The Sugar Industry Paid Off Harvard Researchers

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The Sugar Industry Paid Off Harvard Researchers

Postby NHE » Tue Sep 13, 2016 4:30 pm

Following the saga of the sugar story as told by Dr. Robert Lustig, diet-f9/topic19622.html, we now learn that the sugar industry had paid off Harvard researchers in the 1960's to write a review paper promoting the role of fats in heart disease while stating that sugar had no role in heart disease and contained just empty calories that only led to a higher incidence of tooth decay.

Millions of lives have been negatively impacted by these actions. Heart disease, obesity and diabetes are now epidemic. All this suffering for just a little profiteering. It seems the costs were too high.


How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/13/well/ ... o-fat.html

The sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead, newly released historical documents show.

The internal sugar industry documents, recently discovered by a researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, and published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, suggest that five decades of research into the role of nutrition and heart disease, including many of today’s dietary recommendations, may have been largely shaped by the sugar industry.

“They were able to derail the discussion about sugar for decades,” said Stanton Glantz, a professor of medicine at U.C.S.F. and an author of the JAMA Internal Medicine paper.

The documents show that a trade group called the Sugar Research Foundation, known today as the Sugar Association, paid three Harvard scientists the equivalent of about $50,000 in today’s dollars to publish a 1967 review of research on sugar, fat and heart disease. The studies used in the review were handpicked by the sugar group, and the article, which was published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, minimized the link between sugar and heart health and cast aspersions on the role of saturated fat.

Even though the influence-peddling revealed in the documents dates back nearly 50 years, more recent reports show that the food industry has continued to influence nutrition science.

Last year, an article in The New York Times revealed that Coca-Cola, the world’s largest producer of sugary beverages, had provided millions of dollars in funding to researchers who sought to play down the link between sugary drinks and obesity. In June, The Associated Press reported that candy makers were funding studies that claimed that children who eat candy tend to weigh less than those who do not.

The Harvard scientists and the sugar executives with whom they collaborated are no longer alive. One of the scientists who was paid by the sugar industry was D. Mark Hegsted, who went on to become the head of nutrition at the United States Department of Agriculture, where in 1977 he helped draft the forerunner to the federal government’s dietary guidelines. Another was Dr. Fredrick J. Stare, the chairman of Harvard’s nutrition department.
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