discuss various diet-centered approaches to treating or controlling Multiple Sclerosis, e.g., the Swank Diet

OHSU Study?

Postby NHE » Sun Feb 07, 2016 3:25 am

Whatever happened with the Swank MS Diet study at Oregon Health and Science University?
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT00852722

Vijayshree Yadav was the PI on the study, but I couldn't find anything in PubMed.
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Re: OHSU Study?

Postby CureOrBust » Sun Feb 07, 2016 5:33 am

I did not find the results. I did find a video from sep 2013 on Youtube where she said the results should be out in a few months. In the last minute of the clip.

However, I did find the following abstract having Vijayshree Yadav as one of the authors, which you may of also found in pubmed.

http://www.neurology.org/content/82/10_ ... .152.short

Effects of a Low Fat Plant Based Diet in Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Results of a 1- Year Long Randomized Controlled (RC) Study

ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE: To determine the compliance and safety of a plant-based low-fat diet and obtain preliminary data on its effects on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), clinical outcomes, lipids, insulin and body weight in relapsing remitting MS patients.

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests diet and vascular risk factors including obesity and hyperlipidemia may influence MS disease progression.

DESIGN/METHODS: A prospective, RC, rater-blinded 1-year study with subjects assigned to a low-fat diet (diet) or wait-listed (control) group. Study outcomes: changes over one year in: brain MRI new T2 lesion count and other MRI disease activity and atrophy parameters; safety, changes in: relapse rate, disability [expanded disability status score (EDSS)], Timed 25-foot walk (T25W), Fatigue Severity Score (FSS), blood lipids, body weight and compliance.

RESULTS: 61 subjects [diet -32 (including 6 drop outs); control - 29 (including 2 drop outs)]; median age 41 (range 24-55) y, mean disease duration 5.3 (range 0.8-14.7) y, mean EDSS 2.5 (range 0-4.5) were randomized. After baseline difference adjustment, the groups showed no significant changes in the number of active lesions (0.4, 95% CI -1.2 to1.9, p=0.6) or other MR parameters, relapse rate, EDSS, T25W and FSS. Mean (SD) change in Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and Total Cholesterol (TC)(mg/dL): Diet compliant (22/26) : -12.4 (22.4) and -16.2(28.5) vs. Control: -5.6 (24.8 ), -4.7 (28.5); Weight change (lbs) [mean (SD, range)]: Diet compliant (22/26): -16.3 (17.4, +6.8 - -52.1) vs. Control: +1.6 (12, +28.2 - -32.9). Results of fasting glucose, insulin and novel lipid markers will be presented.

CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated safety and achievable compliance of this diet. Small sample size, use of disease modifying therapies by many subjects, and one-year follow up likely contributed to the reduced power to detect changes on MRI and clinical outcomes. Improved lipid profile and weight may yield longer term vascular health benefits. Longer future studies with larger sample size are needed.
The clinical trial has "The low fat study diet is a very low-saturated-fat, plant food based diet" as the intervention. And there are other similarities between the clinical trial desc and this abstract. I just found "with subjects assigned to a low-fat diet (diet) or wait-listed (control) group" in the abstract and "No Intervention: 2. Regular diet group The regular diet arm will be a wait-listed group" in the clinical trial. I stopped looking after that. I guess I would of expected the actual trial to be larger, but that's just a guess.

I also guess we would need the full article to see the "preliminary data on its effects on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), clinical outcomes"
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Re: OHSU Study?

Postby NHE » Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:47 pm

CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated safety and achievable compliance of this diet. Small sample size, use of disease modifying therapies by many subjects, and one-year follow up likely contributed to the reduced power to detect changes on MRI and clinical outcomes.


Use of DMDs was probably enough to tank the study by itself. Sometimes, you want to ask "what were you thinking?"
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